IHC

Does it do good or does it feel good?

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In a continuation of the article about the differences between the left and the right’s worldview, let’s analyse a 2007 political policy decision by asking these questions:

Does it do good?

Does it feel good?

In 2007 the Labour government changed the law so that the intellectually disabled would be paid the minimum wage. This was a feel good policy and they ignored the many families (including my own) that begged them to reconsider. We told them it would hurt intellectually disabled men and women who needed a lot of supervision and staff support in order to be able to work. If they forced sheltered workshops to the pay minimum wage then they would have to close. Businesses who previously were happy to take on a disabled person would shut their doors because an intellectually disabled person needs support to do their job, unlike an able-bodied person.

The Labour government, under Helen Clark, ignored the pleas of families all over New Zealand because, to them, this was a policy that looked great on paper and made people ignorant of the truth feel good.

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Dirty Politics for the mentally handicapped

Although not surprising, it still turns my stomach

A large-scale provider of care for the intellectually disabled has been accused of openly influencing the voting of residents in their care.

A former community support worker at Idea Services said carers actively encouraged residents to vote Labour and schooled them on what boxes to tick on their ballot paper.

The Waikato-based worker, who declined to give her full name for fear of reprisals, said Idea Services management pressured carers to vote Labour and also directed them to influence how residents voted.

Idea Services is a subsidiary of IHC.

“By the time they [clients] get taken to the voting booths, they already know the colour that they have got to vote for,” the former staffer said. “They get told things like you can vote for whoever you like but Labour is the only political party that cares what happens to you.”

Let’s be realistic. ?It’s been going on forever. ?The stupidity is getting caught at it.? Read more »

More lies from Cunliffe

Lindsay Mitchell highlights an outrageous lie from David Cunliffe.

Then?David Cuncliffe?(13:06)

Caller with two special needs children queries what Labour will do about their employment prospects.

Cunliffe answers, “National has cancelled a lot of those sheltered employment schemes that provided a stepping stone into full-time employment…”

As I recall, in Labour’s last two terms, parents of special needs young adults were up in arms about Ruth Dyson, Disabilities Minister, forcing the minimum wage onto sheltered workshops predicting closures. The IHC, the major sheltered workshop provider, has closed enterprises since.? Read more »

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