Judith Tizards

Long Term Effects of the Tizard Timebomb

The Herald editorial talks about the paucity of talent in Labour’s list:

The Labour Party has 43 seats in the present Parliament. If it wins at least that many at this year’s election it will bring in eight new names from the list it published on Sunday: Andrew Little, Deborah Mahuta-Coyle, Michael Wood, Kate Sutton, Jerome Mika, Josie Pagani, Lynette Stewart and Jordan Carter. If the party maintains its improvement in the latest poll – suggesting pressure on its leader over his handling of Darren Hughes has done Phil Goff and his party no harm – Labour can look forward to many more than 43 MPs.

The names Christine Rose, Glenda Alexander, Susan Zhu, Rino Tirikatene, Sehai Orgad and Megan Woods could be in the House too. There are not many pale males among all those names. Party lists are intended to bring a better gender balance and more ethnic diversity into democratic representation. Labour’s makes a meal of it.

It has also learned from recent experience not to put old names low on its list where they could be next in line to replace any list MP who fails to serve a full term. There are no Judith Tizards in a position to return at the expense of fresh talent this time.

They also note the long term effects of the T-Bomb. There doesn’t appear to be any Tizards lurking down the list to embarrass them after the election.

But the downside of that lesson is that there are no new names high on the list. With few exceptions, sitting MPs occupy all the places down to number 35. Most of them are also standing in electorates, which means that if any are rejected by the voters they will return on the list. The real winners of any party’s list selection, in the public eye at least, are probably electorate MPs who want no place on it.

They go on to commend Lianne Dalziel as I have for her decision to abandon being ont eh List. She knows better than most that scum list MPs are hated.

The list system remains an unsatisfactory element of MMP to members and voters alike. The lists are drawn up by party panels out of the public eye. Electorate candidates are selected in similar secrecy, but at least those selected have to pass muster at public election meetings and voters have put a tick beside their names.

The list system is the single worst aspect about MMP and one of the reasons why it should be chucked aside.

 

 

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.