Malaysian Airlines

Aviation expert wants to know who took flight MH370

How can a plane full of people just disappear?  Do the experts know more than they are telling?

Tim Clark has been a senior manager at the airline Emirates since 1985 and has been instrumental in developing it into one of the world’s largest airlines. Today, the 64-year-old is seen as a knowledgeable expert and critic of the aviation industry. His view of the vanished Malaysian Airlines flight MH 370 is a provocative one. The plane that disappeared was a Boeing 777 and Emirates operates 127 such aircraft, more than any other airline in the world.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: It’s now October, seven months after the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines flight MH 370, and we still don’t know what happened. What can still be done to gain some degree of clarity?

Clark: MH 370 remains one of the great aviation mysteries. Personally, I have the concern that we will treat it as such and move on. At the most, it might then make an appearance on National Geographic as one of aviation’s great mysteries. We mustn’t allow this to happen. We must know what caused that airplane to disappear.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: And what do you think happened?

Clark: My own view is that probably control was taken of that airplane.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: By whom? What do you think happened? Read more »

Hey New Zealand! “What’s on your Bucket List?” asks Malaysian Airlines

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You can’t make this up – it can only be real

Malaysia Airlines has changed the name of a ticket-sale promotion that invoked an “inappropriate” death reference by asking travellers which places were on their “bucket list”.

The airline had offered prizes, including free round-trip flights to Malaysia from Australia and New Zealand, in a contest called “My Ultimate Bucket List”, despite 537 people being killed in two air accidents involving the airline this year.

A bucket list refers to things someone wants to do before dying, or “kicking the bucket”.

The fact anyone still books tickets with Malaysian is a miracle, so perhaps that will offset the bad luck, right?   Read more »

Bringing classy back

Herald on Sunday

Kerre Woodham looks to be a convert to Malaysian Airlines with their new restriction on kids on the upper levels of their A380s, she suggests they extend the ban from children:

But a quick poll among my talkback listeners revealed that there was way worse to endure than crying kids.

Obese people who demand that the armrest be raised so they can wedge themselves in are a pet hate; as are stinky people who seem to have an aversion to deodorant or indeed any form of personal hygiene.

One person told me he saw an Auckland Airport official take a smelly passenger away for a shower before they could board their flight, and if that’s true give that man or woman a medal.

Being stuck by the toilets and seated next to people trying to join the mile-high club were all considered worse than a crying baby.

Still, the stance by Malaysian Airlines is a start. Today restrictions on screaming babies, tomorrow the obese, next week the smelly. Let’s bring classy back to international travel.