Junk food

A ban on junk food advertising? How is that going to work then?

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Pies at New World Warkworth

Health groups are calling for a ban on junk food advertising and sports sponsorship in a bid to mimic the success of the ban on tobacco ads.

Several groups have made the call in submissions to the Advertising Standards Authority, which is reviewing its code for advertising to children.

Health groups said although big sports events such as rugby or league games might not be solely targeted at children, they were family affairs and children would be influenced by marketing.

They said such selling was one of the many ways children were bombarded by junk food messages.

Medical Association chair Stephen Child said even though such marketing is now common, sport would survive without it. Read more »

Told ya, now they are coming for your food

I have always said that health campaigners will move on from tobacco and start coming after whatever they want to control next.

Be it fast food, or sugar or fat they want to apply the same tactics of control to those products like they have for tobacco.

Less than two years ago I gave a speech to the Food and Grocery Council and told them that if they didn’t back the fight against plain packing in tobacco then they were going to be next.

Many of them scoffed at me…I’ll bet they wish they’d listened now.

Aaron Shultz, an Australian health campaigner, is calling for plain packaging featuring health warnings for junk food. He has posted a picture on Facebook of what he believes the packaging could look like – dropping the branding in favour of a picture reminding people of the price they could pay for a junk food habit.

Shultz is a health campaigner, who runs an organisation called Game Changer. It has a broader aim: to halt the promotion of alcohol, junk food and gambling through sport. He argues that by associating sport with these unhealthy brands, it normalises junk food, and contributes to the growing obesity problem in Australia.    Read more »

NZ Junk food manufacturers in for tough 2015

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Companies making ‘junk food’ look as though they’re in for a tough year.

If it wasn’t the Aussie council seeking to ban chips, chocolate and sugary drinks from parks, it is now UK ‘experts’ calling for a ban on junk food adverts.

The usual health experts suspects are calling for bans on junk food TV ads, saying they shouldn’t be aired before 9pm in the hope that parents will stop getting pressured by their kids wanting ‘unhealthy food and sugary drinks’.

The British Heart Foundation is saying ‘seven in ten parents with children aged four to 16 have been pestered by their children to buy junk food they have seen advertised on TV.’    Read more »

Why is it that Labour parties seem to have dud ideas?

Labour is dead set useless, they focus on retard policies and treat voters like their policies.

In the UK it isn’t much different, hell, they even share policies with New Zealand Labour.

Ed Milliband is proving to be just a savvy with the voters as David Cunliffe.

Junk food adverts aimed at children face being banned before the watershed, under proposals announced by Labour today.

Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham said too many children were ‘exposed to adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt’ – particularly during popular Saturday night shows like the X Factor.

The proposal was contained in a raft of public health measures announced today aiming to tackle Britain’s obesity epidemic.

Yeah because the nanny state is always a vote winner.

Mr Burnham said Labour would impose ‘a time watershed for advertising of products high in sugar, fat and/or salt’ if measures cannot not be agreed with regulators to dramatically cut the number of junk food adverts aimed at children.

The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt took to Twitter to condemn the proposals.

He said that “banning and legislation not always the answer” and that “backing families to make better choices brings lasting change”.

But Mr Burnham accused the Government of being ‘too close to powerful vested interests’ to stand up for children.

Read more »

Doug Sellman teams up with discredited troughers

Professor J. Douglas Sellman

Professor J. Douglas Sellman

While on the topic of prohibitionist and supermarket hater Doug Sellman, his organisation Alcohol Action NZ is gearing up for a big fight with the Government over the report of the Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship.

Travel and lifestyle blogger and pinko David Farrar commented on all the bans the forum recommended the other day, saying it was all a bit depressing, and that it will eventually end up with plain packaging for drinks and food.

Farrar’s post would have incensed Doug Sellman, who is now saying that Alcohol Action NZ is ‘sponsoring an independent expert committee on alcohol advertising and sponsorship (IECAAS), which is monitoring the work of the Ministerial Forum’. From this an ‘independent report’ will be produced. It’s worth a look to see who is on this so called ‘expert committee” that will produce an ‘independent report’.

Oh dear look who we have here. Read more »

Hold the horses – Eating addiction blamed for Obesity

Nigel Latta is simply brilliant. He’s managed to hoe into $1.6m of NZ On Air funding to produce TV shows including his most recent hit series ‘The Hard Stuff with Nigel Latta’.

