Metro

Brussels terrorism hits the US primaries

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Waterboarding, the practice of pouring water over someone’s face to simulate drowning as an interrogation tactic, was banned by President Barack Obama days after he took office in 2009.

Critics call it torture.

“I am in the camp where you have to get the information, and you have to get it rapidly,” Mr Trump said, adding “liberal” laws in Europe had made it hard to counter potential attacks.

Mr Trump, who has called for a temporary ban on Muslims entering the country, also reiterated the need for tougher measures to stop the flow of illegal immigrants, particularly Syrian refugees, across the border.

“As president… I would be very, very tough on the borders, and I would be not allowing certain people to come into this country without absolute perfect documentation,” said Mr Trump. Read more »

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David Cohen on Metro’s most influential list

David Cohen at NBR takes apart Metro’s pathetic attempt at defining the most influential Aucklanders list.

Do media consumers need another extended best-of list?

No, we most certainly do not. You get to the end of these damn things feeling none the wiser about anything in particular, realising as you do that that’s 30 or so minutes of your life that you’ll never get back.

But hey, they’re harmless fun, as much so for the readers as compilers of exercises such as this month’s cover story in Metro of the “most influential” Aucklanders.

Talk about quick and easy. An editor and his senior writers sit around in an office. Presently they are joined by some senior contributors. The secretary serves coffee. Together they trawl their files and memories. Soon enough, hey presto, a new ranking is born.

Does any of this actually matter? Well, yes and no.

Reputations are important. People constantly make judgments on the basis of available information – some of it accurate, some not – and what they decide has consequences.

Yet measuring influence is a messy affair.

Read more »

Our Friends: Cameron and John Slater, by David Slack

Now, don’t be shocked or anything, but David Slack just regurgitated a 2010 METRO hit piece on me through my father.

Just in case you were wondering where he stood.  He’s also posted it to the Kiwi Journalists Association Facebook page (couldn’t even find a friend to do it for him – self promotion – so ugly), so I’m sure he wouldn’t mind me showing you too

Credit:  Daron Parton.

Credit: Daron Parton.

John: The boy’s not an embarrassment, not at all.

He can get a bit confused, though. But then he grew up with cabinet ministers traipsing through our house and hitting the gin. Let’s be honest, our people can be a bit confusing.

First, we think you should leave the Yarpies alone, then we agree apartheid was terrible. First, compulsory saving is communism, then it’s policy. First we like the warships, then nuclear free’s the way to go. Except at lunch in Washington, of course!

And of course we think the gays are perfectly okay these days, although the boy still gets a bit toey about that.

He’s 40 years old but some days I look at him and I still see the kid who came home from school with a sore bum and a story to tell.

He was 11. Some little bugger had copied his work and they’d both got a D. I said to him, “Did you put around some rumours about him? That’s how we do it in the party.” He said, “No way. I whacked him, then I got on his desk, pulled down my trousers and dumped on his books.”

Well that wasn’t my way, but I thought good on him. He got stuck in.

He’s had a bit of bad luck, of course. Read more »