Missouri

Photo of the Day

Bo Bowencamp then aged 72. Ken Rex McElroy was found guilty of second-degree assault in the shooting of grocer Bo Bowencamp.

Death of a Bully

Ken Rex McElroy – The Most Hated Man in Missouri

Ken Rex McElroy shared something with the townspeople he tormented, something beyond the years of accumulated tension. McElroy most likely didn?t see who shot him from behind in broad daylight near the town?s major intersection. To hear Skidmore?s citizens tell it, neither did they.

Thirty-six years later, their stories remain unchanged.

Ken Rex McElroy was a big, mean jerk of a bully who was allowed for years to wreak criminal, mental, physical and sociological havoc on his community of Skidmore, Missouri. And then somebody shot him dead in front of dozens of witnesses in daylight. Everybody knows who did it. But everybody shut up. And the town kept silent.?Apparently, McElroy was mean enough to unite a town of plain, good people to do murder. He had terrorised Skidmore for years.

Many trucking towns across the United States have died a slow death since the railroads’ heydey in the late 1800s. Few small towns, however, have seen the level of tragedy that Skidmore, Missouri, has. Within a generation, the town has seen an unsolved killing in front of at least 60 witnesses, a pregnant woman stalked and killed for her baby, and a young man go missing from his backyard.

Skidmore, Missouri is a very small town. In the ?70s, there was only one bar, one grocery store, and one bully. Ken McElroy was so ruthless and intimidating that even law enforcement looked the other way. He terrorised the town for decades until they finally fought back. Ken Rex McElroy, 47, was an awful, burly man with bushy sideburns, cold eyes and an ever-present gun.

Small towns are reputed to be close. Almost like family. Residents stick together. They have your back. They protect you. They keep your secrets. In 1981, in the tiny farming town of Skidmore, Missouri, Ken McElroy was gunned down in broad daylight, in the middle of the town?s main street, in front of as many as 60 witnesses. In spite of three grand jury investigations and an FBI probe, no indictments were ever issued, no trial held – and the town of Skidmore has protected the killer with silence.

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Photo of the Day

By far one the most bizarre events at the Olympics that year was the marathon. Ultimately, English-born Tom Hicks was named the winner. However, Hicks didn’t have the exciting victory that one might dream of. Hicks had such a horrible race he never raced again after the event. Like the other runners, he was deeply affected by the heat and dust, but his two-man support team wouldn’t give him any water. Instead, they gave him a shot of egg whites and strychnine, which was a popular performance supplement at the time.

In 1904, St. Louis Hosted the First Olympics on American Soil

?It was Kind of a Mess?

We know strychnine as a poison, but in the right dose, it can act as a stimulant, too. It was so popular in the Victorian era that athletes would dope up using strychnine or coca leaves before events. The first US Olympics had their marathon won by a man who made it across the finish line driven by brandy, strychnine, and egg whites (and another who was just driven), and it was also common practice in a strange sport called ?the wobbles.?

The 1904 Olympics, the first to be held on U.S. soil ? in St. Louis, Missouri, and they were a mess. Doping, shameful ?Anthropology Days? competitions among ?savages? and minimal international participation were a recipe for a games that the Wall Street Journal once dubbed ?Comedic, Disgraceful And ‘Best Forgotten.??

You can’t really fault the multiple instances of cheating during the 1904 St. Louis Olympics marathon since it was basically a 26-mile Benny Hill skit that included one top contender being chased off the course by wild dogs, and another running in wingtips and trousers.?The original winner of the race was Fred Lorz, a future Boston Marathon winner who led for nine miles before dropping out due to cramps, and then, after accepting a ride to the stadium, figured he’d play a joke on the crowd and jog triumphantly to the winner’s circle.

He even received the champion’s wreath from President Teddy Roosevelt’s daughter before admitting to his hitchhiking. So instead, American Thomas Hicks, who was kept upright for ten miles by regular doses of strychnine and brandy, and who was effectively carried across the finish line by his coaches, won the gold because no one wanted to see the French second place finisher walk away with the victory.

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Photo of the Day

Robin Doan photographed March 12, 2014, near Palo Duro Canyon. Photo: DARREN BRAUN.

Robin Doan photographed March 12, 2014, near Palo Duro Canyon. Photo: DARREN BRAUN.

?The Girl Who Saw Too Much

A?Texas family is gunned down in a deadly home invasion — but the shooter unknowingly leaves behind a witness.

In the fall of 2005, a young Missouri man, 23-year-old Levi King, went on a vicious and inexplicable 24-hour killing spree, first shooting an elderly man and his daughter-in-law in the rural community of Pineville, Missouri, then stealing their truck and driving to Texas, where he randomly stopped at a darkened farm house on the outskirts of the small Panhandle town of Pampa.

Dressed completely in black and toting an AK-47, King broke through the back door and immediately went to the master bedroom. He first put three bullets into the body of the home?s owner, 31-year-old Brian Conrad. He next fired two shots into Molly, the family?s dog. Then he turned his gun on Conrad?s 35-year-old pregnant wife, Michell, who was screaming. He shot her five times.

