Ian Fletcher

Face of the day

Ian Fletcher -Faifax NZ

Ian Fletcher
-Faifax NZ

While in general our MSM seem determined to only focus on the negative possibilities of our Government having these kind of capabilities I for one am glad that they are trying to protect us as the threat is very real. Given the fact that the Labour Party could not even make their website secure from the average Joe on the web clicking on the links they provided aren’t you glad they are not currently in power? They called looking at all the private data and credit card details that they left totally unsecured and in public view on their website ‘hacking’ for goodness sake. Fit to run this country? I don’t think so. What they did was no different to someone not putting privacy settings on their facebook page and then being all outraged when everyone was able to look at their photos and download them.

Spy boss Ian Fletcher has both hands tied behind his back justifying cyber-security defence system Project Cortex

The director of the Government Communications Security Bureau says he can’t say how Cortex will work or exactly which organisations will come under its protection. To do so would risk exposing vulnerabilities, he says. Nor will he say how much Cortex is costing.

Nevertheless, he wants to talk about why the GCSB is making the investment in the system, the existence of which was brought to light by Prime Minister John Key in the lead up to Kim Dotcom’s “moment of truth” event in September.

The Government is due to review the country’s spy agencies and their legislative underpinning next year. Fletcher says the GCSB’s biggest challenge is recruiting the right people in a tight labour market.

The internet has made it easier for “both good things and bad things to happen”, he says.

Read more »

If you agree with me that’s nice but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo. Look between the lines, do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

John Campbell can now safely be called Fonzie

Last night on Campbell Live they jumped the shark.

Jumping the shark is an idiom created by Jon Hein that was used to describe the moment in the evolution of a television show when it begins a decline in quality, which is usually a particular scene, episode, or aspect of a show in which the writers use some type of “gimmick” in an attempt to keep viewers’ interest. The phrase is based on a scene from a fifth-season episode of the sit-com Happy Days when the character Fonzie jumps over a shark while on water-skis.

David Farrar explains the idiotic presumptions of the show.

You have to all go and watch Campbell Live tonight and try and stop laughing.

It’s classic conspiracy theory stuff. It sort of goes like this:

  • Key appoints Mateparae Governor-General to create vacancy at  – March 2011
  • Director of US National Intelligence, Jim Clapper, visits one week later and meets 
  • McCully visits Hillary Clinton May 2011
  • PM has breakfast with Ian Fletcher in June 2011
  • Key visits Obama July 2011 and shock horror asks Fletcher to apply for GCSB job the SAME MONTH!
  • Oct 2011 – Key, Fletcher, SIS Head, MFAT Head, NZDF  and DPMC Head have a meal at British High Commissioner’s place!
  • 12 Dec 2011 – Key meets GCSB (one of 10 meetings that year) and meets Ian Fletcher who is in NZ
  • 16 Dec 2011 – surveillance of Dotcom begins
  • Obama invites Key to White House – May 2014 – THE PAYOFF!   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Winston Peters and his own conflicts of interest, Ctd

Winston-Peters-NZH

Over the coming weeks Winston Peters will look more like this as the true details about Kim Dotcom are released.

Yesterday I wrote about Winston Peters and his parliamentary questions on behalf of his partner and the firm she worked for at the time.

I also wrote earlier about Winston Peters and his three visits to the Dotcom Mansion. At the time I also mentioned that there was more to  come on this.

On the three occasions that Winston Peters had admitted visiting the Dotcom Mansion there were many things that were discussed.

Perhaps the biggest thing though was what Dotcom claims he knows about John key and what John Key knows.

Winston Peters constantly goes on about this hinting at coming destruction at his hands by the release of information that could only have come from Dotcom.

Sources inside the Dotcom mansion tell me that Dotcom sat down and essentially dictated the questions that needed to be asked in parliament and on one occasion sat and watched with glee as Winston Peters asked the very same questions in parliament.