For the most part, he ends his shows by wondering how can this sort of thing can happen in New Zealand and then bashes up on the Government. It’s a ratings winner.

But all this debate on obesity and saying it’s not our fault may have just hit a slight snag.

I’ve come across an article in the UK’s Guardian has the grand title ‘Eating, not sugar, is addictive’.    Read more »

Charge the parents, don’t tax the drinks

I have long held the position that it is fat bastards who should pay for their health concerns as a result of their poor self control. Introduce a Fat bastard Tax not what the health busybodies want which is a tax on all products containing sugar or fat…or whatever ingredient they will hate on next.

In the case of children then tax the parents who let their kids become fat bastards.

Christina Odone blogs at The Telegraph:

“What do we hate? The Nanny state!” might be a suitable marching song for conservatives — until, that is, children’s well-being is compromised. When parents abuse their role as their child’s protectors the state is right to intervene. Which is why the couple in Norfolk, arrested for allowing their son’s weight to reach 15 stone, should face court.

Imagine parents who regularly gave their son heroin; or a bottle of vodka. Anyone observing such behaviour would instinctively call the police to save the child. The same now has to be true of a child whose parents are feeding him too many of the wrong things. We now know that food — junk food, fatty food, sugar, additives – can prove as damaging to a child’s health as heroin or alcohol. Indeed, sugar is so toxic that experts claim it is as bad as tobacco: it leads not only to obesity, but to diabetes too.

Parents who ignore these facts and ply their children with excess food (or just really bad food) are abusing their children as clearly as those who let them take drugs. In the case of the couple in Norfolk, their son suffers from autism: he is all the more at the mercy of his parents’ care. They defend his weight by claiming that it is down to bad genes. Wrong: it’s down to the parents.

Read more »

UN suggests taxing food like tobacco

Plain packaging coming for McDonalds?

Plain packaging coming for McDonalds?

People said it would never happen, that anti-tobacco tactics would spread into other areas.

Well, i have been proved right and manufacturers of food products should be very afraid now the UN has taken an interest in taxing and controlling food products like tobacco.

But if you thought that was bad, they have also suggested that unhealthy diets pose a greater risk to global health than the increasingly regulated sale of tobacco and governments should move fast to tax harmful food products.

In a statement issued on the opening of the annual summit of the World Health Organisation (WHO), Belgian professor Olivier de Schutter called for efforts to launch negotiations on a global pact to tackle the obesity epidemic.

“Unhealthy diets are now a greater threat to global health than tobacco. Just as the world came together to regulate the risks of tobacco, a bold framework convention on adequate diets must now be agreed,” he said.   Read more »

Food Police Seek Golden Trough

Deborah Coddington has slammed academic activists who are running amok in the media telling us what to eat.

Troughers are all the same. Doesn’t matter if they’re anti-tobacco, anti-booze or the trendy new anti-bigfood. All are desperate to stay in the golden taxpayer funded trough.

While Super Trougher Boyd Swinburn is well out in front in the troughing stakes, many academic troughers are keen to follow his lead. One example is Otago Uni’s Gabrielle Jenkin who bangs on about Big Food being the new Big Tobacco.

Gabrielle Jenkin, Wellington health specialist, says Big Food is “more powerful” and will be “more aggressive than Big Tobacco” when cornered. Politicians are “cowed by Big Food” and New Zealand is “appalling, we’re sniffing KFC wherever we go”.

The more media they get, the more funding they seek. Whether it’s from the Lottery Grants Board or undisclosed funding from the University of Otago’s Activist’s Research Grant, rest ashore Gabrielle Jenkin is deep in the trough.

With a PHD thesis called “Individuals, the environment or inequalities? Industry and public health framing of obesity and its presence in New Zealand government policy on food nutrition’ and current projects looking at internet junk food marketing, her utterances are all going to be predictably anti industry.  Read more »

Enterprising, but wait till the whingers try to shut him down

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The market gives up all sorts of opportunities and customers wants and needs must be met.

Entrepreneurs find those niches and cater to the wants and needs of those customers…until the wowsers move in and try to shut them down.

With a car boot full of fizzy drinks, crisps and sweets, it is hardly surprising that he is popular with pupils.

But parents and teachers are furious at the mobile trader who has set up shop at the gates of their school.  Read more »