Immigration to New Zealand

Photo Of The Day

Immigration poster

New Zealand was not known to Europeans until 1642. Over 150 years later, settlers started to arrive from England, Scotland, and Ireland. The journey was long, arduous, and uncomfortable, but they came in the hope of a better life.

In the 1850s Auckland province offered 40 acres (16 hectares) for any immigrant to the province who was likely to become a ‘useful colonist’, plus another 20 acres (8 hectares) for any child aged five to 18. Such immigration advertising helped to establish the idea that New Zealand was a pastoral paradise where there was abundant fertile land for farming.

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Misleading again, why can’t Cunliffe just tell the truth?

David Cunliife was taking questions yesterday at Stuff.

It was pretty hostile and the rest was filled with weasel words.

Like his addressing of the issue regarding Kiwis in Australia.

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Indolent Maori hating on hard working Asian Kiwis

The media and opposition parties have much to answer for and now they can see the fruits of their labour in a new survey that shows the constant negative media and political attacks against Asians is driving prejudice.

That prejudice is more pronounced amongst lazy maori bludgers who think the world owes them a living and sit by idly watching as hard working asian migrants snaffle up the jobs.

Maori dislike Asian immigrants more than any other group of New Zealanders, a new poll shows.

Asians are blamed for taking jobs from Maori, driving Maori to Australia, lacking understanding of the Treaty of Waitangi and competing for cultural funding.

“The diversity of New Zealand is beginning to undermine the investment we have in biculturalism. [Maori] don’t believe new migrants are sympathetic to biculturalism and the Treaty,” said Massey University pro vice-chancellor, Professor Paul Spoonley.

Surveys show Maori have an increasingly negative perception of Asians. It is caused by “competition in the labour market . . . and competition for cultural resources,” Spoonley said.

Maori have a unique position in New Zealand and advancing their cultural and social needs must be put ahead of the needs of immigrants, said Maori Party leader, Te Ururoa Flavell.

“[Are Maori] more important than anyone else? Possibly. I think that the most important thing is that the people of the country recognise our unique part in the fabric of this nation,” said Flavell.

He is concerned immigrants are taking much needed jobs from Maori, contributing to disproportionate emigration to Australia. As the indigenous people of New Zealand, the government should put the needs of Maori ahead of new migrants he said.

According to an Asia NZ Foundation survey, Maori views on Asian immigration have deteriorated in the past year. While most New Zealanders increasingly saw the benefit of Asian immigrants, 44 per cent of Maori believed New Zealanders were more negative towards people from Asia compared with a year ago.

That is well above the 27 per cent of all New Zealanders who are less positive towards Asians than last year.

A majority of Maori also believed New Zealand was allowing too much investment from Asia.

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Another crisis averted by the opposition declaring there was a crisis

Labour has a habit of naming something a crisis and the campaigning on it.

We had the manufactured manufacturing crisis and on the very day they launched their report into the crisis statistics came out that showed manufacturing was going gang-busters and has for every quarter since.

Immigration was supposed to be a crisis too. Turns out the opposition have picked another winner…for the government.

The Herald reports.

New Zealand’s inbound net migration rose to a 10-year high in January as fewer people quit the country to cross the Tasman and the number of new migrants continued to gain.

The country gained a seasonally adjusted 3,100 net new migrants in January, the most since May 2003, and up from 2,900 in December, according to Statistics New Zealand. Seasonally adjusted, there was an outflow of about 2,640 people to Australia, while about 8,210 new migrants arrived in New Zealand.  Read more »