Marriage

Photo of the Day

The Windsors meeting Hitler. Edward adored her. He had met her in 1931 when he was Prince of Wales, and she was married to her second husband, Ernest Simpson. It was not long before they were in love. “My own beloved Wallis”, he wrote in 1935, “I love you more & more & more & more… I haven’t seen you once today & I can’t take it. I love you”.

The Woman Who Could Not Be Queen

American socialite Wallis Simpson became the mistress of Edward, Prince of Wales. Edward abdicated the throne to marry her, a period known as the Abdication Crisis.

Of all the scandalous women in history, Wallis Simpson is probably one of the most vilified, the most fascinating, and the most misunderstood. The Duchess of Windsor has been accused of being a lesbian, a nymphomaniac, a Nazi spy, and a man.

Since she first made a splash on the international stage in the 1930s, interest in her has only grown, thanks in no small part to the success of films and television shows in recent years.

People have imagined Simpson as everything from a victim to a romantic heroine and fashion icon, and she has even been accused of being a seductress and a Nazi spy.

This American socialite became notorious for her affair with Prince Edward. Edward was not just any old prince: he was the eldest son and heir of his father, King George V, and was thus next in line to the throne of the United Kingdom. His obsession with Simpson did not lessen when he become King Edward VIII in 1936 – he was so besotted with her that he actually went through the trouble of abdicating the throne so that he could marry her.

Known as the Duke and Duchess of Windsor after Edward’s abdication, the couple captured the public’s imagination. The public saw their love affair as a storybook fantasy, and the couple became the poster children of romance winning out over duty and defying the contempt of the government.

There is no consensus about Wallis Simpson’s motivations or even some details about her private life. But there are enough tantalising, fascinating facts about this woman to keep historians intrigued.

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Ain’t love grand…and then there is this

She looks so happy to be marrying this Black Power gang member.

The media are lapping it up though, celebrating gang lifestyle. I wonder if Kelvin Davis was invited?

A video of a Black Power gang couple sharing their nuptials has been shared on Facebook and viewed thousands of times across the country.

The North Island couple are pictured sitting on chairs with crate bottles in hand at a residential property while other family and gang members sit round with drinks and the celebrant reads their vows.   Read more »

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Photo of the Day

Handouts/03.28.07/RJTECH/email from Charlie Moore/APD’s new recruiting/This picture was placed on 10 billboards across the city. It was part of APD’s new recruiting campaign that used the runaway bride as a way to get recruits. Photo: COURTESY APD Albuquerque Police spokeswoman Trish Hoffman appears in a new recruiting ad for the department.

The Bride Who Faked Her Own Kidnapping

Jennifer Wilbanks became something of a folk anti-hero, inspiring an action figure and a grocery store condiment called “Jennifer’s High Tailin’ Hot Sauce,” and numerous other items, even toast…

John Mason and Jennifer Wilbanks had planned a late April wedding with 14 bridesmaids and 14 groomsmen, but the wedding would get postponed when the bride got cold feet. For nearly a week media attention would focus on Duluth, Georgia, a growing city in the suburbs of Atlanta that the two called home.

32-year-old Jennifer Wilbanks disappeared while out jogging four days before her wedding, it sparked one of the biggest missing persons stories in America in 2005. Then the shocking truth emerged.

At roughly 8.30pm on a chilly April night in the small town of Duluth, Georgia, Jennifer Wilbanks told her fiancé, John Mason that she was popping out for a run. Mason, 32, thought nothing of it. She ran marathons – it was one of the many things they had in common. And with their wedding only 4 days away, Jennifer had a lot on her mind – a run would do her good.

But Jennifer, then 31, didn’t return that night. At 10.15pm, Mason went looking for her around Duluth in his car. “I thought maybe she might have turned her ankle and fallen,” he said. “Or someone could have beaten her up… No idea.” He called the police at around midnight and spent a sleepless night by the phone. He had little idea then, that it would be the first of many.

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Photo Of The Day

“David S.(Bear) Crenshaw and Kimberley (Tigger) Crenshaw … Together forever. Married three years.”

“David S. (Bear) Crenshaw and Kimberley (Tigger) Crenshaw.… Together forever. Married three years.”

