mick Jagger

Photo of the Day

John Phillips may easily be called one of the best pop songwriters of the later 20th century. He honed his songwriting and arranging skills with singing groups that gained a modicum of success. But his crowning musical achievement was the work he did with his '60s group the Mamas and the Papas. Photo: MTV

John Phillips may easily be called one of the best pop songwriters of the later 20th century. He honed his songwriting and arranging skills with singing groups that gained a modicum of success. But his crowning musical achievement was the work he did with his ’60s group the Mamas and the Papas. Photo: MTV

Forbidden Fruit

A Lifetime of Debauched and Reckless Behaviour

John Phillips, destructiveness was too extravagant even for Keith Richards, who once kicked Phillips out of his house for being too uncontrollable

Unlike some other musician/addiction profiles, the John Phillips story is not necessarily one with a cheerful ending.

Mackenzie Phillips, his daughter, was 10 years old when her father taught her how to roll a joint. She had her first taste of cocaine at age 11. At 14, she landed a role in the film?American Graffiti?, and one week after her 18th birthday, she was arrested for the first time.

When she was 10, her dad gave her, her first adult job.

?Dad said, ?I?m going to give you a project,? Dad had a job for me! This was exciting. I was in.?

?I got really good at rolling joints. I was the official joint roller for all the adults.?

McKenzie?says she was allowed so much freedom as a kid that the only rules her dad gave her were to spend one night a week at home and to always change her clothes before returning in the early morning.

?A lady never wears evening clothes during the day. It?s cheap,? John Phillips, who died in 2001, told her.

He did have one boundary. One day, Mackenzie found a purple pill in her dad?s bedroom.

She instinctively took it. But it turned out not to be just any pill ? it was the last of the LSD pills made by the famous drug cook Owsley Stanley, and it was a collector?s item among moneyed celebrity druggies of the time.

?It was as if I?d crashed a normal dad?s Porsche, he said, ?You took my last hit of Owsley. You?re grounded!? ?

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photographed by Jack Robinson, Vogue, September 1971. Carly Simon.

Photographed by Jack Robinson, Vogue, September 1971.
Carly Simon.

You’re So Vain?

In January of 1973,?You’re So Vain?was the # 1 hit song on the radio. Carly Simon had just married fellow pop-superstar James Taylor a month before, so when?You’re So Vain?hit the airwaves, it stirred intense curiosity about which one of her previous lovers was the subject of this wry nod to the male ego.

A radio station in Los Angeles had their listeners call in to cast their ballot as to who they thought the song was about. Was it Mick Jagger? Cat Stevens? Warren Beatty? Kris Kristofferson? It was common knowledge that she had been involved with each of them in the past. To this day, she is still asked the question “Who is You’re So Vain about??

Will you ever reveal who You’re So Vain is about?

I don’t see why I ever would. What would it advance? I wrote that song in the days when people kept confidences to themselves.?Carly Simon

?Was ?You?re So Vain about Warren Beatty?
It certainly sounds like it was about Warren Beatty. He certainly thought it was about him – he called me and said thanks for the song. At the time I met him he was still relatively undiscovered as a Don Juan. I felt I was one among thousands at that point ? it hadn?t reached, you know, the populations of small countries.?Carly Simon
The Washington Post 1983

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Dominique Tarl?  Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg outside Villa Nellc?te with their son Marlon.

Photo: Dominique Tarl?
Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg outside Villa Nellc?te with their son Marlon.

The Rolling Stones? French Villa of Debauchery

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

 Photographer: Anton Corbijn: Mick Jagger,1996.


Photographer: Anton Corbijn: Mick Jagger,1996.

Rolling Stones Concert Review – Macau

If David Farrar can get away with reviewing boring plays then for my election year comeback to blogging I can warm up by reviewing the best show in the world. -?Cactus?Kate?

There was an horrific moment when in Sunday nights epic Macau Rolling Stones gig we saw what the band would have been like if Mick Jagger was hit by a bad eight ball and Keith Richards became front man. It was the stuff of nightmares with the only suitable remedy a quick trip to the concession stand.

I first heard the Stones music when the third man with a twenty (mumble) year age gap I semi co-habited with made me listen to them every second I was with him. In the morning most “older” men read the paper in a polite ritualistic request for silent time originating ?from too much time alone with the first wife. He would regurgitate Stones trivia. As a result of environmental necessity I absorbed quite a bit but never questioned his claim to have seen the Stones in Auckland in 1966. ?The maths didn’t add up.

When relationships are over less fortunate and far needier women often get a too large home, European car or beachfront bach. ?Some of them even get custody of high maintenance things like children. I got something way cooler – not only an almost complete education but all of his Rolling Stones CDs. With the advent of iTunes I was eventually able to respectfully courier them back to their home.

During this past decade of OE I’ve never been in the right place to watch a Stones concert. As luck would have it this time I was. ?It did mean going to the Mainland sewer of sin and trekking through the smoke filled Venetian casino floor in a quest to seek my more than adequate accommodation. It was so adequate that but for the concert downstairs I would never have left. ?As it was true to Macau form I never left the hotel complex I stayed at.? Read more »

Abolish Maori seats, Roundtable study urges

Abolish Maori seats, Roundtable study urgesMaori seats in Parliament should be abolished and the ethnically justified basis for them is “repugnant” and amount to “reverse discrimination” under MMP, according to Business Roundtable-sponsored research.
But the report has…
[NZ Politics]

Good show, with MMP the seats are no longer needed.

[quote]Professor Joseph said putting aside the seven Maori seats, the 15 other Maori representatives in Parliament put it a little under 2 per cent short of reflecting the 14 per cent national population.

However, with the Maori seats the current parliamentary representation equated to 22 per cent.

The research said that would be fine if the MPs were all elected under MMP; it wasn’t fair to “gift” seats to Maori based on ethnicity.[/quote]

Hard to argue with that. If proportionality is supposed to work for everyone else then why not for Maori, unless of course they hold some sort of special citizen status.

?