legislation

What is the difference between Saudi Arabia and ISIS?

Question: What is the difference between Saudi Arabia and ISIS?

Answer: ISIS hasn’t yet been elected to the United Nation’s Human Rights Council.

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai 

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Another perspective of France’s intentions regarding the Burqa and the Burkini

The below article is another perspective of France’s intentions regarding the Burqa and the Burkini. It is not arguing right or wrong but attempts to explain the French perspective. Only you the reader can decide whether the French perspective is moral or not.


This goes back to the philosophical issue of the tolerance of intolerance, or more broadly of whether objective moral truths exist or not. Western democracies, such as France, have self-determined that there are objective moral truths in the universe, of which include concepts of non-intervention (on the person, and when possible); of personal freedom; and of religious freedom.

The problem, however, is that western democratic philosophies don’t have room in them for unlimited freedom or tolerance. Some things may not be tolerated. This is lost on many observers of western democratic philosophy, especially the uninformed who see the Bill of Rights and incorrectly assume that the protections and tolerances they afford are unlimited (which is not the case; there are many exceptions in place, both legally and ethically, concerning the rights laid out in that particular document). As an example relating specifically to religious tolerance, even a “deeply held” religious belief in the spiritual power of snake handling is not protected in the States because of the great risk untrained professionals have, both towards themselves and others, of injury when handling snakes.

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai 

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Politicians not responding fast enough to public Medical Marijuana pressure

Seventy-five people have been granted permission to use medicinal cannabis in recent years but relieved recipients say many more would benefit if the cost was not so high.

Ministry of Health figures show it received 79 applications to use medicinal cannabis between the beginning of 2013 and March this year and authorised 75.

Families who have struggled through the bureaucratic red tape to gain permission to have the medication say the costs remain too high a hurdle for too many. In one case, a family has gained district health board support, another has turned to public charity.

Northland woman Alisha Butt has been using Sativex since September to control severe epilepsy and recently became the first person in the country to receive publicly-funded medical cannabis.

Her parents, Sushila and Royd Butt, believed a lack of funding for the drug was preventing others from applying to use it. Mrs Butt said it cost more than $1000 for a month’s supply.

And Helen Kelly, who can afford $12k per annum for her final years was told to take a hike.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Photo Of The Day

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High Times

 The Sisters of Cannabis

Self-proclaimed Nuns Fervently Fight for their Right to Grow Cannabis

The Sisters of the Valley’s “abbey” is a modest three-bedroom house on the outskirts of Merced, in a cul-de-sac next to the railroad tracks. (Sister Kate calls the frequent noise from passing trains “part of our penance”.) When visitors come to the door, Sister Kate asks them to wait outside until she can “sage” them with the smoke from a piece of wood from a Russian tree given to her by a shaman.

Sister Kate lives here with her “second sister”, Sister Darcy, and her youngest son.

But these aren’t your average nuns. The women grow marijuana in the garage, produce cannabidiol tinctures and salves in crockpots in the kitchen, and sell the merchandise through an Etsy store. (Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of the active ingredients in marijuana that is prized for medicinal qualities and is not psychoactive.) The women perform their tasks wearing long denim skirts, white collared shirts and nun’s habits. And while their “order” is small – last week they ordained their third member, a marijuana grower in Mendocino County known as Sister Rose – they share the same dream as many California startup founders: scaling.

The sisters say they are in touch with women in New Jersey and Washington state who may be interested in joining up. “They’re out buying jean skirts and white blouses,” said Sister Kate. “We want there to be women in every city selling medicine.”

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Who do you have sex with? And why this may be important?

ACT candidate Stephen Berry writes

I was an audience member at Auckland’s LGBTI meeting last night. It featured Jamie Whyte from ACT, Kevin Hague from the Greens, Miriam Pierard from Internet Mana, Paul Hutchinson from National (retiring at this election so clearly National saw this as a bottom priority for them) and Kelly Ellis from Labour.

Unfortunately it was a poorly attended and largely dreary affair. In 21st century New Zealand politics, homosexuality is so acceptable as to hardly be an issue at all. We watched politicians from across the political spectrum largely agree with each other and Jamie set a new record for being in full agreement with Kevin Hague. The final step that I could identify in legal discrimination against homosexuals is that in a homosexual relationship, only one parent can adopt while the other may take legal guardianship. This is unfair but hardly something to form a mob with burning torches over.

Jamie’s message was spot on when he said that there should be no discrimination whatsoever by the state for any reason. I was glad when he bravely pointed out that this shouldn’t be applied to the sphere of individual’s private lives. Everyone, every day, discriminates against others for a host of minor reasons. If you’re approached by a man in a bar who you find physically unattractive you’d be likely to reject their advances based on that. I would hope nobody would suggest that you’re obligated to accept someone’s physical advances. The Human Rights Act could not possibly list all the different reasons private discrimination should be banned and it shouldn’t even begin to start. Freedom of association is far more important than hurt feelings at your company being rejected.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

You thought 3D printed guns were a problem? How about this…

Event management, schools and AA meetings will have a whole different challenge in the near future

As if alcohol wasn’t already easy enough to come by, the U.S. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau has reportedly approved a new product called Palcohol, an alcoholic powder that comes in flavors including Cosmopolitan and Kamikaze.

Curiously, Palcohol’s current website is light on details but the urge to ‘drink responsibly’ does not appear to be among the company’s top priorities.

‘Maybe you’re a college football fan. So many stadiums don’t even serve alcohol. What’s that about; watching football without drinking?! That’s almost criminal. Bring Palcohol in and enjoy the game.’

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.