Love and Death on the Third Floor

On The Cystic Fibrosis Wing Of Dallas’ Presbyterian Hospital, an Unlikely Romance Bloomed Between Two Sick Patients. The Outcome Was Inevitable

She was the princess who wore Tiffany perfume. He was the middle-class guy who raced cars. But when they met on the cystic fibrosis wing of a Dallas hospital, romance bloomed.

They first laid eyes on one another in the spring of 1986, when they were both admitted to the cystic fibrosis wing of Dallas’ Presbyterian Hospital. Kimberley Marshall was then sixteen, thin and winter-pale and beautiful, her red hair falling down the back of her pink nightgown patterned with little white hearts. David Crenshaw was eighteen; he wore his usual hand-me-down T-shirt and faded gray pajama pants and oversized glasses that turned dark in the sunlight. David would stand at one end of the hospital hallway, hoping Kim would come out of her room at the other end.

“No way,” the wing’s respiratory therapist, Doug Kellum, would say. “No way she’s going to look twice at you.”

Kim was known among the nurses as the princess. She came from a polished North Dallas family. She loved Tiffany perfume, Lancôme makeup, and clothes from Neiman Marcus. She would sit for hours in her hospital bed, reading romance novels. David, on the other hand, was famous for his bad grammar and coarse jokes. When a female nurse walked past his room, he would lean forward in his bed and shout, “Shake it, baby, don’t break it.” On Saturday nights when he wasn’t in the hospital, he raced midget cars at a local dirt track. “Can you name just one other race car driver in this country with cystic fibrosis?” he proudly asked Kellum. “Let me tell you, there ain’t one.”

“She still isn’t going to talk to you,” Kellum replied.

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Photo Of The Day

FDR's mother Sara with her son and daughter-in-law Eleanor. Franklin Roosevelt was born in 1882. His father had been married previously and was already 54 years old with a 28 year-old son by then.

FDR’s mother Sara with her son and daughter-in-law Eleanor. Franklin Roosevelt was born in 1882. His father had been married previously and was already 54 years old with a 28 year-old son by then.

The Many Loves of FDR

The Influence Of The Women Who Figured So Prominently in His Life

“They form and reveal him” 

In the early 1900’s, very few women were working outside the home. The Victorian ideal of the angel in the house, a school of thought that promoted female domesticity, had crept into the new century. Women were just earning their right to vote, rarely received higher education, and if they wanted to work, were stuck with the limited options of teacher or secretary. Among these few working women was Lucy Mercer, mistress of Franklin D. Roosevelt and secretary to his wife, Eleanor.

FDR was a man who knew adversity – he learned to live with polio at the age of 39, became president at the height of the Great Depression, was involved in two World Wars, and rescued the economy with his “New Deal.” Despite these major achievements, an affair would make it impossible to save his own marriage.

When FDR proposed to his distant cousin Eleanor in 1905, his mother, Sara Roosevelt, opposed the union vehemently. Though the future President was 23 years old, she maintained that he was too young to get married, and made herself an awkward presence in his newlywed life. The townhouse she built for them adjoined to hers on every floor, but despite these intrusions on their privacy, the couple had six children, the first four in rapid succession.

While FDR liked to socialize and was comfortable among the upper class, Eleanor preferred a simpler existence. Nevertheless, when her husband was made Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1913, she had many public obligations to fulfill, and hired Lucy Mercer to be her social security. Mercer was fun, vivacious, and beautiful, and it wasn’t long before she was sleeping with her boss’s husband.

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Photo Of The Day

Angus and Evelyn Jane.

Angus and Evelyn Jane.

My Mother’s Lover

What Happens when Your Mother’s Dying Wish is to Rest in Peace with…Someone You’ve Never Heard of Before?

For years my mother wore a gold locket. When I was a boy, I liked to pull it up from inside her blouse on its chain, tugging it up from between her breasts so I could squeeze the curved button that ran along one edge and make the curlicue gold cover, heavily sprung, pop open to reveal a photograph of my mother’s grandparents.

On an elegant chair sat her grandmother and namesake, Ivy Evelyn Stone, a formidable-looking woman wearing a full skirt, a fuller blouse, and an immensely confident expression. Next to her chair stood her husband, Gene, a railroad engineer in their hometown of Wichita Falls. Especially in Wichita Falls, a railroad town, this was a high-status position then, like that of an airline pilot 50 years later. He is dressed in suit and tie, hair slicked, with his hand on the back of the chair.

