Mental disorder

Gender Identity Disorder and Anorexia are both mental illnesses related to body image

A person with Anorexia does not view their body as fat no matter what the reality is because it is a mental illness

A person with Anorexia does not view their body as fat no matter what the reality is because it is a mental illness

Our society recognises that Anorexia nervosa is a mental illness. We treat sufferers with compassion and we try to help them to gain weight and to see their body through realistic eyes. We don’t tell them that they are fat and are right to starve themselves. We don’t say that that they if they identify with being fat that we will accept their delusion. We don’t tell people that they should be accepting of anorexics’ belief that they are fat. We don’t tolerate Anorexics doing themselves harm by starving themselves. No, we tell them that they are emaciated and we help them.

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai 

Job well done on dealing with bad teachers, now what about proactively tracking down the pedos?

Looks like the Education Council is working well.

Nearly 100 mentally-ill teachers have been investigated by their professional watchdog for misconduct or incompetence in the past six years.

It included incidences of aggressive, violent or threatening behaviour toward children, drug and alcohol use at work, theft, bullying, harassment and falsifying grades, according to information released to Fairfax under the Official Information Act.

Since 2009, 99 teachers referred for investigation by the Education Council over concerns about their practice were found to have a range of disorders, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, substance abuse or addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, ADHD and Asperger’s syndrome.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Coming Out about Depression

A newspaper has an interesting article about coming out about depression and one man’s experiences.

Logging on to my laptop, I emailed my secretary telling her I needed to work from home for a few days after coming down with another bout of flu.

The first bit was certainly true: I could barely get out of bed, never mind leave the house. But what had floored me wasn’t a bug, but another episode of the depression that had dogged my life for as long as I can remember.

Depression that left me paralysed, tearful and unable to cope with the simplest task. Depression that I lied about to myself and concealed from nearly everyone else – certain that revealing the truth would stop my successful career in its tracks.

No wonder. Perceived stigma surrounding mental health problems persists: this week, Ruby Wax, who has courageously spoken about her depression, advised against transparency with employers.

“When people say ‘Should you tell them at work?’ I say ‘Are you crazy?’ You have to lie,” she said.

“If you have someone who is physically ill, they can’t fire you. They can’t fire you for mental health problems but they’ll [find] another reason.”

It’s no coincidence that people use language like “coming out” when confessing to mental health issues. There is the fear that your true self will not be accepted, or that it could be held against you. It has taken me years to realise the opposite is true: in my case, being open about my struggles with depression with peers and seniors has liberated me.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Mike King discusses his depression

I first met Mike King when he invited me as a guest on the Nutter’s Club…that night he threw me a curve ball…he asked me to fill in for him for 4 weeks as host.

I was thrown in the deep end, but it was an opportunity that I really appreciated. I still appreciate the trust he passed to me to take over his show for a few weeks when we had only really just met

It is no secret that Mike suffers depression…and we are lucky that he shares his trials and tribulations in defeating this evil affliction.

Mike covers many of the same things that I deal with on a day to day basis.

Also have a listen to him talk to Duncan Garner about this post from Facebook.

I have a confession to make, for the last few months I have been struggling with depression. At first I thought I was just having a few bad days and it would pass, but as the days turned into weeks and the weeks turned into months things got worse. But here’s the thing, instead of recognising I had a problem, I thought everybody else was the problem. That’s the nature of depression. When you’re in it, it overwhelms you. Little by little it takes over, it dominates and then finally it suffocates you. I became highly sensitive and very negative. Other people’s looks and comments would be misinterpreted which led to frustration and anger, followed by regret, remorse and inevitably back to anger. A vicious cycle that kept repeating itself day in day out. And still I didn’t think I had a problem, “surely it was everyone else’s fault, after all I’m the one who’s getting hurt” was my reasoning. To cope I threw myself into my mahi, and when I wasn’t working I was painting, anything to keep myself busy, anything to stop that annoying voice in my head telling me I was useless.

The turning point came 4 weeks ago in Dunedin while I was filming a tv show with my good friend Dale Husband. Dale is one of those beautiful souls who sees the good in everything and everyone and likes nothing more than brightening people’s days with a kind word. Anyway we were standing in the Octagon getting ready for another full on day of filming when Dale started charming a group of locals and making them laugh. The first thought that popped in my head when I heard them was “oh for f•*k sake will you shut up! No one can be that happy all the time, surely?”
And that’s when the penny dropped. Within a millisecond of that thought popping in my head I said out loud to myself “you’ve got a problem and you need to get it sorted!”.

This was followed by the weirdest feeling in the world. On the one hand the weight of the world had been lifted off my shoulders as I took ownership of my situation. On the other hand I was overcome with emotion and guilt when I realised what a nightmare I must have put my loved ones through while fighting my demons. I remember seeing the apprehension in Jo’s eyes when I got back to the motel that night obviously wondering which Mike would be walking in the door and the relief when I asked her to make an appointment for me with the doctor “because I think I’ve got my depression back”. That’s when she hugged me and said “that’s a really good idea babe” but I knew in her head she was saying “thank f•*k for that” and rightly so.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

All about Beau Murrah

UPDATE: Beau Murrah has now apologised for his offensive comments. However, as I believe in context, removing this post really isn’t an option as it would remove context. To remove it would only leave an apology hanging without the context in which it was given. That could lead to further injustice as people could assume that something far worse was said.

