Mediaworks

The Herald scores a major scoop ahead of competitors

The NZ Herald published a story (really, more like republishing someone else’s list) about unparliamentary name calling on 23 February.

Fast times in Parliament usually end in heated debates, but not everything goes in terms of what can be said.

Insults, “unbecoming” language and accusations of dishonesty are banned, according to a list on the New Zealand Parliament website, but we’re seriously considering getting some of these phrases back into circulation in the newsroom.

Some of our favourites include the 1936 term “Fungus Farmer” which may have been rude in 1936 but is a perfectly legitimate occupation today.

Another favourite is the 1949 banned phrase “His brains could revolve inside a peanut shell for a thousand years without touching the sides.”

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+ HR = 3 doesn’t even impress professional designers

Near universal rejection of TV3’s new logo by the public is one thing, but if you can’t even get professionals on board with it, you have to wonder where it went wrong.

A leading New Zealand brand designer has panned television channel Three’s rebrand as looking “like a logo for a party pill”.

Jonathan Sagar is executive creative director of brand development agency Voice, and in his 40 years in the design industry has worked with major clients including Vodafone, KPMG, Farmers and O-I Glass.

He thought the new Three logo was not a bad piece of design – but it wasn’t the right look for the TV station’s brand, and ran the risk of alienating some segments of the channel’s viewership.

It would be consistent with alienating the audience in most other ways as well.    Read more »

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Mediaworks and Campbell Live finally forced to apologise after 5 years

In a damning Broadcasting Standards Authority decision Mediaworks has been forced to apologise for the conduct of Campbell Live in running a biased story.

TV3 has apologised on air for a story on the now-cancelled Campbell Live show, which showed footage of a woman they secretly filmed.

Margaret Harkema, a former director of the Valley Animal Research Centre, which carried out experiments on beagles, featured in five episodes of the TV3 current affairs programme in late 2011.

Five episodes? Sounds like a campaign of vilification.

Before last night’s Story – the current affairs show that replaced Campbell Live – aired, a message was displayed onscreen with a voiceover.

The message said that the Broadcasting Standards Authority found the programmes were inaccurate, unfair, based on “a pre-determined, narrow view of Ms Harkema and her practices”, were wrongfully edited to portray Harkema as dishonest and left out important information that was inconsistent with Campbell Live’s allegations.   Read more »

Mediaworks plugs a loophole

Heather du Plessis-Allan has got the arse card from Mediaworks after running off her mouth to competitor NZME.

This was one loophole that wasn’t going to save her.

Story host Heather du Plessis-Allan has been ordered off air by MediaWorks after a controversial interview.

It is understood an email was sent to MediaWorks staff by news chief Hal Crawford stating that there were “inaccuracies” in du Plessis-Allan’s interview.

Did she lie?

In the interview with NZME on Sunday, Heather said she hadn’t told her co-host Garner that she was quitting TV, and claimed the pair knew in July Story would be axed.

Crawford told staff in the email that du Plessis-Allan did not know the show was ending, and the decision to discontinue Story was only taken recently.

“I can confirm Heather is leaving MediaWorks. I am not requiring that she work out her notice period and therefore she will not appear on air for the remainder of Story or her Radio Live show,” he wrote.  Read more »

John Key’s in-womb termination of TVNZ/ MediaWorks merger

John Key has scotched any possibility of a TVNZ/MediaWorks merger.

Prime Minister John Key has ruled out the possibility of a merger between the two major players in the New Zealand media landscape — TVNZ and MediaWorks.

It comes after reports in Australia that the privately owned broadcaster — which owns TV3, half of New Zealand’s commercial radio market, and Newshub — and the state-owned broadcaster are in merger discussions.

Mr Key says the Government is not keen on the idea, and is not something that’s actively being progressed.

“I think it’s very unlikely to happen and I don’t think there’s a great amount of support from the Government side, which is a critical part. The Government would have to allow it to happen on the TVNZ side.

“We like the idea that there are competing networks. I’ve heard, not formally but on the grapevine, that there’s a bit of interest and that just simply reflects the fact that there’s a very changing media landscape now in the world,” says Mr Key.

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It seems Newshub has a moderation problem too

This screenshot is from Newshub’s Facebook page and shows that they allow calls to assassinate John Key to live for quite a while on the page.

newshub death threat Read more »

Hilary is replaced by a weather girl that we’ll call Hilary too

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Hilary Barry’s replacement was called Hilary by the highest paid professional at Mediaworks.   An accident?   Is the female talent really that interchangeable?

Being called Hilary within the first 30 seconds was probably not the welcome Ingrid Hipkiss was hoping for at her new job on Paul Henry.

The Newshub weather presenter, who was initially thought to be stepping in for three weeks, has been announced as Hilary Barry’s permanent replacement.

But at the beginning of Monday’s episode, while viewers could see Barry’s seat was occupied by Hipkiss, there was confusion for radio listeners when Henry said congratulations and good morning to “Hilary”.

Newshub weather presenter Ingrid Hipkiss was introduced as Hilary on her very first day on Paul Henry.

It might sound akin to Henry’s sense of humour, but the host was quick to apologise and blamed his age for the slip.

If he’s that demented already, he shouldn’t be in the job.  Read more »

I would have eased them out the door with my boot

The precious luvvies who have been given the arse-card from Mediaworks are having a sook at the corporate shill site of Duncan Grieve, The Spin Off.

Their parent publication, The NZ Herald gleefully helps put the boot in by quoting bitter old hag Pip Keane right at the start of their article.

The former executive producer on axed TV3 show Campbell Live has revealed the “shitty” parting gift given to host John Campbell on his last day.

According to Pip Keane, all she and Campbell received on their final day at the network was “identical, shitty bunches of flowers”.

That’s not all: in a report on The Spinoff about terrible leaving gifts, Keane says the flowers were bought for a group of five staff who were leaving that day – but only four bunches were ordered.

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Nobody is forced to live in a car; they have clearly chosen to do it

The Media party, and Newshub in particular, are still pimping the housing crisis.

On Saturday morning The Nation (yes them) pimped a couple living in their car.

They are called the hidden homeless.

They’re a growing number of working families being forced to live in vehicles due to being unable to afford Auckland’s soaring rent prices.

According to figures collated by the Salvation Army, rent for three-bedroom homes increased in Auckland by 25 percent from 2010 to 2015.

For Marie and her two young children, her car has been her home for two months.

“It’s like they’re shut away from society, really like I’ve hidden them away for society. They have nothing we’re just here 24/7.”

Her partner’s not here — he’s busy at his fulltime job. However his take home pay of $600 a week can’t match south Auckland rentals demanding $500 and more.   Read more »

Ben Rachinger and the dirty Mediaworks tag team

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As news is generated about Ben Rachinger, media cover it.  In fact, last court appearance, there were camera crews from TVNZ, Sky News (I believe) and TV3.

That’s all normal and fine.

But what happens when a news organisation starts to champion one specific individual’s case against another?  What if they are actively interfering in the court case?   What if they fund a media lawyer when their protagonist is self represented? Read more »