Maori Television

Imagine what we could do with half a million?

David Farrar posted about cost per viewer of some current affairs shows, a post that showed that Russell Brown’s latest incarnation of his mostly boring show gets funding of over $500,000 per annum.

The viewer numbers are pretty appalling, even when you consider some revised figures.

Average viewers per episode (based on Nielsen data):

  • Q+A 99,000 – No It’s 70,600 average viewers for the first play and a further 20,500 for the second play so 91,100 over the two plays.
  • The Nation 49,000 – No it’s 22,900 average viewers for the first play on the Saturday and a further 34,400 for the second play on Sunday so 57,300 total over the two plays.
  • Backbenches 25,400 – No it’s 17,500 average viewers per episode for the first play and a further 2,200 for the second play so 19,700 total over the two plays.
  • Media Take 1,900 – No it’s 5,000 average viewers per episode (20 episodes) for the first run and a further 2,400 (13 episodes). As the last season wasn’t repeated in full you can’t really add these two figures together.

My figures are from Neilsen data for late November/early December. I presume Mr Wallington has data for the entire year. It would be great if this was publicly available. I tried to get annual data off NZ on Air but they refused. I am of the view that they should publish average ratings for ever show they fund.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

This doesn’t seem legal to me

 

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via The Daily Blog

See how your sniff test works on this:

Two receptionists have lost their jobs at Maori Television because they cannot speak Te Reo Maori.

Maori Television chief executive Paora Maxwell said the new requirement for receptionists to be bi-lingual was part of a structural change in the organisation. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

So how much aid was the Maori TV crew delivering to Gaza?

Look at us, we tricked the world and got a free cruise on the Med as well!

Look at us, we tricked the world and got a free cruise on the Med as well!

We were all told by Maori Television that their journalist was part of the Kia Ora Gaza flotilla and they were delivering “aid” to Gaza.

We were also told by the media, acting as useful mouthpieces for Kia Ora Gaza that the aid that was being delivered were “medical equipment and solar panels“.

Marianne’s cargo includes donated medical equipment and solar panels: “The sun cannot be blockaded.”

Sounds admirable doesn’t it?

Well…uhmm..no…it was a lie.

The Washington Post explains:

Pro-Palestinian activists aboard a Swedish vessel tried and failed to punch through Israel’s maritime blockade of Gaza this week. Israeli commandos boarded the vessel, searched the ship and brought it to an Israeli port.

The Israeli military called the operation “uneventful.” According to a report, Israel’s Channel 2, one of the activists was zapped with a taser. The foreign activists were detained and are being deported.

In the scope of Middle East confrontations, it was a minor, though publicized, affair.

Afterwards, Israel’s defense minister Moshe Yaalon said, “there was no aid on board” the activist ship.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Maori Television reporter deported from Israel

One of the two reporters from Maori Television on board the terror-supporting protest flotilla has been deported from Israel.

Maori Television reporter Ruwani Perera has been deported from Israel after she and cameraman Jacob Bryant were filming a story onboard a flotilla of ships detained by the Israeli military.

Perera contacted relatives on Tuesday morning (New Zealand time) via satellite phone to say she was being deported, her partner Tim Werry said.

Werry said she was safe and that she would be flying back into Auckland on July 1.

It was only a brief message, he said, and he did not hear what had happened to Perera’s colleague Bryant.

“It’s all happening so quickly,” he said.

Werry said he was initially relieved to hear the news that she had been released by the Israeli military.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Has Maori Television disavowed its reporters?

There are two Maori television reporters aboard the boats planning on risking life and limb to run the blockade of Gaza.

Ruwani Perera (Ngati Sri Lanka) and her cameraman are in grave danger and it appears that the Maori Television management and board have not completed the appropriate risk assessments to protect them and the organisation from legal action if either of them are injured or killed.

The media are all over this because, as is usual, they are taking sides. But what they are not telling you is the following:

  1. The blockade of Gaza is legal.

    The blockade of Gaza by Israel and Egypt was put in place in 2007 after Hamas came to power and started to attack Israel. 

    The UN-commissioned ‘[Sir Geoffrey] Palmer Report‘ regarding the Gaza Flotilla Incident of 2010 deemed the naval blockade by Israel to be a legitimate security measure to prevent weapons from entering Gaza by sea and to protect the Israeli population: “Israel has faced and continues to face a real threat to its security from militant groups in Gaza. Rockets, missiles and mortar bombs have been launched from Gaza towards Israel since 2001. More than 5,000 were fired between 2005 and January 2009, when the naval blockade was imposed. Hundreds of thousands of Israeli civilians live in the range of these attacks … The purpose of these acts of violence, which have been repeatedly condemned by the international community, has been to do damage to the population of Israel. It seems obvious enough that stopping these violent acts was a necessary step for Israel to take in order to protect its people and to defend itself.”

  2. Breaching the blockade is illegal.

    Violation of a lawful blockade constitutes unlawful activity, as reflected in paragraphs 10, 67, and 146 of the San Remo Manual on International Law Applicable to Armed Conflicts at Sea, 12 June 1994.

