Inland Revenue

Former IRD boss: Google Tax only sounds good but actually isn’t

The hard left want to tax everything, and especially if they are “multi-national” companies.

But they almost never think things through. It takes experts to eventually scotch their dopey ideas.

For the majority of us, paying tax is a necessary evil, but something which can’t be avoided.

So knowing huge companies like Google, Facebook and Apple dodge the taxman here seems outrageous.

But requiring them to pay income tax could do more harm than good.

They’re calling it a Google tax — a way to make the massive global companies pay tax in all the countries they operate.

In theory it sounds appealing but in reality it might not work.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Ignore the hysteria, listen to the experts

Labour are going all in on so-called tax dodgers, conveniently ignoring their own expert tax dodger working from Andrew Little’s office.

The Media party are doing it too, as usual, laundering stolen and illegally obtain documents in order to create murk. Essentially they are playing dirty media.

However the experts don’t agree with their rhetoric.

If someone gets run over by a car, the response by the government should not be to ban all cars on the road.

That’s how tax specialist and former Deputy Commissioner of Policy IRD Robin Oliver describes the early hysteria, as he calls it, to the so-called Panama Papers data dump.

The massive leak of documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca has put the spotlight on foreign trusts registered in New Zealand and whether they are used to avoid tax or cover dodgy dealings.

“There will always be some abuse,” Mr Oliver told NBR Radio’s Andrew Patterson. “But you would expect a reasonable response and, to me, that means continuing down the line we currently have with rules that ensure that the financial information held by NZ trusts is available.

“Now we have a series of laws the government is introducing with I think general support for automatic exchange of information, which means that there will also be more vigorous identity verification. All that info will be sent to IRD and exchanged with other countries.”   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Tax Cheat Paul Staples loses his job

Tax cheat Paul Staples leaves the Manukau District Court with his wife jean Staples

JUST WHEN you thought things couldn’t get any worse for tax cheat Paul Staples, they have.

The 52-year-old former bankrupt and ex-policeman appears in the Manukau District Court on Thursday for sentencing on charges of forgery, tax evasion and knowingly providing false information to Inland Revenue – offences which carry maximum penalties of up to 10 years imprisonment.

In the meantime, Staples has suffered another setback – he’s lost his job with Panmure-based company Eastside Security Ltd.

Owner Gary Moore confirmed yesterday that Staples was no longer working for the company.

He said Staples had been dismissed immediately after he had been told about the criminal charges he was facing.

Between September 2008 and August 2011, Staples filed 27 fraudulent income tax and bogus GST returns with IRD under three different companies.

During that time he also claimed a salary as a shareholder of a company when he wasn’t one, falsified sale and purchase agreements and legal documents and registered companies when he was a bankrupt.

Inland Revenue has assessed the debt at around $320,000, but with penalties and interest it is likely to run to well over half a million dollars.   Read more »

Lies upon lies upon more lies

Paul Thomas Staples and Jean Staples leave the Manukau District Court

Paul Thomas Staples and Jean Staples leave the Manukau District Court

LIES, lies and more lies.

Today in the final installment of our three-part investigation into notorious tax cheat Paul Staples, we reveal more details about the extraordinary lengths the 52-year-old went to in defrauding Inland Revenue out of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Staples has admitted charges of forgery, tax evasion and knowingly providing false information to Inland Revenue – offences which carry maximum penalties of up to 10 years imprisonment.

Between September 2008 and August 2011, Staples filed 27 fraudulent income tax and bogus GST returns with IRD under three different companies.

During that time he also claimed a salary as a shareholder of a company when he wasn’t one, falsified sale and purchase agreements and legal documents and registered companies when he was a bankrupt.

Inland Revenue has assessed the debt at around $320,000, but with penalties and interest it is likely to run to well over half a million dollars.

Two of Staples companies, STH Investments Ltd and 380 Express Ltd, existed in name only – the company had no taxable activity, and no assets or income apart from GST refunds which for the most part were always transferred into the personal account of Staples’ wife and used to pay personal expenses along with a bank loan for a property the couple had bought in Botany.    Read more »

Ex-Cop and Security company boss for the high jump

unnamed-1

Paul Thomas Staples and Jean Staples exiting Manukau District Court Photo/Stephen Cook

A FAILED Auckland businessman is facing the possibility of a lengthy spell behind bars for ripping off the tax department more than $300,000.

Paul Thomas Staples, 52, will appear in the Manukau District Court next month for sentencing on charges of forgery, tax evasion and knowingly providing false information to Inland Revenue – offences which carry maximum penalties of up to ten years imprisonment.

In April this year Auckland man Andrew McGirr was jailed for more than two years for defrauding Inland Revenue of nearly $40,000.

Also in April, former Auckland accountant Paul Lawrence was sentenced to more than two years behind bars after claiming more than $278,000 in fake charitable tax donations.

