Matthew Holehouse

Greens are crazy the world over…and evil

We all know how crazy our Greens are. We also know that Green policies actually kill people, like the victims of Australian bushfires killed by Green policies preventing back-burning in cooler months.

The election int he Uk is proving interesting, mainly for two reason…the crazies of the UKIP and the really cray types in the Green party.

James Delingpole explains:

Many years ago, when I was a young diarist working for the Daily Telegraph?s Peterborough column, my bosses dispatched me to cover the Green Party conference. This wasn?t because I was particularly anti-Green at the time. Rather it was because, of all Peterborough?s staffers, I was known to be the one least interested in politics and the political process, so it seemed entirely appropriate to send me to the big joke event in the conference season, rather than to one of the more serious events.

The only thing I remember about the event was being inveigled into some fringe activity in which I was forced to participate with various Green delegates in some kind of non-competitive group bonding exercise where we all had to roll about on the floor. Someone let out the most repellent fart. It smelt evil but everyone present politely conspired to pretend that everything was normal. I sense something similar going on right now in the collective efforts of the media chattering classes to present the Green Party as a viable, vibrant and credible force in UK politics in the approach to the General Election.

Classic Delingpole sledging.

He continues to explain why he thinks they are evil and wrong.

Apparently the Green Party?s membership has now overtaken UKIP?s. I?m quite prepared to believe this but I think it says more about the fiendish zealotry of the sort of people attracted to environmental causes than it does about the Green Party itself. It?s not as though the Green Party has suddenly gone and recruited a brilliant, inspirational go-ahead new leader ? au contraire: see Nathalie Bennett, below ? nor as though it has undergone some manner of dramatic, Clause 4 style, policy reinvention.

Nope. It?s just that of all the parties, the Greens are the one whose target market accords most closely with the kind of people who flock to sign Change.Org petitions and join Twitter mobbings and go out on street demos (or better still, attend week-long protest camps where they can smoke dope, get to use the yurt and possibly get to rub shoulders with Vivienne Westwood). These people are signers, joiners, astroturfers. As a percentage of the population they are quite small but in terms of exerting political pressure they punch far above their weight by being highly committed and ? for a bunch of dope-smoking crusties ? surprisingly well organised. This Green Party membership surge is just another part of that strategy. I don?t believe that it will translate into anything significant at the polls.

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The act of an ambitious weirdo

The Young Nats had a reasonable weekend pushing through a remit int he face of some backroom bullying to have it spiked. These young activists have more fight and heart than many of the old school. The older Young Nats are reasonably sensible but there area ?few loons.

Young Labour too has more than a few useful activists, though some slightly older ex-activists shake their heads in amazement at their antics, which may be contributing to them not participating.

This is not unusual. The same happens the world over.?

To those of my generation, it’s assumed that anyone who joins a political party is a brown-nosing careerist. They spout pompously like spokesmen, attach their party to their Twitter handles ? ToryMinx or LabourLad ? and backstab to gain the 15 votes they need to become president of their university club. You wouldn’t want to be stuck in a lift with these people. They’re more interested in manifestos than personal hygiene.? Read more »