Immigration

Labour Party on Immigration and the refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. Five parties responded to my questions and I published their responses in full and un-edited. My attempts to get a response from the Labour Party were unsuccessful so I looked at their website to try to find the answers to the questions I asked the other parties.

Immediately I had a problem as the Labour Party states on their website that…

Following the 2014 Election, Labour placed all policy under review.

We will continue to announce new policy through to the 2017 Election.

However, Labour has announced 12 new policies so far and while none of them was about immigration their very first one was about the refugee quota.

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New Zealand First on immigration and the refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. Five parties responded to my questions and I published their responses in full and un-edited. My attempts to get a response from New Zealand First were unsuccessful so I have used their immigration policy as published on their website to find the answers to the questions I asked the other parties.

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under New Zealand First’s  policy and why?

Answer: 

New Zealand First is committed to a rigorous and strictly applied immigration policy that serves New Zealand’s interests. Immigration should not be used as a source of cheap labour to undermine New Zealanders’ pay and conditions…

New Zealand First will strengthen Immigration New Zealand to give it the capacity to apply immigration policy effectively.

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Comment of the Day

In yesterday’s General Debate idbkiwi made this comment:

Universally derided, it seems, for his comments about Sweden’s alleged problems with mass immigration, Trump’s detractors (especially those from Sweden) had a field day besmirching him. Fair enough, I suppose, nobody likes their own country to be seen in a poor light; except New Zealand lefties, who revel in disparaging God’s own country.

But, after the sound of mutually-congratulatory backslaps for the wittiest put-downs of Trump died down there are two worthwhile questions to ask; How do the Swede’s feel about their personal security and crime?, and: Are any negative feelings (if any) justified or borne out in statistics? The answer is yes, to both questions, based on the latest available information.   Read more »

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The Maori Party on immigration and the refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. Five parties responded to my questions and I published their responses in full and un-edited. My attempts to get a response from the Maori Party were unsuccessful so I read the 2014 Policy Manifesto on their website to try to find the answers to the questions I had asked both them and the other parties.

I was shocked to discover that their latest manifesto dated 2014 contained no Immigration policy at all.

The Maori party had answered my questions previously about Israel so I was surprised when they did not reply. Now I am wondering if it was because they do not have an immigration policy.

screenshot-whaleoil

2014 Maori Party Policy manifesto screenshot-whaleoil

2014 Maori Party Policy manifesto Screenshot-whaleoil

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Liberal Canadian Feminist visits Mosque and gets put in her place

When you think about it the Muslim community does really well because whether a Muslim is a shooter or the victim, liberals fall over themselves to show support for the local Muslim community every time there is a shooting, stabbing or a truck is run through a crowd. Given this kind of unquestioning support you would think that Wynne would be treated really well during the visit but instead, they treated her the way they treat Muslim women much to her shock.

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The Conservative Party on Immigration and New Zealand’s Refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. The fifth party to respond to my questions was the Conservative party. My questions and the Conservative Party’s answers are published in full and un-edited.

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under your party’s policy and why?

Answer:

The Conservative Party would want to prioritise immigrants who can add to our economy and not depend on it. Our priorities for immigrants would be:
a.  Possessing skills or qualifications that we are in need of in New Zealand. These would have to be qualifications recognised in New Zealand to avoid the situation  that currently exists of qualified doctors being unable to practise medicine in New Zealand.

b.  Immigrants with a good grasp of the New Zealand language so that they can maximise the skills/ qualifications they have.
c.  Immigrants of good character. Any red flags raised by New Zealand or other entities should be enough to reject an application.

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Knock me down with a feather, I agree with Rachel Smalley

Andrew Little chases another passing bus

It is rare that I agree with Rachel Smalley, but occasionally she gets something right.

Admittedly it isn’t often, but yesterday she was on the money.

The nine Indian students who are facing deportation for visa fraud and are living temporarily in a Church in the Auckland suburb of Ponsonby.

What a position they’re in, and what a position Immigration New Zealand is in, too, writes Rachel Smalley.

The students signed their visa applications and in doing so, they signed fraudulent documents filled out by their agents. They paid those agents in India to help them to apply for a New Zealand visa, and it is the agents – they say – who are at fault here.

Not so. It is they who are at fault and whether it’s knowingly or unknowingly, the students have committed fraud.  

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The National Party on Immigration and the refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. The fourth party to respond to my questions was the National Party. My questions and the Minister of Immigration Michael Woodhouse’s answers are published below in full and un-edited.

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under your party’s policy and why?

Answer:

Majority of our immigration policies are based on skill level and the Government is constantly making changes to improve the skill level of migrants coming to New Zealand.

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United Future on Immigration and New Zealand’s Refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. The third party to respond to my questions was United Future. My questions and Peter Dunne’s answers are published in full and un-edited.

 

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under your party’s policy and why?

Answer:

UnitedFuture’s immigration policy is one that recognises the value that immigration holds for New Zealand, as highlighted in several recent pieces of research.

Our policy is designed to build upon the benefits New Zealand currently gains from immigration by introducing more space for business in skills-shortage areas to sponsor workers into the country.  That allows a direct matching of vacancy to worker without having too much bureaucracy in the middle.

Further, we would prioritise immediate family members and allow a fast-track option for new migrants who both have the majority of their family in the country and who demonstrate an ability to take care of them.

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In Europe, voters and governments don’t see eye to eye about Muslim immigration

Voters will force this on their governments, one by one.  No matter how many times the liberal media call those who want to halt Muslim immigration racists, nationalists, extremists, far-right and neo-Nazi, the truth is that the majority of voters agree. Read more »