Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

Mental Health Break

The news that everyone had been waiting for finally came through on the morning of 12 November 1918 – a Tuesday. Germany had surrendered and signed an armistice with the Allies the previous day.

The government had received the news late on the evening of 11 November. By the early hours it had leaked out to a few people – Prime Minister William Massey was treated to cheers and songs about 2 a.m. But the first most people knew was when Massey officially released it later that morning. He arranged for the message ‘Armistice signed’ to go to the country’s post and telegraph offices shortly before 9 a.m.

In Wellington the signal guns went off at 9 a.m. People quickly deserted their ‘desks and benches and counters’. Many gathered outside the Parliamentary Library at 10.30 a.m. to hear the Governor-General’s formal announcement and his correspondence with the King, and sing the national anthem. Speechmaking and singing started at the Town Hall about lunchtime, and later in the day there were processions and a thanksgiving service at the Basin Reserve. Parliament adjourned for the day.
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Set as a descant to Pachelbel’s timeless 1694 composition Canon in D, this modern rendering features choral versions of; Streets of London, Let it Be, Puff, Down Under, and Go West …

Mental Health Break

Still in Iceland, Gardar Cortes sings Nella Fantasia