Staples offending trumps both that of Lawrence and McGirr, not only because more money was involved but because of the deliberate and premeditated nature of his actions over a sustained three-year period.

Between September 2008 and August 2011, Staples – a discharged bankrupt with a history of cooking the books – filed no less than 27 fraudulent income tax and bogus GST returns with IRD under three different companies.

The deception even extended to Staples claiming a salary as a shareholder of a company when he wasn’t one, preparing false sale and purchase agreements, falsifying solicitors settlement statements and forming and registering companies for tax purposes when he was bankrupt and prohibited from doing so.

Worse still, Staples has no assets so the chances of him making restitution to IRD are virtually nil.    Read more »

Anmol Seth: The missing $32k

bnz

CONMAN EXTRAORDANAIRE Anmol Seth assumed the identity of a client in an attempt to access their company bank accounts – but was caught out when he couldn’t answer any of the client’s security questions.

The revelations are contained in the findings of a BNZ investigation into the alleged misappropriation of nearly $32,000 from a hospitality company that went bust last year.

It’s another damning indictment against the self-proclaimed “billionaire of Flatbush” – a man accused of stealing millions from vulnerable and hard-working Indian investors.

A number of complaints against Seth have already been laid with Inland Revenue, BNZ and the Financial Markets Authority demanding action be taken against the Indian businessman for alleged money laundering and GST fraud.

There are also calls for a re-examination of the evidence in relation to the alleged misappropriation of nearly $32,000 from a hospitality company now in receivership after a failed hotel in the South Island last year.    Read more »

Are Auckland prices really peaking?

QV have come out with spurious claims that spikes in speculative trading shows that the Auckland housing market is about to peak.

Behaviour by Auckland’s housing speculators indicates the property market could be about to reach peak point.

New Zealand residential property values rose at their fastest annual pace in eight years in August, pushed higher by overflowing demand in Auckland.

Jan O’Donoghue, QV home value northern operations manager, said speculator trading patterns showed signs that they thought the market could soon turn.

“QV stats show more than 2000 homes have been bought and sold more than once over the past 12 months.

“Often, nothing has been done to improve these properties at all and speculators are just on-selling it and taking the capital gain.

“Rapid on-selling can be a sign that some speculators may believe we are close to reaching the top of the market and decide they have made enough profit,” she said.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Tagged:

Rose hits the Wall. ‘You can’t trust Indians’

Graham Hare, husband of Rose Wall

Graham Hare, husband of Rose Wall

by Stephen Cook

ONE OF the most influential figures in the public health system has been branded a racist after claims she told her husband ‘Indians could not be trusted’.

The woman at the centre of the race row is Rose Wall, appointed by the National Government two years ago to a five-year term as deputy Health and Disability Commissioner.

Wall is also the wife of Auckland lawyer Graham Charles Hare, who was outed a week ago over an alleged plot to extort $500,000 from a former colleague.

The reference to Wall’s apparent dislike of Indians is contained in a sworn affidavit from a former business partner of Hare’s.

Two years ago Hare and the Indian man bought a hotel in the South Island, but even before the deal was signed there were issues.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Time to shoot the Sherriff – A Special Investigation Ctd

grant thornton

by Stephen Cook

A LEADING accountancy firm has been implicated in an alleged plot to swindle hundreds of thousands of dollars from Inland Revenue.

Liquidators from Grant Thornton, which boasts annual worldwide earnings of $4.7 billion and has been acclaimed as one of the best managed international firms, are among those under investigation by IRD and the Serious Fraud Office for their part in an alleged conspiracy to rip off the taxman.

IRD has invoked wide-ranging powers under section six of the Tax Administration Act to investigate experienced liquidators Greg Sherriff and Tim Downes and their handling of what should have been a relatively simple company liquidation back in 2013.

Two years on the case is attracting plenty of attention with claims liquidators in conjunction with an Auckland law firm systematically robbed the company blind and withheld money that should have gone to the taxman.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

IRD bribery & fraud scandal: A Special Investigation, Ctd

inland-revenue-website-address

by Stephen Cook

INLAND REVENUE is officially investigating the actions of those implicated in a messy bribery scandal currently threatening the integrity of the New Zealand taxation system.

Top-level discussions were held in Auckland yesterday between senior IRD investigators and a number of complainants over the alleged criminal conduct of those involved in what appears to be an elaborate plot to defraud taxpayers out of millions of dollars.

But more importantly, at stake is the integrity of the taxation system and the right of all taxpayers to have their liability determined “fairly, impartially and according to law”.

If IRD were to ignore the allegations, it could open itself up to potentially billions of dollars worth of claims from aggrieved taxpayers wanting the same preferential treatment enjoyed by the company at the centre of the latest scandal.

The company had tax liabilities of close to $300,000 but successfully negotiated a final settlement of $30,000.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Tagged: