hostages

Photo Of The Day

In a May 16, 1986 photo, the body of Doris Young is removed by officials after the Cokeville Elementary hostage situation in Cokeville, Wyo. On May 16, 1986, a man and his wife with a bomb took the entire student body at the town's only elementary school hostage. David Young demanded $300 million in ransom. The bomb accidentally detonated, and Young shot and killed his wife and then himself. RICK SORENSON/Casper Star-Tribune

In a May 16, 1986 photo, the body of Doris Young is removed by officials after the Cokeville Elementary hostage situation in Cokeville, Wyo. On May 16, 1986, a man and his wife with a bomb took the entire student body at the town’s only elementary school hostage. David Young demanded $300 million in ransom. The bomb accidentally detonated, and Young shot and killed his wife and then himself.?RICK SORENSON/Casper Star-Tribune

The Miracle of Cokeville

Some places are branded by disaster, by the stories of one horrible day that no one can forget: Oklahoma City, Columbine, and the Twin Towers. What sets Cokeville apart is that the story of its horrible day is about what almost happened but didn’t.

Cokeville Wyoming was the sight of a parent’s worst nightmare on May 16th, 1986 when a mentally disturbed man and his wife entered an elementary school with guns and a homemade gasoline bomb. ?They kept all the children in a single room while positioning themselves in the middle of it, David and Doris Young began a standoff that would last hours.

David Young, a former town Marshall, he had been the tiny towns only police officer in six months during 1979 and when he was fired, he moved to Tucson, Arizona. He and his wife returned to Cokeville in 1986 and carried out their insidious plan.? Young had a manifesto called “Zero-Infiniti”?and proclaimed “this is a revolution!” as he and his wife took an entire generation – over 160 children, teachers, and school staff, he held them to hostage and wouldn’t release them until he was given over 300 million dollars and a personal phone call from the President of the United States.

The heart-stopping events in this remote town ? so remote that in 1986 it wasn’t on some highway maps ? made headlines around the world.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX SWEDEN / EGAN-POLISEN. A file photo taken on August 23, 1973 shows police officers wearing gas masks escorting Jan-Erik Olsson (C) in handcuffs after a hostage drama at the Kreditbanken bank on Norrmalmstorg square in Stockholm. Forty two years after a Swedish hostage drama gave rise to the term "Stockholm Syndrome", the phenomenon is still being used, and misused, to explain the reactions of kidnap victims. But one man knows exactly how it works. Jan-Erik Olsson remembers clearly the strange things that happened after he walked into a bank in the Swedish capital on August 23, 1973, pulled out a submachine gun and took four employees hostage.

Photo: AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX SWEDEN / EGAN-POLISEN.
A file photo taken on August 23, 1973 shows police officers wearing gas masks escorting Jan-Erik Olsson (C) in handcuffs after a hostage drama at the Kreditbanken bank on Norrmalmstorg square in Stockholm. Forty two years after a Swedish hostage drama gave rise to the term “Stockholm Syndrome”, the phenomenon is still being used, and misused, to explain the reactions of kidnap victims. But one man knows exactly how it works. Jan-Erik Olsson remembers clearly the strange things that happened after he walked into a bank in the Swedish capital on August 23, 1973, pulled out a submachine gun and took four employees hostage.

The Story Behind Stockholm Syndrome

Forty two years after a hostage drama in Sweden gave rise to the term ?Stockholm Syndrome,? reference to the phenomenon is still being used to explain the reactions of kidnap victims.

On the morning of August 23, 1973, an escaped convict crossed the streets of Sweden?s capital city and entered a bustling bank, the Sveriges Kreditbanken, on Stockholm?s upscale Norrmalmstorg square. From underneath the folded jacket he carried in his arms, Jan-Erik Olsson pulled a loaded submachine gun, fired at the ceiling and, disguising his voice to sound like an American, cried out in English, ?The party has just begun!?

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No. No. No. And never.

[A]?White House review of America’s hostage policy is making the recommendation that the U.S. government look the other way if families want to make a ransom payment to terror groups to free their loved ones — thereby changing the long-standing rule that the federal government does not allow anyone to negotiate with terrorists.

But those White House officials say that the change has been requested in the wake of murdered hostage James Foley at the hands of ISIS. Foley’s family say they were threatened with prosecution by an unnamed White House official when they suggested paying a ransom to free their son. An allegation other families have made as well.

The most recent hostage fatality was Warren Weinstein who was accidentally killed in a U.S. drone strike against al Qaeda. His family did attempt a $250,000 ransom, but was unsuccessful in buying Weinstein’s release.

One senior White House official commented on these recommendations: “There will be absolutely zero chance of any family member of an American held hostage overseas ever facing jail themselves, or even the threat of prosecution, for trying to free their loved ones.”

This is one of these situations where you can have two positions at the same time. ?On the one hand, paying ransoms will simply increase the amount of kidnappings and hostage takings. ?It will turn into a business, and international travellers will be hit hard.

Never. ?Ever. ? Do not pay ransom. ?? Read more »

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Associated Press

Photo: Associated Press

? By Taking Hostages

McClain holds a sawed-off shotgun at the throat of Judge Harold J. Haley and aims a pistol at law enforcement officers. In the background are other hostages taken by the convicts in their attempt to escape. Road flares, which were used to simulate sticks of Dynamite, was held at the Judge?s throat before being replaced by a sawed-off shotgun which was taped around his neck.

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Religion of Peace enters hostage and extortion business

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Are ISIS running out of money? ?Why else would the men and women of Islamic State need to do such non-peaceful things as demand money for the return of hostages?

The Islamic State has released a video threatening to kill two Japanese hostages unless they receive $200 million within 72 hours.

It comes two days after Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged the same amount in non-military support of countries fighting ISIS.?

The clip, posted on militant websites associated with the extremist group, featured the British-accented jihadi widely known as ‘Jihadi John’ who appeared in the beheading videos of David Haines, Alan Henning, James Foley, and Steven Sotloff.

The militant with a British accent in the video said the Japanese were targeted for supporting Western military efforts against?the Islamic State group, which now holds a third of Iraq and Syria under its self-declared caliphate.

‘You have proudly donated $100 million to kill our women and children, to destroy the homes of the Muslims,’ the militant says.

A British-accented jihadi also has appeared in the beheading videos of slain American hostages James Foley and Steven Sotloff, and with British hostages David Haines and Alan Henning.

Jihadi John should be up for an Academy Award for all his movies.

It is clear that there is no reasoning or negotiating with these people. ?The sooner the West deals with them, the better.

The Islamic State group has beheaded and shot dead hundreds of captives ? mainly Syrian and Iraqi soldiers ? during its sweep across the two countries, and has celebrated its mass killings in extremely graphic videos.

Yep. ?Religion of Peace. ?Kills anyone who doesn’t particularly cares to follow the rules to the required standards. ?Rapes women, ?tortures children. ?And now is in the international hostage for cash business.

When will the world say “enough!”?

– Daily Mail

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