lovers

Photo of the Day

Carole Tregoff puts her head on her manacled wrist and breaks into tears after her arraingment.

Carole Tregoff puts her head on her manacled wrist and breaks into tears after her arraignment.

The Fascinating Finch Affair

Rampant greed, sex, and a considerable dose of comedy ensured that this trial of a wealthy doctor and his mistress as joint defendants on charges of murder dominated newspaper headlines for months.

Here’s one that takes you back to, when automobile tailfins were at their height, Ike was still in the White House, and newspapers were full of stories about the doctor, his girl friend, and his murdered wife.

Dr. Bernard Finch was a middle-aged Los Angles–area surgeon who was having a torrid romance with his shapely young receptionist, Carole Tregoff. The only problem was that Finch was already married, and his wealthy and socially prominent wife would clean him out financially in the event of a divorce.

What to do? Murder seemed like the most profitable solution, but a hired assassin failed to get the job done. So the determined lovers were left to do it themselves.

On February 26, 1961, Carole Tregoff?received a letter from Dr. Bernard Finch.? In it, he told her of his undying love, of his thoughts about their future together, of how, from the beginning, he had considered her the most wonderful girl he had ever known.? It was an anniversary letter, he said, for it celebrated the very first time they had lunched t?te-a-t?te?four years before.? Under ordinary circumstances the letter would have been no more remarkable than any of the billions of exchanges between men and their women since the first cave man chiseled a valentine to his chick.? But the circumstances weren?t ordinary.? Both Dr. Finch and Carole Tregoff were serving life sentences in California penitentiaries: he for obtaining an ?instant divorce: with the help of a .38-caliber bullet; she for conspiring with him to commit the crime.

Carole had been introduced to Finch three weeks after she was hired as a receptionist at the West Covina Medical Center in Los Angeles.? Finch and his brother-in-law were partners in the Center and had borrowed a quarter of a million dollars to set it up.? When the doctor and the ravishing redhead met he said, ?Hello, and that was that for about seven months.? Carole soon heard gossip at the Center about the doctor?s marriage ? not good ? and that he was, in fact, dating a couple of the Center?s pretty employees.? Since she was having marital problems of her own at the time, the gossip made little impression on her.? But, from a distance, the handsome doctor did.

Carole, eighteen when the employment agency sent her to be interviewed at the Center, was tall, red-headed, extremely pretty, with an outstanding figure ? if you know what I mean.? She was married to a chap named Jimmy Pappa, whom she had first dated during high school.? The marriage wasn?t working.? Not at all.? They shared an apartment and little else.

Dr. Finch at forty had a lucrative surgical practice, was a ranking tennis amateur, and had a winning way with the ladies.? He was, in short, notably successful both as surgeon and operator.? The home in which he and his wife lived, with their small son and her young daughter by a previous marriage, was quite elegant.? They each had a car, he a Cadillac, she a Chrysler.? They had a dog.? And they had a lovely young Swedish girl, a part-time college student, to take care of the two children and help around the house.? In the end, it was this girl more than anyone who cooked the doctor?s goose.

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Photo Of The Day

During the 1960s, Campbell was considered one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood. She was well connected among other stars, politicians, and socialites, and her relationship with Giancana put her on the FBI's radar. J. Edgar Hoover quickly learned about Campbell's relationship with Kennedy, and set up surveillance on her home. Additionally, Campbell was relentlessly harassed and questioned by the FBI, and when she became concerned about the whole ordeal, Kennedy assured her it was nothing to worry about. However, it was all too much for Campbell and after one last visit to the White House, she broke things off with Kennedy.

During the 1960s, Campbell was considered one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood. She was well connected among other stars, politicians, and socialites, and her relationship with Giancana put her on the FBI’s radar. J. Edgar Hoover quickly learned about Campbell’s relationship with Kennedy, and set up surveillance on her home. Additionally, Campbell was relentlessly harassed and questioned by the FBI, and when she became concerned about the whole ordeal, Kennedy assured her it was nothing to worry about. However, it was all too much for Campbell and after one last visit to the White House, she broke things off with Kennedy.