Winston Peters now has some very clear questions that need to be answered about his political association with Kim Dotcom and why he asked those questions on behalf of Dotcom and whether or not there was any consideration given.

Here is an outline of all the questions asked by Winston Peters regarding Kim Dotcom.

Written Questions:

8031 (2012). Rt Hon Winston Peters to the Minister Responsible for the GCSB (28 Sep 2012): What briefings, reports and correspondence did he receive in his capacity as Minister in the period 16 December 2011-20 January; listed by date and source?

Rt Hon John Key (Minister Responsible for the GCSB) replied: I refer the Member to my answer to Question No. 07970 (2012)

8060 (2012). Rt Hon Winston Peters to the Minister Responsible for the GCSB (28 Sep 2012): How many interception warrants has he issued under Section 17 of the Government Communications Security Bureau Act, by year, since 2010?

Rt Hon John Key (Minister Responsible for the GCSB) replied: It is my practice to not comment on such matters.

8118 (2012). Rt Hon Winston Peters to the Minister Responsible for the GCSB (28 Sep 2012): What briefings, reports and correspondence from departmental sources did he receive in his capacity as Minister on 13 September 2012; listed by title, date and source?

Rt Hon John Key (Minister Responsible for the GCSB) replied: I refer the Member to my answer to Question No. 07970 (2012)

8127 (2012). Rt Hon Winston Peters to the Minister Responsible for the GCSB (28 Sep 2012): When did he, or any of his represenatives, first learn of Kim Schmitz in his capacity as Minister?  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Politicking on Security

Audrey young highlighted something that Labour flunkies have missed in their desire to smear John Key as some sort of puppet of offshore forces…that he is cleaning up a mess of Helen Clark’s making. Labour in attacking John Key and playing politics with security have shown just how hypocritical and venal they are in the pursuit of a magic bullet with which to slay John Key,

Labour made the GCSB story about John Key, not Kim Dotcom, or the agency itself. And with a few victories against him, such as fingering him for shoulder-tapping an old school mate for the GCSB directorship, it could not bring itself to support Key’s bill.

Key has not been given credit for much in the process. But he clearly had concerns about the GCSB before the unlawful spying on Dotcom.

It had been run by a tight club within the defence and intelligence community and established some disturbing work habits, as the Kitteridge report exposed.

The notion that everything was hunky dory back in the days of former Chief of Defence Force Sir Bruce Ferguson is myth. Most of the legally dubious spying on New Zealanders went on under his, and Labour’s, watch.

Of the 88 cases, only four were warranted, according to the agency itself.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

No law breaches by GCSB

After all the hissy fits by the left wing and a serious PR campaign aided and abetted by elements in the media on behalf of Kim Dotcom, the GCSB has been cleared of any law breaking.

No one can question the credibility of the Inspector-General, though I am sure some will try. He is a former New Zealand Solicitor-General and former High Court Judge who was appointed Inspector-General by Helen Clark.

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Paul Neazor has cleared the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) of illegal spying on New Zealanders.

Mr Neazor was asked to conduct an inquiry into potential breaches of the GCSB Act after Cabinet Secretary Rebecca Kitteridge’s report on the bureau’s compliance with legislation raised concerns about 88 instances where the GCSB had spied on New Zealanders.

“The Inspector-General formed a view that there have been no breaches, although the law is unclear and the Inspector-General recommends amending it”, GCSB Director, Ian Fletcher said in a statement.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Reheating Breakfast Over and Over and Over Again

We all know that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but Andrea Vance has taken it to a whole new level with today’s front page lead in the Dominion Post.

Shock horror headline “Key met spy candidate for breakfast“.

Yup this could be a marginal beltway story, if she hadn’t already written the same story three times before.  A quick google search reveals her obsession with this breakfast.

Article 1
Article 2
Article 3

The DomPost must have been really short of news that it could beat the Prime Minister up with today.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Apparently the Green taliban has “orthodox” economic ideas

In his talkback stint in Wellington yesterday Labour Leader David Shearer described Green economic policy as “orthodox”, and suggested that the Greens were desperate for power and would compromise all their loopy policies if offered the baubles of office.

