James Cook

Guest Post – There once were men of science who visited these shores

Two-hundred and forty years ago today they anchored in Ship Cove, for some on board it was their third visit here. After securing the ships in the stream they cleaned and fumigated the vessels and made preparations to set ashore, loading up the landing boats with tents, all the paraphernalia of their scientific mission and the implements, equipment and utensils required for their observations. Landing the following day they would strike up a veritable tent village in an area surrounded by rich grass and wild celery. It was a pleasant day in the Marlborough Sounds; the Noon temperature was measured at 65.5(18.6c) on the ship’s thermometers, the air pressure 30.0inHg(1015mb), there was a fresh West-North-west wind and no rain. The seawater temperature, measured outside of the straits approaching the Sounds had been 60.0f(15.5c), a bit chilly for swimming, but consistent with the other readings they had taken while crossing the Tasman Sea since leaving Van Diemens land; their last landfall before leaving for New Zealand.   Read more »

If only they could hear their babies screaming

James Whakaruru: Beaten, stomped, kicked...and dead

James Whakaruru: Beaten, stomped, kicked…and dead

It seems Maori can hear bits of wood weeping…but they can’t hear their babies screaming when they bash them to death.

Britain’s National Maritime Museum hopes a group of London-based Māori can resolve a mystery around artefacts brought back to England by Captain James Cook.

Members of the haka group Ngāti Rānana have been given rare access to the taonga Māori, which are set to go on display in 2018.

Group chairman Lewis Whaitiri said they were shown ancient weapons collected in Captain Cook’s first and second voyages.

“We saw tewhatewha, kotiate, patiti and a taiaha… They were tupuna [ancestors]. You could feel the mauri when you walked in.”

“They had been stored away for so long, some of them had not seen a Māori face or been touched by Māori since the museum has had them so the mauri that was in that place, you could feel the taonga crying for home.

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Map of the Day

Cook_Three_Voyages_59

The routes of Captain James Cook’s voyages. The first voyage is shown in red, second voyage in green, and third voyage in blue. The route of Cook’s crew following his death is shown as a dashed blue line.

James Cook stole Australia from the Abos

Apparently…he did, according to an artist:

IT’S NO surprise to find a bust of Captain James Cook gracing the halls of the NSW Parliament. But Jason Wing’s artwork does not treat the English explorer credited with being the first European to land on Australia’s east coast with reverence.

Wing’s Australia was Stolen by Armed Robbery features a bust of Captain Cook wearing a black balaclava, pictured. ”Australia was stolen from the Aboriginal people by lethal force,” he said.

Wing added the fate of indigenous people had deteriorated since the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788. ”Racism and criminal behaviour by the Australian government is alive and well.”

As Andrew Bolt says “One of these men apparently stole Australia from the other”. James Cook is on the left. Aboriginal artist Jason Wing is on the right.

I can hear the outrage building now

Stuff.co.nz

A new book is seriously going to bend some Maori out of shape. I can;t wait for the headlines expressing outrage over this book.

I wonder if the Egyptians had any kaitiakitanga?

Captain James Cook and Abel Tasman could lose their place in history as the first Europeans to reach New Zealand.

A controversial book, To the End of the Earth, claims to contain evidence that Greeks, Spanish and Egyptians settled in New Zealand long before the Maori people.

The 378-page book, to be released this weekend, was co-authored by researchers Maxwell C Hill, Gary Cook and Noel Hilliam.

It shows ancient maps drawn before the birth of Christ, which the authors said detail the coastlines of Australia and New Zealand.

Skeletons, rock carvings, stone buildings and monuments all attest to people of European origin living in New Zealand for centuries before the arrival of Polynesians, they said.

The artefacts include a rock carving of an ancient Greek ship found in Taupo, a stone pillar with an accurate coastal map of New Zealand showing Lake Taupo in its pre-232AD eruption shape, and carvings on rocks at Raglan.

Hill said a huge boulder weighing several tonnes, deeply cut into a huge circular star calendar and marked with what were believed to be figures and rebuses, was the most stunning find.

He said there was also evidence that showed Maui was not the legendary Maori god-explorer, but an actual Egyptian naval navigator, who steered a flotilla of Greek ships to discover new shores, Hill said.

The book quotes Professor Barry Fell, of Harvard University in the US, who interpreted graffiti drawn on limestone in caves at McCluer Bay, on the coast of Indonesia.

Hill said Fell’s find names Maui as a navigator from the Red Sea under the flag of Ptolemy III in 232BC.

A cave inscription near Santiago, Chile also shows the Maori god-explorer was an Egyptian navigator, saying the point was “the southern limit of the coast reached by Maui,” Hill said.