Michell?s ten-year-old daughter from a previous marriage, Robin Doan, was at the end of the hallway, crouched by her bedroom door, which was partially open. She saw King walk out of her mother and stepfather?s bedroom and head her way. She ran back to her bed and pulled the covers over her head. He stepped into her bedroom, aimed his gun at her, and pulled the trigger. The shot went wide, hitting a pillow, but Robin made a grunting noise and fell to the floor, pretending she was dead. King fell for her act. He turned around, walked into a third bedroom, and shot Robin?s fourteen-year-old brother, Zach. King then walked into the kitchen and rummaged around for food before driving away.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: William Ahrendt. John Colter, out for beaver.

Photo: William Ahrendt.
John Colter, out for beaver.

Colter?s Run

The sinewy, bearded man raced up the brushy hillside, blood streaming from his nose from the terrific exertion. He did not consider himself a fast runner, but on this occasion the terror of sudden and agonizing death lent wings to his feet.

Somewhere not far behind, his pursuers, their lean bodies more accustomed than his to the severe terrain, were closing in, determined to avenge the death of one of their own. They carried weapons, though they were unlikely to grant their quarry a quick and easy death if they caught him.

All of these thoughts coursed through frontiersman John Colter?s mind as he ran for his life. Although an able shot and capable fighter, Colter?s only assets at the moment were the muscles in his already-exhausted legs. His pursuers had taken his gun and knife, and had stripped him of every last stitch of clothing. The sagebrush and scrub oak tore at Colter?s thighs as he ran, and sharp stones gouged the soles of his feet, but he paid the pain no mind; any torment was preferable to what the Blackfoot warriors would inflict on him if they captured him again.

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KKK?s former Grand Dragon caught nuts deep in black male hooker

History of violence: Cross originally went by the name Frazier Glenn Miller (pictured in 1985) and created two racist and anti-Semitic groups and was once caught with a black prostitute who was a man masquerading as a woman

History of violence: Cross originally went by the name Frazier Glenn Miller (pictured in 1985) and created two racist and anti-Semitic groups and was once caught with a black prostitute who was a man masquerading as a woman

Authorities have uncovered a lot of astounding details regarding former Ku Klux Klan leader Frazier Glenn Miller, who is accused of killing three people this month at a Jewish Community Center in Kansas.

The?former Grand Dragon of the KKK was been caught nuts deep in a black male hooker back in 1986.

Frazier Glenn Cross, the man accused of murder in the shootings of three people outside Jewish facilities in Kansas last week was, for all practical purposes, born at the age of 49. ? ?

The federal government gave him that name when he was released from prison in 1990, along with a new social security number and a new place to live, not far from the Missouri River in western Iowa.

The idea was to erase any connection to the man he had been before: Frazier Glenn Miller. White Nationalist leader. Spewer of hate. Federal informant.

?I joined the family in Sioux City, Iowa,? Miller wrote later in his self-published autobiography. ?I enrolled in truck driving school?and I?ve been trucking ever since. And I love it. After prison, the freedom of the open road is gloriously exhilarating.?

This guy is a piece of work, going back decades. A life of hate…that is likely to be ended by the death penalty in Kansas.

In the early morning hours of April 30, 1987, more than three dozen federal and state law enforcement agents surrounded a mobile home in Ozark, Missouri. ?A van recently purchased by Miller in Louisiana had been spotted outside by an agent the day before.

A volley of tear gas was fired and then, just after 7 a.m, ?four men emerged and gave themselves up.

Among them was Miller, the founder of Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan?and the paramilitary White Patriot Party in North Carolina. The United States Marshals Service had issued a nationwide bulletin seeking Miller?s arrest after he disappeared while appealing his conviction for criminal contempt.

Agents recovered hand grenades, automatic rifles, pistols and flak jackets inside the trailer, according to FBI statements at the time. Explosives experts from nearby Fort Leonard Wood were called in to detonate a box containing about twenty pipe bombs.? Read more »

Sledge of the Day

Todd Akin is behind in polls in the race against Claire?McCaskill for the senate seat of Missouri. It isn’t surprising that he is behind with his recent comments about “legitimate rape” in a gaffe-fest that was memorable for his ill informed and misogynist attitude.

For her part McCaskill has been aggressive in attacking Akin, and Akin isn’t pleased. He resorted to form with a patronising and condescending comment about her acting in manner that was less lady-like than her last election contest.

McCaskill has fired up and back:

“I don’t know exactly what his accusation that I’m not ladylike means,” McCaskill said. “I’m a former courtroom prosecutor and I try to be strong and informed. And I think the debate was tough for Todd, because I went through the list of his very, very extreme positions and I think that maybe he wasn’t prepared to answer to some of that, and so they went back to, I think, that old, ‘Gosh she was mean and unladylike.'”

Expressing the hope that his remarks would motivate her supporters, McCaskill targeted Akin as a “fringe” candidate who would never works to solve problems through compromise.

“If you look at some of the things that Todd Akin has said over the years… this is somebody who kind of makes Michele Bachmann look like a hippie,” she said.

Mitt Romney has a bad day at the Office

Mitt?Romney?has had a really bad day at?the?office losing two and possibly three primaries.

Santorum has been?declared?the winner in Missouri and Minnesota. In Minnesota, Romney is currently?trailing?Santorum by almost 30 points and Ron Paul (!) is ahead of Romney by 10. Santorum is also?ahead?in Colorado, but very few votes have come in thus far. Josh Marshall?finds?no silver lining for Mitt.

Rick Santorum won Missouri and Minnesota convincingly, in Missouri he won every county. The turn out is low though and so Santorum cannot claim much other than a moral victory.

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