He also refused to endorse the Chris Hipkins Standard on public appointments.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

He shoots, he scores…oh wait!

Labour deputy leader Grant Robertson’s complaint to the Auditor-General has fallen on deaf ears. There is nothing untoward about the process by which Ian Fletcher was appointed.

The auditor-general will not investigate the appointment of spy boss Ian Fletcher, the watchdog has announced.

In a statement, the office of the auditor-general said the law does not prescribe any particular process that must be followed before appointing the director of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB).  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

What is Grant Robertson’s role?

Grant Robertson has been front running the attack on John Key and the GCSB. This was done partly because David Shearer is compromised when it comes to remembering things, since he can’t even remember millions stashed in an offshore bank account.

However there may be another reason for Grant Robertson to be front running this…he knows more than he is letting on. The Labour Party have opened up a whole can of hurt on themselves by desperately trying to link the Prime Minister to the unlawful spying by the GCSB on Kim Dotcom. I say this because it turns out, after the Kitteridge report was leaked yesterday that the GCSB may have spied on 88 New Zealand citizens unlawfully, using legislation that Labour set up in 2003.

David Shearer scoffed at the report on Q+A on Sunday when asked, dismissing it as an “internal report”, now however he says that the report validates his calls for an independent inquiry into our spy agencies. Quite how that could be done without compromising our national security has probably escaped him right now.

However what is more curious is that Grant Robertson, who has been leading Labour’s attacks on the Prime Minister’s oversight of the GCSB, was Helen Clark’s senior advisor when the legislation was written. Is it possible that he has known about these issues for quite some time and has used his information to conflate the Kim Dotcom issue in order to attempt to smear all of GCSBs illegal spying under Clark with the few instances under John Key’s watch?

Helen Clark was also notoriously secretive about the GCSB and its operations, and never answered any questions in Parliament about the agency, citing national security reasons. Labour are trying to hang the PM for answering questions in a much more forthright manner than his predecessor.

Air Marshal Bruce Ferguson, who has led the attacks on the appointment of Ian Fletcher, was as the agency’s director in 2012, was the GCSB Director during most of the time the 88 allegedly unlawful spying incidents took place.

That is an amazing coincidence of Clark appointed people all hammering the government in unison over something that was started by them, indeed performed by them, over a much longer period that under John Key.

Rebecca Kitteridge, who reviewed the GCSB’s systems, found that GCSB’s compliance systems set up over many years were totally inadequate, that there was no depository of legal advice, that the audit regime is flawed, that it’s external reporting was insufficient, that it’s management structure is top-heavy, poorly performing staff are tolerated and redeployed, and that the view of the previous Chief Legal Advisor, who wore “too many hats”, was viewed as authoritative and seldom questioned by staff.

It’s no wonder the State Services Commissioner recommended that an outsider with transformational change management experience, rather than yet another military flag officer, take over the leadership of the GCSB.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Dompost uses News of the World ambush tactics to trick readers

Earlier today the on the Stuff website a story was posted by Andrea Vance about a leaked GCSB report. David Farrar linked to it and pasted some text from the article.

The Government’s beleaguered intelligence agency may have unlawfully spied on 85 people, a top secret review reveals.

The report, ordered after the Kim Dotcom fiasco, contains a raft of criticisms of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB). …

The revelations are contained in the report, prepared by Cabinet Secretary Rebecca Kitteridge, and seen by Fairfax Media. …

The explosive revelations confirm that the illegal spying was far broader than the Dotcom case – and involves up to 85 people and cases dating back nearly a decade.

The illegal spying was conducted between April 2003 and September last year and done on behalf of the Security Intelligence Service, the domestic spy agency.

When you click on the link and look at the story now though all of that text has been removed, and quite a bit more as far as I can tell.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.