Internet Mana

How broke was Labour at the election? Very broke, the Greens outspent them

The latest election expenses are out and it is quite revealing.

National spent the most, Labour spent less than half of National, and the Greens out spent Labour.

But the real take out is that money doesn’t buy you results. The Greens show that as does Internet Mana.

Labour spent half as much as National on last year’s election campaign and was outspent by the Greens for the first time.

Parties’ election advertising expenses were released yesterday and show Labour spent $1.27 million – slightly less than the Green Party on $1.29 million and half the National Party’s $2.6 million.

National was the biggest spender, followed by the Conservative Party, which was bankrolled by leader Colin Craig and spent $1.9 million. Funded by $3.5 million from Kim Dotcom, the Internet-Mana alliance spent $660,000 while the Internet Party spent a further $320,000. Of the parties in Parliament, United Future spent the least – just under $2000.

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This comment is not satire but it should be

John-Minto

John Minto

Below is a comment from John Minto, which would be satire at its finest, if it wasn’t for the fact that he actually means every word.

From the outset Mana realised there were big risks in the arrangement because of the massive wealth and polarising character of Kim Dotcom but it was a risk we were prepared to take. I’m proud of the fact we risked our parliamentary representation for something much bigger – challenging corporate wealth and power which is expressed politically through the Labour and National Parties.
-The DB

 

mega-kimble-intro-4f20382-intro-thumb-640xauto-29726

Kim Dotcom’s massive wealth was a risk John Minto was willing to take. -photo wired.com

Forgive me for my contempt, but isn’t using Kims ‘ massive wealth ‘ to challenge ‘ corporate wealth’ like, screwing for virginity?

Andrew Little is the first in Labour to admit Dotcom was poison

Andrew Little’s claims for the leadership just got a whole lot more credible with his claims that Labour should have distanced themselves sooner from Dotcom.

Which is telling, because it wasn’t pure coincidence that Labour’s election slogan was Vote Positive.

Andrew Little says voters wanted “greater clarity” about Labour’s potential coalition partners and the party should have clearly spurned Internet-Mana

Interviewed on TV3’s The Nation, he said Labour shares “a lot of things“ with the Green Party, as well as New Zealand First.

“We shouldn’t have had anything to do with Internet Mana. We didn’t make that clear, and I think people were then a little bit suspicious of us,” Little said.

During the campaign, then Labour leader David Cunliffe said he would not allow Internet Mana into cabinet, but said he could work with Dotcom’s party in a broader coalition deal.

“New Zealanders looked at that whole thing. They didn’t like the idea of a very wealthy individual writing out a massive cheque, funding a campaign that was really about his self-interest and a bunch of other people signing up to it,” Little said.   Read more »

Deception and Demoralisation

Karl du Fresne talks of deception and demoralisation amongst the left in the wake of Dirty Politics and the so-called Moment of Truth.

I WONDER, was this the most demoralising election result ever for the New Zealand left?

There was an excited buzz in the left-wing blogosphere and in social media in the weeks leading up to the election. There seemed to be a sense that victory was in their grasp, even when the polls suggested otherwise. But they were cruelly deceived.

Their optimism is easily explained. In the early stages of the campaign, they saw the fallout from Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics dominating the news bulletins night after night.

After that firestorm had abated, the media turned its attention to Kim Dotcom’s Moment of Truth, with its dazzling line-up of high-profile journalists and leakers from overseas, all eager to tell us how morally bankrupt our government was.

Those on the left observed the adulation heaped on Hager, who was lionised at speaking engagements. They thrilled at the big turnouts attracted by Dotcom and his incongruous handmaiden, Laila Harré. And they deduced from all this that an unstoppable momentum was building, the inevitable result of which would be the unceremonious dispatch of the Key government.

They were wrong. It was a massive indulgence in wishful thinking, and it must have made the left’s defeat even more crushing psychologically.

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Crippled by Crazies

Russel Norman has come out swinging.

In an interview with Willie Jackson at Radio Waatea he described Dotcom and his pals in the Internet Mana party as “crazies” and they crippled the Greens campaign.

Greens co-leader Russel Norman says Internet Mana was a guided missile aimed at the left.

He says he visited Kim Dotcom at the start of the year to try to convince the internet mogul not to start a political party.

The party went ahead under the leadership of former Alliance MP Laila Harre, who had worked during 2013 as the Greens’ Auckland-based issues director.