I viewed this portrait as a fair representation of the distant world from which my mother came: a stable, solid existence full of aunts and uncles and her mother and father and grandparents all living toughly but carefully in the high bright sun struck towns of north Texas. The picture agreed with the steady, accomplished, morally sturdy person I and many others knew my mother to be. But it hid the fact that she came from a world that moved violently beneath her feet.

The February after my mother died, my brother, Allen, left his New Mexico home and boarded a plane for Honolulu. He carried a backpack that carried a rosewood box that carried our mother’s ashes. The next day, on Maui, he bought six leis and rented a sea kayak. With the leis in a shopping bag and our mother’s ashes in his pack, he paddled into the Pacific.

That day nine years ago was the sort one hopes for in the tropics: warm and balmy, with a breeze that pushed cat’s paws over the water. Beyond the mouth of the bay he could see rising plumes, the spouts of humpback whales gathered to breed. He paddled toward them. When he was closer to the whales than to the shore, he shipped his oar and opened his pack. He pulled out the box and sat with it on his lap, letting the boat drift. He watched the distant spouts. Without any prelude, a whale suddenly but gently surfaced about 30 yards in the distance and released a gush of air. It bobbed, noisily breathed, and dove.

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Let’s talk about marriage

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Nicholas and Rafaela Ordaz, from California, had a double party last weekend to mark their 82nd wedding anniversary and Nicholas turning 102.

When we read about couples who have been married for a long time they are rarely investigative, in-depth articles. I wish these would be written as we would all benefit from learning the secrets of a long and successful marriage. Unfortunately stories like these tend to be summed  up with a flippant few words. In the case of the above couple, the  secret of their success was distilled down to…

respect, affection and not sweating the small stuff.

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In today’s throwaway society we need more of a guideline than that. Marriages have gone the way of food. No longer do we expect full course meals; we are happy to settle for takeaways.  When Cam and I got married he mentioned in his speech the statistics for marriage. The odds were not in our favour.  He stated his intention to beat those odds.

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We had both attended friends’ marriages before our own. What surprised both of us was the content of their vows. One line that stuck with me was the vow to ‘walk beside you in life’.  What did that mean? What kind of promise was that? I was only 23 but I knew that it would take a lot more than walking beside someone in life for a marriage to make it. In our vows we promised to turn every difficulty into a stepping stone to a deeper love. They were brave words but ones we never lost sight of, though we did forget them for many years and focused on just surviving instead.

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Face of the day

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Today’s face of the day is a sex doll who was married to a terminally ill 28 year old Chinese man.

A Chinese man with terminal cancer has married a sex doll because he didn’t want to leave behind a bereaved widow.

The man is said to have wanted to experience the full splendour of a wedding before he died, after being diagnosed with cancer, but didn’t want to leave a human being struggling to cope with his loss.

The ‘newly-weds’ appeared in a series of surprisingly tender wedding photographs: hugging in front of a sunlit window, reflected romantically in a shadowy mirror and staring lovingly into each other’s eyes.

-dailymail

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A tragedy? Sure. But I can’t help feel he dodged a bullet at the last minute

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Still has some bugs to work out then

Normally losing your brand spanking new wife to suicide would be a tragedy, but I think this guy won the lottery

A newlywed wife whose husband complained she spent too much time on social media hanged herself after he confiscated her phone.

The woman, identified only as a 20-year-old named Aparna from the Kerala region, became upset following a row with her husband about her constant use of Facebook and WhatsApp. Read more »

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Faces of the day

Del and Mary PHOTO -realsimple.com

Mary L. Tabor and Del Persinger. Married 26 years PHOTO -realsimple.com

 

Today’s faces of the day are a real couple who faced serious struggles in their marriage and emerged stronger and happier in the end. Some times you have to lose something in order to value it again. It is inspiring to read about ordinary couples who almost lost each other but found a way to re connect and get back to each other.


Mary was still in her nightgown and robe, sipping a cappuccino in the kitchen of the Washington, D.C., brownstone she shared with her husband, Del, when he walked in and announced he wanted to live alone. They had been married for 21 years.

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