Yesterday I posted a quiz on Facebook that works out where in the US political spectrum you sit. That attracted a number of comments mostly about politics. Then out of the blue this comment was left by someone called Beau Murrah:

There were no trolling comments before that comment, but what galled me was his calling for me to consider “pulling a Charlotte Dawson”.

For those who aren’t aware, last week, after constant harassment on Twitter my friend Charlotte Dawson made an attempt on her own life.

Yesterday was also World Suicide Prevention Day.

So on Suicide Prevention day and just a day after I was host on The Nutters Club dealing with tough mental health issues, I have a random person I have never met encouraging me to kill myself. Lovely.

What is worse is that this person is, according to his LinkedIn profile, was previously employed as a law clerk for [redacted, former employer is innocent party], a prominent ACC specialist lawyer.  [redacted, former employer is innocent party] is prominent in criticising and attacking ACC with numerous quotes in the media from himself.

Beau Murrah says on his LinkedIn profile:

I have a strong interest in Law and Medicine and Public Health Law. I have particular interests in topics such as drug reform, regulation of the pharmaceutical industry, disability law and the use of New Zealand Sign Language as an official language.

I have greatly enjoyed gaining experience in the ACC field as a law clerk for an experienced advocate. I wish to build upon this in the future ideally working in a law and health related field.

Beau Murrah - Turtle molester

Beau Murrah – Turtle Molester

And yet he tells people they should go kill themselves. I’m not sure that he has grasped the sensitive nature of dealing with mental health issues nor ACC with comments to people on their facebook page that they should kill themselves.

Worse still though is his resignation statement from Young NZ First where he states:

Murrah also fired a few parting shots at the NZ First Party, describing a culture of “incompetence, bullying, and intimidation” within the party. “I joined the party because I supported a lot of their economic policy, but when you get in there it’s an incompetent, shadowy circus.”

He seems to like this own bullying and intimidation. Evil and corrupt Winston Peters may be but i bet he has never told someone to go and kill themselves…on World Suicide Prevention Day.

When confronted with the appalling nature of wishing someone would kill themselves he then said:

I wasn’t suggesting you make a suicide attempt but I was wondering if you were considering it since I was still under the impression you were a gutless bludger feeding on internet aggravation. I probably would say any/all of these things to your face by the way.

So he wasn’t suggesting making an attempt, but then asks if I am considering it.

Beau Murrah is a nasty piece work and certainly isn’t someone who should be working with sensitive ACC claimants while he holds such contemptable views on suicide and mental health issues.

His actions certainly aren’t the actions of a someone considering their “professionals” as they need to be a fit and proper person. Suggesting someone kills themselves and attacking them for their mental health issues and using terms such as mentally ill dole bludger when you are acting as an ACC advocate really doesn’t make the grade for “fit and proper”.

He gloats though that he “successfully trolled” me. Perhaps he won’t be gloating so much now. I did warn him NFWAB.

Mental health issues like depression, suicide and everything else that goes along with that are hard enough to deal with on a daily basis without cocksmokers like Beau Murrah coming along and having fun trolling.

I am just lucky that I am somewhat more resilient than other people. He needs to learn that sometimes the bully gets a smacking. Dollars to donuts though he claimed he was “fraped“. But sometimes you have to be held to account.

UPDATE: Beau Murrah has now apologised for his offensive comments. However, as I believe in context, removing this post really isn’t an option as it would remove context. To remove it would only leave an apology hanging without the context in which it was given. That could lead to further injustice as people could assume that something far worse was said.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

"I could have started a blog, but that's the first sign of mental illness" – Michael Laws

Someone is touchy. Michael Laws is very touchy. He decides to label all bloggers as having a mental illness and suggests he isn’t there yet.

Well F*ck you Michael.

In the middle of Movember you decide to label bloggers as suffering from mental illness. Well welcome to the sh*t-storm that all bloggers will unleash upon you for calling us all mental.

To Donate to Movember, you can either:

•    Click this link http://nz.movember.com/donate/your-details/member_id/17568/ and donate online using your credit card or PayPal account
•    Write a cheque payable to ‘Movember Foundation,’ referencing my Registration Number 17568 and mailing it to: Movember Foundation, PO Box 12708, Wellington, 6144

I have always been up front about my own personal battle with Depression. I have fronted on my own demons. It is time Michael Laws started confronting his own demons, and they are considerable. It is time that bloggers and media everywhere started calling this blackmailer, bullshit artist on his crap and started outing his reprehensible bullying and predator behaviour.

There is power in speaking the truth, something Michael Laws is a stranger to.

I wonder what his fellow Radio host at Radio Live, Mike King thinks about such labels during Movember, an event that Mike King is an ambassador for. I wonder too what John Kirwan thinks of such comments during Movember.

Michaels Laws is a cowardly little weak man with a body like a half sucked throatie. By abusing bloggers for their mental health has just added him to my sh*t-list, a list from which no one ever gets off.

Here is a video that Michael laws would do well to heed. (WARNING: NSFW, Do not play at work)

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Music is medicine, music is sanity

A follow up for readers on my post yesterday about “poison pills“. I mentioned how I found music useful in combating my depression. My psychologist read the article and pointed me at this TED speech by Robert Gupta about his experience working with Nathaniel Anthony Ayers and how music helped with his mental illness.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.