Le Figaro

Asterix creator comes out of retirement for Charlie Hebdo

The Huffington Post reports:

The 87-year-old cartoonist behind the famous French comic “Asterix” has come out of retirement to pay tribute to those killed during the attacks on Charlie Hebdo offices earlier this week.

Albert Uderzo published two images in France, and shared both with the official “Asterix” Twitter account, expressing to fans: “Moi aussi je suis un Charlie” (I too am Charlie).

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What actually happens when you let socialists run the country

France is the canary in the coal mine. They have embraced all the worst aspects of socialism with predictable results.

Rampant immigration from Islamic countries, extremely high taxes, reduced working hours, benefits, subsidies, the whole shebang.

Little wonder their troops prefer to march backwards rather than protect that way of life.

Now it is infecting their prison system.

French prison has become a “holiday camp”, guards have warned, after inmates posted more than 100 selfies on Facebook showing them posing with wads of cash, dope and mobile phones.

Two investigations have been launched this week into how the photographs and video clips featuring the inmates of Baumettes prison near Marseille, southern France, reached the social media website, and how the objects got through security.

In one image, a prisoner in Y-fronts waves around a large bundle of 50 euro notes; another photo shows an inmate smoking a hookah and playing with a mobile phone while another shows cannabis on a table in the prison.

A fourth shows a group of muscular, bare-chested inmates in the prison courtyard posing as if in a boy’s band. According to La Provence, the local newspaper that broke the story, photos of knives also exist.

The Facebook page entitled “MDR o Baumettes” (LOL in the Baumettes) had garnered almost 5,000 likes in the past few weeks before it was closed down after prison staff stumbled on the page over New Year.

While it may have won fans on social media, the Facebook page sparked concern among prison authorities, who launched an internal probe while also filing a criminal complaint.

“We took immediate action after discovering this page by opening an investigation and informing the prosecutors in Marseille,” said Philippe Perron, the local prisons administrative chief.

Guards conducted a search of five cells identified on Facebook, confiscating three mobiles and a USB key. Several inmates featuring in the photos face disciplinary action.

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Tough guy ISIS jihadists crying to mummy because their iPod batteries went dead

The ISIS thugs aren’t so tough, now they are moaning to mummy back home about the cold, flat iPod batteries and their inability to fight.

They’re French of course.

Letters from French jihadists home to their parents have revealed the misery, boredom and fear suffered by Islamist recruits as the gloss fades from their big adventure.

In a series of letters seen by Le Figaro newspaper, some of the 376 French currently fighting in Syria have begged for advice on how to return. Others have complained that, rather than participating in a noble battle, they have been acting as jihadi dogsbodies.

“I’ve basically done nothing except hand out clothes and food,” wrote one, who wants to return from Aleppo. “I also help clean weapons and transport dead bodies from the front. Winter’s arrived here. It’s begun to get really hard.”

Another writes: “I’m fed up. They make me do the washing up.”

One Frenchman whinged that he wanted to come home because he was missing the comforts of life in France.

“I’m fed up. My iPod doesn’t work any more here. I have to come back.”   Read more »

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Hollande busted by bludger magazine, but at least they aren’t a Mickey mouse paper

Francois Hollande must be annoyed to know that Closer Magazine, the outlet that busted his rooting, is also a bludger magazine receiving state grants.

Closer, the magazine that has put the French president in a pickle with its photos of an alleged dalliance with an actress, gets more than half a million euros a year in state aid, part of the nearly three quarters of a billion euros that France annually hands out to prop up the written press.

The dailies Le Monde and Le Figaro are the top beneficiaries, getting 18 million euros (£15m) each, with several million of that going to subsidise costs of posting copies to readers, according to figures for 2012 from the ministry of culture and communication.

The state auditor has lambasted the subsidies, saying in a report last year that the written press got five billion euros between 2009 and 2011 in handouts that had “not shown their efficiency” and had led to a culture of “dependence” among editors.

Two hundred publications got state aid in 2012, according to the latest figures, under a policy that began during World War II to foster media diversity.

But the list of publications that benefit raises questions as to how this state aid is boosting democratic or intellectual debate.

The funniest one is a magazine for fans of Mickey Mouse.

Some critics ask what exactly celebrity gossip magazines, or a magazine devoted to Mickey Mouse, le Journal de Mickey, which got 555,059 euros in 2012, do to improve society.

A magazine listed as the Economist is listed as getting 197,306 euros, although it was not clear that this was the British news weekly of that name.

French Industry Minister Arnaud Montebourg last week defended the subsidies, saying that the French press was going through an “industrial crash” that he compared to the collapse of the steel industry in the 1980s.

“If we stopped the subsidies… while the press is in difficulty, that would pose a real democratic problem,” he said.

Subsidies are evil…they must fought at every level.