?The Exner Files

Judith Campbell Exner, JFK and the Mob

For many years, rumours circulated that Judith Campbell had ?been involved in a plot hatched between her two lovers, John F. Kennedy and Sam Giancana, to kill the Cuban leader, Fidel Castro. In 1991 she came forward and described how she had sat on the edge of the bathtub in a Chicago hotel while the president and the Mafia don talked in the bedroom.

Kennedy’s involvement with the Mob in a plot to kill the Cuban president has often been put forward as one of the reasons for his own assassination in Dallas in November1963.

The three gunshots fired in Dallas 53 years ago meant a Presidential legacy unfulfilled ? and a personal life unresolved.

The sorry mess of sexual exploits that President John F. Kennedy left behind took years to emerge. The supporting cast was vast, and one of them, a woman who was, next to Marilyn Monroe, the most famous one, though not by her choice.

Judith Campbell Exner was the first of JFK?s lovers to be publicly identified, and so she was pilloried by a public furious at learning that at least one wing of Camelot had more in common with the Playboy Club.

A beautiful woman is introduced to a handsome, charismatic Senator running for President by an Academy Award winning movie star. They fall into an affair. Meanwhile, the beautiful woman is also introduced to the head of the Chicago mob by the same man. The beautiful woman carries messages and arranges meetings between the now President of the United States and the Chicago mobster. Sounds like the plot of a thriller, or a conspiracy theorists wet dream doesn?t it? However in this case, it happens to be true. Allegedly.

This much can be proved.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Unknown Source. Susan Travers in North Africa. Travers was an Englishwoman and the only woman to serve officially with the French Foreign Legion.

Photo: Unknown Source.
Susan Travers in North Africa. Travers was an Englishwoman and the only woman to serve officially with the French Foreign Legion.

‘I Think Actually They Thought I was a Man’

She was the Mistress of a French General; she led 4,000 troops to safety; and she was the only Woman to join the Foreign Legion.

As a well-bred Englishwoman educated in the nuances of understatement, Susan Travers seemed unimpressed that she was the only woman ever to join the French Foreign Legion.?She had spent World War II as a volunteer driver with Free French legionnaires who were fighting in North Africa and Europe. But in the summer of 1945, she faced demobilization and did not relish the prospect.

”I shall leave all my friends — I shall go back and live with my family, and it will be dull,” she recalled telling the legion’s recruiting officer, who happened to be a friend. He promptly invited her to sign up and passed her an application form. ”I didn’t say I was a woman,” she said, although her nickname was ”La Miss.” ”I didn’t have to pass a medical. I put down that I was a warrant officer in logistics. That was all.”

Indeed, it was pretty straightforward in comparison with her life leading up to that moment. It seemed far more unusual that a free-spirited young woman who spent the 1930’s playing tennis and partying around Europe should end up in the early 1940’s on the front line of the North African campaign carrying on a clandestine love affair with a married man who happened to be the top French military commander in the region.

For this, too, though, Ms. Travers had a simple explanation. ”My family was very dull,” she said of her reason for socializing in Europe. ”England was very dull.” As for becoming a military driver in combat zones, she said, ”I wanted adventure. I wanted more action.” And her romance with Gen. Marie-Pierre Koenig, a man who became such a war hero that a Paris square carries his name? ”It was a relationship between a man and a woman,” she said.

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Photo Of The Day

renczi-head

Romania-born serial killer Vera Renzi (sometimes spelled Renici) was a very busy empowered woman who knew what she wanted and made sure she got it ? until the oppressive police force interfered.

By the time the promiscuous Vera ? she was known to locals as ?The Mysterious Huntress? ? was arrested in 1925, at the age of 30, she had murdered at least 35 members of the patriarchal sex: her 10-year-old son, two husbands and 32 sex partners. She kept all the bodies in her wine cellar, stored in hermetically zinc containers, each labeled with the victim?s name and the dates indicating the period of time they had been lovers.

Renczi holds the special distinction of having bedded 33 of her victims before having finished them off.

Asked why she killed so many innocent persons, she replied:

?Out of jealousy, for I know that tomorrow they would run after another woman. So I said to myself they had better sleep quietly in my cellar without having to excite themselves.?

She said she killed her son because he knew about the contents of the cellar and she was in constant danger of discovery.

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