Lima

Photo Of The Day

Beto Ortiz and Ruth Thalía Sayas Sánchez on El Valor de la Verdad. LUKA GONZALEZ/ARCHIVOLATINO/REDUX.

Beto Ortiz and Ruth Thalía Sayas Sánchez on El Valor de la Verdad. LUKA GONZALEZ/ARCHIVOLATINO/REDUX.

The Contestant

Ruth Thalía, a teenager from the outskirts of Lima, Peru, became an overnight sensation on a hit television game show. Then, she disappeared.

The Peruvian version of the international television game show franchise The Moment of Truth arrived in Lima in mid-2012. By that time, the program had been produced in dozens of countries around the world, including the United States, where it aired on Fox in 2008 and 2009. In Peru, the show was called El Valor de la Verdad (“the value of the truth”), and the format was essentially the same as it had been everywhere else: A contestant is brought into the station and asked a set of questions, some banal, some uncomfortable, some bordering on cruel, all while hooked to a polygraph.

The answers are cataloged. Then, a few days later, the contestant is brought back to go through the questions once more, this time before a studio audience. The answers given are compared to the results of the polygraph, and for each truthful response, the contestant wins money. If she lies— or rather, if the polygraph says she lies— she loses it all. Naturally, the more money at stake, the more compromising the questions become. The contestant has the option of calling it off after each answer.

In Peru, the show’s host was Beto Ortiz, who in a recent national poll was named the country’s most powerful TV journalist. A balding, heavyset man in his mid-40s, Beto has long been one of the more successful and controversial figures in Peru. He is sharp, inquisitive, funny, and has gained millions of fans; the television critic Fernando Vivas, who writes for El Comercio, Peru’s most influential newspaper, described Beto as “a monster on the scene, with all the ambivalence implied by the word ‘monster.’”

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Photo Of The Day

Photo by Harold Sells Jr., courtesy of Juliane Koepke

Photo by Harold Sells Jr., courtesy of Juliane Koepke

The Girl Who Fell From The Sky

Juliane Koepcke on January 4, 1972, on the plane to Pucallpa just after she was found in the jungle.

When she was 17, Juliane dropped 10,000 feet into the Amazon rain forest. She describes how she survived—alone.

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Turns out the poles aren’t melting, not that our media or government will say anything

New Zealand sent 18 people to Lima in Peru for a talkfest about doing “SOMETHING, ANYTHING, PLEASE” about global warming. Eighteen people flying across the Pacific ocean to talk about how we can contribute to stopping the poles melting.

It never occurs to these morons that stopping such talk-fests would be a good start.

We are about to likely send even more people to Paris for the next talk-fest, but it turns out the poles don’t need saving, not that you will ever read about in NZ media or hear from our government.

In fact, the poles are “much more stable” than climate scientists once predicted and could even be much thicker than previously thought.

For years, scientists have suggested that both poles are melting at an alarming rate because of warming temperatures – dangerously raising the Earth’s sea levels while threatening the homes of Arctic and Antarctic animals.

But the uncertainty surrounding climate change and the polar ice caps reached a new level this month when research suggested the ice in the Antarctic is actually growing.

And there could even be evidence to suggest the polar bear population is not under threat.

Ted Maksym, an oceanographer at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, conducted a study in which he sent an underwater robot into the depths of the Antarctic sea to measure the ice.

His results contradicted previous assumptions made by scientists and showed that the ice is actually much thicker than has been predicted over the last 20 years.

Dr Benny Peiser, from the Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF), said this latest research adds further proof to the unpredictability of the supposed effects of global warming.

He said: “The Antarctic is actually growing and all the evidence in the last few months suggests many assumptions about the poles was wrong.

“Global sea ice is at a record high, another key indicator that something is working in the opposite direction of what was predicted.”   Read more »

Drone Footage Shows Extent of Damage From Greenpeace Vandalism at Nazca Lines

Eco-terrorists Greenpeace are probably more trouble than they have ever been in before, and they are issuing grovelling apologies.

The damage they have caused at Nazca is considerable despite their claims and Peruvian authorities are going to slam them.

A drone has been used to record the damage without causing further damage.

VICE reports:

Greenpeace angered the Peruvian government last week when some of its activists trekked through Peru’s ancient Nazca Lines — a UNESCO World Heritage site — to stage a publicity stunt timed to coincide with UN climate change talks being held in the South American nation’s capital of Lima. The stunt resulted in calls for legal action, and officials have since released new drone footage showing the extent of damage caused at the site.   Read more »

Aussies flip the bird at UN climate fund

Good on the Aussie government, they have flipped the bird at the UN climate fund refusing to contribute anymore to it.

Australia has refused to pay into the UN’s Green Climate Fund, designed to pay for climate change adaptations for developing nations, preferring to cut out the ‘Green blob’ middleman and finance initiatives directly. The Chinese delegation said that this was “not good news”. Speaking at the UN Climate Summit in Peru, the Australian delegates also called for commitments from all major economies including China on emissions. (h/t Jo Nova)

Speaking to Associated Press before the summit in Lima, Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, said: “The Green Climate Fund is about supporting developing countries build resilience to climate change. Australia is already doing that through our aid program. From my experience, bilateral work is able to customize responses when we’re working directly with another partner country.”

So far about $10 billion a year has been pledged by rich countries, but the ambition is to go much further. Su Wei, China’s lead negotiator said: “It is not good news [about] Australia, if it is true that they refuse to provide any money to the GCF.

“It also has very important impacts in the negotiating process. It’s a trust-building process. There is still a large gap toward the 2020 targets of $100 billion a year.”

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