Michael Meyer

Corporates build their own newsrooms, feed the corporate media

Andrew Sullivan is a little despondent in his post about corporate newsrooms.

He suggests that sponsored articles or native advertising will win:

Because journalists will make far more money from it than the old, ethical variety. Because no one has come up with a business model that can compete with it for moolah. And, above all, because readers don?t really give a shit:

The article he quotes next is an interesting one, where Columbia Journalism Review looks at corporate newsrooms.

Not ones built by corporate media, but rather ones built be corporates to write their own content to feed to a lazy media.

By next year, Coca-Cola hopes to have killed the press release. It believes the corporate website is dead, and it?s shifting its money away from television advertising. It has little use for journalists who aren?t interested in stories Coke wants to tell. Instead, it?s decided that producing its own content is better than relying on others.

To that end, Coke?and Nestl? and Chipotle and Volkswagen and countless other companies?have blown up their marketing departments in recent years. They?ve infused them with something that looks closer to a newsroom, producing glossy magazines, blog networks, reported articles, long-form narratives, and compelling videos. One Volkswagen video alone, filmed in a Hong Kong movie theater, has drawn almost 29 million viewers on YouTube, proof that you don?t have to work in a newsroom to understand the dynamics of social media. Or check out a site produced by Red Bull on surfing: It?s filled with spectacular photography, short documentaries, the latest news on surfing, and very little about Red Bull energy drinks.

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