Maori Land Court

The surprise is what exactly? That someone failed to steal the tea money as well?

The NZ Herald has a story about yet another Maori organisation has burned all their cash.

The surprise is what exactly? That someone failed to steal the tea money as well?

A Far North Maori trust that received more than $1 million two years ago now has less than $15 in the bank.

And a judge says there could be a case of “equitable if not actual fraud” against former trustees.

Court documents show Judge David Ambler removed four trustees from the Parengarenga 3G Trust in August after allegations they paid themselves $600,000 over a year, months after the trust was set up.

A further $400,000 of the trust’s money is unaccounted for.

A reserved judgment by Judge Ambler says the Maori Land Court appointed seven people in 2009 to replace the Maori Trustee organisation as responsible trustees for a 500ha plantation forestry block in Parengarenga.

The Maori Trustee works in partnership with owners of Maori land to protect and build their assets and can be appointed to work on behalf of owners.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

What a lovely family, so much class

The Harawira family are so lovely, what ever happened that visited them upon us all.

How can one family so lack in dignity and class. Feral is really the only suitable word to describe them.

Former anti-violence campaigner Hinewhare Harawira may be removed as a trustee at Waitangi after performing a traditional Maori insult where she mooned an elderly crowd on a marae.

Harawira, who stepped down in her role as an anti-violence campaigner after her three sons were charged and later jailed for a “horrendous” assault on a child, performed the whakapohane after “suffering abuse” during a tenant’s eviction.

She was appointed as a trustee to the Te Tii (Waitangi) B3 Trust on August 25, 2012, however, three other trustees took their attempts to have her removed to the Maori Land Court of New Zealand after the incident.

Trustees Hapeta Rameka, Billie Taituha and Joyce Baker objected to her appointment because of her “despicable behaviour”.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Labour vs Key vs Waitangi

Stuff.co.nz

Opposition parties are calling on the Maori Party to walk the away from its support agreement with National over the Prime Minister’s “insulting” comments about the Waitangi Tribunal.

This is very interesting because Labour faced a similar situation in 2000 when Maori claimed New Zealand’s oil and gas production before the Waitangi Tribunal:

Jonathan Milne wrote in the Dom Post on 16 October 2000:

MAORI claiming ownership of New Zealand’s gas and petroleum resources are wasting their time with a Waitangi Tribunal hearing this week, according to the Government, because the tribunal’s recommendation will not affect its policy.

Associate Energy Minister Paul Swain said last night that he had assured oil drilling companies of continuing crown ownership of oil and petrol — and no Waitangi Tribunal hearing or subsequent court action by Maori would change that.

The tribunal had earlier asked the Government to hold fire on Taranaki claim settlements and oil-related decisions till Hawera-based Nga Ruahine’s claim over gas and petroleum royalties was heard, to avoid prejudicing the hearing.

The oil industry has been paying levies and royalties to the Government — worth up to $140 million this year — since gas and petroleum resources were nationalised in 1937.

Mr Swain said the claimants were entitled to express their view to the tribunal, but they already knew the Government’s position on ownership of oil.

“If the tribunal decision is in their favour, and it may or may not be, then I would imagine they’ll be looking to try and have that claim reinforced through the courts procedure,” he said.

“They have a right to do that, but they know the Government’s position.”

Labour’s position was quite clear then, Paul Swain was even more robust than John Key has been. He basically said that it didn’t really matter what the Waitangi Tribunal said, Labour’s policy was going ahead anyway and he even went as far as to assure oil drilling companies.

Swain’s comments of course sparked “outrage”…Jonathan Milne again wrote int he Dom Post the next day:

THE Government was jeopardising its case for keeping ownership of oil and gas resources by disregarding the Waitangi Tribunal, Maori Land Court Chief Judge Joe Williams warned yesterday.

His warning came as a senior government official conceded that Associate Energy Minister Paul Swain had a conflict of interest, in dealing with Maori concerns about drilling while accepting royalties from mining companies.

Mr Swain sparked outrage yesterday, at the start of the tribunal’s hearing into Nga Ruahine’s claim over petroleum resources, by saying that neither the tribunal nor the courts would change the Government’s petroleum policy.

Nga Ruahine kaumatua Tom Ngatai told the tribunal that Maori had been treated like a dog. “But you kick your dog so many times, and you’ll end up bitten and bitten. Possibly he’ll kill you . . . It’s all very well to say in the paper that everything’s futile, but we’re not here to say `good morning’ and go back home.”

Chief Judge Williams, presiding, asked crown lawyer Virginia Hardy to convey his concerns to Mr Swain: “You have no doubt advised your client that he is unlikely to assist his case, either here or in the ordinary courts, by indicating a closed mind.”

Mr Swain, delegated with responsibility for crown minerals, has assured international investors in petroleum exploration that their position will not be threatened.

Helen Clark even weighed in with her own view:

Prime Minister Helen Clark said the Government’s settlements were based on policy, not Waitangi Tribunal recommendations. “You can assume that the Government will proceed to settle in line with the previous statements it has made about its principles for settling.”

So, as David Farrar notes, will the opposition parties that are calling on the Maori Party to walk away from the Government on this issue, now make the Waitangi Tribunal recommendations binding on Government and Parliament. Helen Clark and Paul Swain never did…so why would David Shearer now…or is all this pure politicking without any foundation or basis in honesty from Labour and David Shearer?

We have all been here before and the result will likely end up the same…except it is far clearer on water…no one owns it. We have heard the threats and carping and whining from Maori before.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.