military

Photo of the Day

The 47 suitcases seized by police in a private residence at Villeneuve at the Seine Assize Court during the trial of French mass murderer Dr Marcel Petiot. The cases contain clothes which were identified by relatives of some of his victims. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

The 47 suitcases seized by police in a private residence at Villeneuve at the Seine Assize Court?during the trial of French mass murderer Dr Marcel Petiot. The cases contain clothes which were identified by relatives of some of his victims. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

Dangerous Lunatic

The Monster of Rue Le Sueur

Meet the French doctor who promised Jews safe passage from Nazis, only to rob and murder them

To all who knew him, he was the most devoted, benevolent doctor in Nazi-occupied Paris. Dr Marcel Petiot provided free care for the poor and risked his life helping persecuted Jews flee to safety.
Or so everyone thought ? until locals in his affluent neighbourhood reported a foul stench from his home and thick black smoke pouring out of his chimney in March 1944.

Nazi-occupied Paris was a terrible place to be in the waning days of World War Two, with Jews, Resistance fighters and ordinary citizens all hoping to escape. Disappearances became so common they often weren?t followed up.

And one man used the lawlessness for his own terrible purposes, killing perhaps as many as 60 people.

Petiot?s criminal career stretched from his teenage years to his mid-life, and ran parallel to a successful military, political, and medical career. He was a real life Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

The inherent grisliness of murder makes it hard ? if not impossible ? to describe any murderer as ?better? or ?worse? than another. Still, Marcel Andr? Henri F?lix Petiot was truly superlative in his horror, mainly because of the circumstances and motivations behind his acts: He promised safety and freedom to those leaving Nazi-occupied France, only to strip them of their possessions and lives.

Despite his infamy in France, many elsewhere have never heard his story. As with many serial killers, internal struggle marked much of P?tiot?s early life.

Born on January 17th, 1897, he was the son of a civil servant, and?his uncle, Gaston Petiot, was a professor of philosophy at the College of Auxerre.?From childhood he showed signs of violence, after he strangled a cat after plunging its legs in boiling water.

However, he showed great intelligence, at 5 years old he was reading like a 10-year-old child. He then was found distributing obscene images when he was eight.?Interned at St. Anne for a psychiatric disorder, his mother died when he was 12, he was then subsequently sent to several schools for discipline, but exhibited severe behavioural problems in school and was expelled several times before completing his education.

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Photo Of The Day

The Dyatlov hikers leaving Vizhay en route to sector 41. Photo from Dyatlov hikers recovered camera.1959

The Dyatlov hikers leaving Vizhay en route to sector 41. Photo from Dyatlov hikers recovered camera.1959

?Dyatlov Pass Incident?

?It was January 27th?1959; a group of nine friends from the nearby Ural Polytechnic institute took off on a hiking trip in the Ural Mountains, across the Sverdlovsk Oblast.

Lead by Igor Dyatlov, they set off along a category 3 climb route, which was a welcome challenge for the group of experienced skiers and hikers, and something that they were looking forward to as they posed smiling in group photos throughout the journey. One of the members of the team, Yuri Yudin, got sick and had to turn back a day before the incident. Unbeknownst to him, he would be the only one to escape the tragic fate that awaited the rest of the expedition.

The group accidentally deviated off course and despite intentions to head up to the Ororten Mountain ended up on Kholat Syakhl, which roughly translates as ?mountain of the dead?. The weather was getting progressively worse and they were forced to set up camp with the intention of turning back the following morning- unfortunately they never got the chance.

Search parties, police and military set off in hopes of finding the nine lost hikers. Six days later the Dyatlov camp was discovered. The group?s tent was torn from the inside out. The search party followed fresh sets of footsteps to the edge of the forest where they discovered a burned out fire and two corpses wearing only underwear and shoes. The discovery of three more corpses was made nearby, spaced around 150 meters apart.

The authorities concluded that each person appeared as if they were trying to make it back to the campsite, due to the posing of the bodies. The other team members were found further away, under 4 meters of snow near a lake.

It was first suspected that the group had died of hypothermia and exposure, however there was elements contradicting the theory. For example, the bodies were outside and unclothed, two of which had skull damage, and two with chest fractures. A coroner reported that the force needed to cause the impact of such injuries could be likened to the impact made during a car crash.

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Media just making stuff up about SAS

Yesterday the Herald ran an article suggesting that NZSAS troops could be deployed to Iraq to battle ISIS.

The problem with that article was that John Key actually said it was his least preferred option for dealing with ISIS.

Today they follow it up with an outright denial, not once but twice from Jonathan Coleman, but not content with that they run off to a journalist and an academic for them to suggest, that just maybe, possibly, the NZSAS might already be overseas or getting ready to deploy overseas.

You can’t make this up…the Minister says no and they think maybe it might be something else.

Defence Minister Jonathan Coleman has dismissed suggestions the elite SAS force is ready and waiting for the green light to go into combat against Isis (Islamic State) militants in Iraq. ? Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photograph: ?esterreichische Nationalbibliothek. This photograph is from the collection of the Imperial and Royal War Press Bureau.  'Unloading of a horse in Tschanak Kale (Turkey)'

Photograph: ?esterreichische Nationalbibliothek. This photograph is from the collection of the Imperial and Royal War Press Bureau.
‘Unloading of a horse in Tschanak Kale (Turkey)’

Millions of animals were relied upon by all sides in World War One

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Nationaal Archief

Photo: Nationaal Archief

New Technologies Developed During World War I

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Photo Of The Day

Mum's Army: A sergeant drilling civilian members of the Women's Home Defence Corps, in the use of rifles during the Battle of Britain in 1940.

Mum’s Army: A sergeant drilling civilian members of the Women’s Home Defence Corps, in the use of rifles during the Battle of Britain in 1940.

Happy Mothers Day!

Map of the Day

Military Conscription Policy by Country

Military Conscription Policy By Country.

Could John arrange some of these for here?

raptortanker

A USAF presence at Ohakea would be good for the local economy and all the ugly women that live in Palmerston North.

The United States Air Force will dramatically expand its military presence across the Pacific this year, sending jets to Thailand, India, Singapore, and Australia, according to the service’s top general in the region.

For a major chunk of America’s military community, the so-called “pivot to Asia” might seem like nothing more than an empty catch phrase – especially with the Middle East once again in flames. But for the Air Force, at least, the shift is very real. And the idea behind their pivot is simple: ring China with U.S. and allied forces, just like the West did to the Soviet Union, back in the Cold War.

U.S. military officials constantly say they aren’t trying to contain China; they’re working with the Chinese and other Pacific nations to ?maintain stability’ in the region. Still, a ring of bases looks an awful lot like something we’ve seen before.? Read more »

So this is what guns were made for!

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Thanks and Well Done

Our NZDF boys and girls have completed their mission in Bamiyan and are returning home.

Photo: NZDF

Photo: NZDF

The?New Zealand?flag has been lowered for the final time at Kiwibase in Bamiyan marking the official close of the Provincial Reconstruction Team and this country’s 10-year involvement with it.

The?United States?and Malaysian flag, representing other nations in the PRT, were also lowered leaving the Afghan flag flying alone.? Read more »