Mr Norman says dragging Mana leader Hone Harawira into the mess by convincing him to sell his first list position set the scene for disaster.

“I mean we had enough trouble with John Key standing up every day telling all his nonsense about us and on the other had we had to deal with these crazies. Having them on the radio and tv all the time talking their nonsense, it was like ‘Oh god,’ it did make it incredibly difficult to change the Government at that point because a lot of people who might have voted for Labour went ‘Oh god, if a vote for Labour means a vote for Dotcom and Harre, I’m not going to do that,'” he says

Mr Norman says Internet Mana’s party vote strategy was to spend $3 million trying to take votes from potential Green supporters.

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The ‘moments of zen’ in the election

Paul Thomas analyses the election and the “moments of zen”.

The Daily Show‘s Jon Stewart’s signature sign-off is “Your moment of Zen”: a clip of a public figure making a goose of themselves through tone deafness, crassness, vehement ignorance, random imbecility or unconscious irony.

If Stewart had taken notice of our election, he would’ve had more moments of Zen than you could shake a stick at. After a rigorous process of elimination, I’ve chosen a top three.

Third was Internet-Mana party co-leader Laila Harre commiserating with the people of Te Tai Tokerau over the loss of their sitting MP and her co-leader Hone Harawira. Before her next political incarnation Harre might care to familiarise herself with the workings of democracy: the people she was consoling for being deprived of Harawira were the very people who gave him the broom.

Second was Labour leader David Cunliffe’s concession speech in which he did a passable impersonation of a man who’d just won an election. If his year-long impersonation of a leader of the opposition had been half as convincing, neither he nor Labour would be in the dark place they are now.

His shout-out to his staff and Labour’s campaign team was a riot of superlatives – “amazing”, “incredible”, “fantastic” – which raised the question: how catastrophically badly would Cunliffe and Labour have done if he’d surrounded himself with mediocrities?

Number one was Harawira’s comment, early on in the evening, that the people of his electorate “don’t like being ganged up on”. The general reaction to interlopers trying to influence the outcome in Te Tai Tokerau, he said, was “why don’t you guys piss off and leave us to make our own decisions?”.

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Face of the day

Hone Harawira

Hone Harawira

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To Martyn, Martin, Kim, Laila, David, Russel, Metiria, Pam and all their fans

Has Labour lost South Auckland?

Yesterday I wrote about the condescension of David Cunliffe when speaking to Pasifika audiences.

Today in the NZ Herald they discuss how Pasifika have found their political voice and no longer just vote red.

Could this mean that Labour’s fortress of South Auckland has broken walls now?

For a long time – generations, even – the Pasifika vote has always gone to the party draped in red.

In the old days, vans and buses were organised all around South Auckland to make sure as many people as possible turned up to the voting booths. The majority of those Tongan, Samoan, Niuean, Fijian, Cook Island and Tuvaluan voters were completely decked out in red, holding red balloons and wearing red lei.

These days, however, something is changing within the community.

Although there is still a very strong Labour following, there is now growing support for National, as well as a shift to vote for other parties – something almost never heard of before amongst Pasifika.

Community leaders and seasoned politicians admit that people are starting to look at what other parties are offering; meaning the Pacific vote is starting to look a lot more colourful this election.

Over the past few months, the National party has gone in strong into places that have traditionally been Labour’s stronghold and, in earlier years, would have seen anyone in blue practically booted out.

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Ructions in Internet Mana are spilling over, fighting over weed

Cannabis usually chills people out, except in the case of the bastard political child of the Internet and Mana parties it is causing friction.

And we are way past a fraction too much friction.

There has been a major breakdown in the Internet Mana party.

Emails obtained by 3 News show Mana leader Hone Harawira lashing out over the Internet Party’s pro-cannabis policy with one of his trademark expletive-laden rants, blocking an advertising campaign and saying he is “sick of all this s**t about weed”.

The ad includes a pitch to decriminalise cannabis with the words “police no longer wasted on weed”.

Mr Harawira has said he does not support cannabis for personal use, however the Internet Party wants to see it decriminalised.

When it comes to marijuana the Mana and Internet Party leaders are diametrically opposed. Mr Harawira hates it, but for Internet Party leader Laila Harre, cannabis reform is a personal priority.

She said she has made a personal pledge to champion the issue if she is elected.    Read more »