  1. The UN recommends governments should dissuade activists from these activities.

    The Palmer Report clearly states: “Attempts to breach a lawfully imposed naval blockade place the vessel and those on board at risk. Where a State becomes aware that its citizens or flag vessels intend to breach a naval blockade, it has a responsibility to take pro-active steps compatible with democratic rights and freedoms to warn them of the risks involved and to endeavour to dissuade them from doing so.”

  1. Aid is being delivered to Gaza on a daily basis via Israel.

    According to the Israeli Coordination of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT), there were 1,252 crossings from Israel into Gaza, including 14,533 tonnes of goods, on Wednesday, June 24th, 2015 alone, consistent with previous days.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

These stupid people are going to get hurt…or worse

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Super Dvora class fast patrol boat leaving dock in Haifa. Photo/ Cam Slater, Whaleoil Media

Two Maori Television staff are going to try and break Israel’s blockade.

They’re foolish and in grave danger.

Two Māori TV staff are aboard the “Freedom Flotilla III” currently steaming to break an Israel-controlled naval blockade.

The flotilla set sail from Messina, Italy this week on a humanitarian mission to take an undisclosed tranche of supplies through the Israel Defence Force (IDF) blockade to the Palestinian territory in Gaza.

Journalist Ruwani Perera and camera operator Jacob Bryant, facilitated by Kia Ora Gaza Trust, are on the Swedish former trawler Marianne av Göteborg, which will meet up with other boats shortly.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Coffey gets it in the arse

The tipline ran hot yesterday with some interesting news that is causing a fair bit of angst in Labour circles.

The word has been quietly put about that Labour’s new (Maori) comms person has been appointed.

Putting Māori Members of Parliament (MPs) at the forefront of important New Zealand politics is Jodi Ihaka’s plan, as she was recently appointed the Labour Party’s new Senior Communications Advisor (Māori).

“I’m really excited to use my communication skills in such an important Māori advisory capacity.  I have loved my time at Whakaata Māori (Māori Television) and have nothing but respect for the Māori journalists on Te Kāea and Native Affairs,” says Ihaka.

The position sees Ihaka take on a key advisory role to Labour leader, Andrew Little as well as Māori MPs including Kelvin Davis, Peeni Henare, Louisa Wall, Meka Whaitiri, Nanaia Mahuta and Adrian Rurawhe.

However not without some squealing and some anger.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Comment of the Day

There is a lot of fuss about the demise of Campbell Live, mostly from the wailing left wing.

They claim that it is the death of current affairs.

Unfortunately they are wrong, there are plenty more current affairs shows as one commenter, GregM, this morning pointed out.

Yep says it all. The other thing that cracks me up is the lefty whingers going on that this is the end of current affairs programs on free to air TV. Hardly. We still have:
Q+A
The Nation
Native Affairs
Sunday
360
3rd Degree (changed name to 3D)
60 Minutes
20/20
Attitude   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Bleating Maori trougher having a sook

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Shane Bradbrook is a trougher who I busted for his rubbish anti-smoking campaigns which were really an excuse to cart his troughing self around the world telling people how great he is at stopping indigenous people smoking…the only problem was he wasn’t oing anything of the sort….the reports I obtained under the OIA showed how ineffective he was and he got his funding cut.

Now he is bleating to his pals at Maori TV about how hard done he was.

Shane Bradbrook knows what it’s like to be attacked by Cameron Slater. Bradbrook and his Māori anti-tobacco group were heavily criticised on the blogsite, WhaleOil.

“We lost contracts on it, we were questioned on our viability, credibility, despite us having a great record and meeting outcomes we were attacked constantly,” says Bradbroock.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Face of the day

QUESTION: When is a victim of negative publicity in the Media not a victim?

ANSWER: When he is Cameron Slater

QUESTION: When is a victim of negative publicity in the Media a victim?

ANSWER: When the negative publicity is from Whaleoil.co.nz

 

Today’s Face of the day is a victim according to Maori Television, a victim of posts on a Blog. Of course the accuracy and facts in the posts are not in dispute just their influence.

Shane Bradbrook

Shane Bradbrook

 

Shane Bradbrook was also a former victim of the blogger, Cameron Slater, also known as WhaleOil, over his work for anti-tobacco group Te Reo Mārama.

Shane Bradbrook knows what it’s like to be attacked by Cameron Slater. Bradbrook and his Māori anti-tobacco group were heavily criticised on the blogsite, WhaleOil.

“We lost contracts on it, we were questioned on our viability, credibility, despite us having a great record and meeting outcomes we were attacked constantly,” says Bradbroock.

Shane Bradbrook’s group had been operating for over 10 years, brought to its knees and subsequent closure by the attacks on the WhaleOil blogsite.

-Maori Television

Now that you have read Shane’s view perhaps you would like to see what was actually said on Whaleoil?

You can see everything here.

If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai