Megan Woods

A very dense thicket of Woods

Rain forest along the Milford Track

Jonathan Young continued his questioning of the hapless Minister of Energy and Resources in the house on Thursday when he picked up on her comment about the 6 TW of energy that Woods was intending to store in summer and use in winter.  (See yesterday’s post.)

After the usual, “Does the Minister stand by all her statements” and getting the usual, “Yes” he asked. Quote.

Is the Minister aware that 6 terawatts of energy is enough to power 60 billion 100-watt bulbs at the same time—over five times as many lightbulbs as are in use on the whole planet—and does she still stand by her statement yesterday that New Zealand produces 6 terawatts of surplus energy every summer? End quote.

Which was really a bit of a stupid statistic to use, he could have got some better ones from Whaleoil. (Just saying)  No one wants to turn on several billion 100 watt light bulbs at once; doesn’t he realise 100-watt bulbs have been replaced with LEDs?

Woods gave another of her long-winded non-answers: Quote. Read more »

WH is a pale, stale, male who does not believe all the doom and gloom climate nonsense so enjoys generating CO2 that the plants need to grow by driving his MG.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

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There’s a cuckoo in the Woods [Updated]

Yellow-billed cuckoo

Jonathan Young was back on the hunt for answers from Megan Woods, the Minister of Energy and Resources, after her answers to his questions yesterday left him (and all thinking people) deeply unsatisfied. Quote.

So when the Minister said yesterday “this Government is intent on building a resilient energy system with more resilient forms of renewable energy.”, how many megawatts of new renewable generation will be needed to reliably replace coal, gas, and diesel generation? End quote.

Nice simple question that could have a one sentence answer. “xxx MW”. Did he get that answer?  No, of course not.   Woods rattled on about how much extra electricity generation would be needed by 2050 and told us it was, Quote.

… a very achievable target of around the equivalent of 4.5 wind farms per year…. End quote.

4.5 wind farms per year!  My recent post about covering Taranaki in wind farms was a little tongue-in-cheek. It appears I was not joking after all; Woods said the first one was being built in Taranaki.

As Woods had not answered the question there was a bit of back and forth with the Speaker and Brownlee getting involved and Woods was told to answer again. Read more »

WH is a pale, stale, male who does not believe all the doom and gloom climate nonsense so enjoys generating CO2 that the plants need to grow by driving his MG.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

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Woods cannot see the wood for the trees


Question 10 in the house on Tuesday was entertaining and enlightening.   Jonathan Young asked Megan Woods, the Minister of Energy and Resources about any reports she had seen on the state of the electricity market, and whether she believed Government policy had the ability to impact the market positively or negatively?

Woods reply was to the effect that it was all the fault of the previous government and vulnerable people were being left behind and the winter energy payment was wonderful etc etc and that, Quote.

… we are leading a transition towards affordable, renewable energy like hydrogen and away from expensive and vulnerable fossil fuels. End quote.

Then Young pressed for details about electricity futures prices for next month and Woods mentioned $600 due to problems in the gas infrastructure but that all will be well shortly.

My follow-up question would have been: If a short-term problem with the gas infrastructure has pushed electricity prices through the roof, what does your government think is going to happen when the gas tap is turned off due to your government’s policies? Read more »

WH is a pale, stale, male who does not believe all the doom and gloom climate nonsense so enjoys generating CO2 that the plants need to grow by driving his MG.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

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This is what the green future looks like

Anticipated investments in new power plants, storage and electricity networks by 2031 in billion euros

Sit up and take notice James Shaw, Megan Woods and friends. This is the likely result of Cindy’s Captain’s Call Policy (CCCP).

In Germany, they called it the “Switch to the Future”  Energiewende. (Energy transition). If ruthless German efficiency cannot make the technology work then what hope does New Zealand have?

Germany has led the world (where have we heard that phrase recently?) and bullied the EU into climate change targets. They have set milestones and targets just like “Zero Carbon 2050” and it seems that it has not been a ripping success.  They had their ‘once in a generation’ solution, just like we are having Ardern’s generation’s “nuclear-free moment”.

This from the GWFP who translated the report from German. Quote.

Germany’s Federal Audit Office has accused the federal government of having largely failed to manage the transformation of Germany’s energy systems.

The expenditure for the ecological restructuring of the energy supply is in a “blatant disproportion to the hitherto poor yield”, said President of the Court of Audit Kay Scheller in Berlin: “The Federal Government is at risk to fail with its once in a generation project of the Energiewende”.

Read more »

WH is a pale, stale, male who does not believe all the doom and gloom climate nonsense so enjoys generating CO2 that the plants need to grow by driving his MG.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

More pointless grandstanding from Labour that shows they aren’t a government in waiting

Labour really does pick battles that no one cares about.

Parliament is going to debate a Labour Party bill that calls for the immediate election of all the members of Environment Canterbury.

It was drafted by Labour’s Canterbury spokeswoman Megan Woods in response to the government’s sacking of all the regional council’s elected members in 2010.

The government replaced them with commissioners because there had been serious delays in water management decisions.

It subsequently decided on a partial return to democratic representation, and in the local body elections earlier this month seven members of the 13-member council were elected.

The government has appointed the other six.

Ms Woods says that’s not good enough.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Electoral Amendment Bill missing one important change

The Electoral Amendment Bill has … passed its first reading with unanimous support, says Justice Minister Amy Adams.

The Bill implements recommendations made by the Justice and Electoral Select Committee Inquiry into the 2014 General Election that require a law change, and can be implemented in time for the 2017 General Election.

“The proposed changes in the Bill focus on improving services to voters, candidates and parties by making the law and voting process more user-friendly and adapting to changing voter behaviours,” says Ms Adams.

Key features of the legislation include:

– allowing electoral officials in voting places on election day to be able check a voter’s enrolment status by looking up and marking them off electronically, rather than having to rely on paper-based rolls

– permitting the counting of advance votes earlier on Election Day to ensure preliminary results can be announced in a timely manner

– allowing the Electoral Commission to use new methods of providing information to electors via email, in addition to post

– banning campaigning and the display of campaign material inside and within 10 metres of Advance Voting Places.

The Bill will now go to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee for further review.

Ms Adams says that the vast majority of the changes in the Bill have already been carefully considered by the Committee and unanimously recommended.

Rather unremarkably, there is no unanimous support to have all electoral breaches prosecuted.  The Electoral Commission hands all complaints to police.  Police then put them in a drawer and when all the heat has gone out of the issue, announce that they will not prosecute. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

The Nation asks if Talleys is a good corporate citizen but uses a man who threatens violence and rape as their front man

Screen Shot 2016-09-03 at 9.29.55 PM

The Nation on TV3 did a hit job on Talleys yesterday and replayed it again this morning.

They presented a worker called Phillip Reweti Bear, He is also standing for the Wanganui Council.

We have covered this ratbag before and his behaviour. Where he threatened Paula Bennett with rape and violence.

So yesterday morning we had The Nation asking AFFCO and Talleys are good corporate citizens?

Well what about the guy they were promoting, is he a good citizen? He’s still at the threats of violence, here is a recent outburst:

unnamed-7 Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Labour’s leadership puts head in sand and starts cleansing dissent

Matthew Hooton, in his NBR column tells the tale of how Labour are moving to shut down what they see as dissent inside their party.

Progress wanted Labour to take a more holistic view of who people are, how they live and where they want to be.  As they see it, in a 24-hour day, people want the opportunity to spend eight hours being involved in creating something meaningful and valuable at work.  They want another eight hours to enjoy time with their families and communities.  And they need the remaining eight hours for sleep in a safe, warm, comfortable home.

Progress believes this more well-rounded vision is a far more accurate echo of the message of Labour’s original founders than the views of the “self-serving unionists and gaggle of gays” they believe have undue influence on the party today.

Alongside Labour’s approved factions – the Women’s Council, Te Kaunihera Maori, the unions, Rainbow, the Pasifika Sector and so on – the new Progress group thought they might have something to offer.  It turned out they were wrong.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

I wonder if Megan Woods and Louisa Wall will push harder for the expulsion of these rabble rousers

Yesterday Richard Harman broke the news that a new ginger group was being set up by Josie Pagani, Phil Quin and Nick Leggatt to attempt to solve the ills inside Labour.

He also reported that several MPs in Labour’s caucus were aghast at the idea and promptly called for the excommunication of those involved.

WOBH can reveal that two of the most vocal supporters of expulsion for the rabble rousers were Megan Woods and Louisa Wall.

Meanwhile Josie Pagani has spoken to Claire Trevett at the Herald.

One of the founders of a proposed Labour-aligned lobby group says it will make some in the party uncomfortable but Labour cannot avoid the tough issues it is facing.

Josie Pagani, a former Labour Party candidate, confirmed she was involved in setting up a “think-tank” called Progress targeting Labour’s right and centre.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Why is Scott Simpson not calling bull**** on sea level rise claims?

Look, I get it.  We have to plan ahead.  And if the oceans are going to rise, then we need to make decisions that allow for that.  Government, councils, insurance companies and property owners all can benefit from quality information.

But then there’s this:

In 2014, Commissioner Jan Wright found that New Zealand would be hit by more frequent coastal flooding in the future as sea levels rise.

Today, Dr Wright told the Local Government and Environment Select Committee that she would be releasing a follow-up report identifying infrastructure and property at high risk from rising seas.

Dr Wright said a 30 centimetre rise in sea levels by 2050 was inevitable due to climate change, and what happened after that depended on the global commitment to cutting carbon emissions.

A 30 centimeter rise in 35 years is “inevitable”.  This from a Dr (of something), hired to report to the government.

Let’s just take a deep breath.  30 centimeters in 35 years is close to a centimeter a year. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.