Mobile telecommunications

Cellphones fry your brain…oh wait…no they don’t

tinfoilhat

The tinfoil hat brigade will tell you that cellphones give you cancer…and when you ask them for evidence they invariably have none but maintain they read it somewhere.

Well now you can read it here…cellphones do not give you cancer.

New research from the University of Auckland shows the risk of brain tumours cannot be linked with with increased mobile phone use.

Professor Mark Elwood, cancer epidemiologist at the University of Auckland, led research on the trends in primary brain incidence in New Zealand between 1995 and 2010. Results indicate there is no general increase in brain tumours as a consequence of using mobile phones.

Elwood?s team examined the frequency (yearly incidence) of brain cancers, both in total and in sub-types highlighted in some other studies, in New Zealand from 1995 to 2010 using data from the New Zealand national cancer registry. ? Read more »

If you are thinking of bugging your partner’s phone you already know the answer

Spying on cellphones of partners is on the rise.

I suspect it will be more women spying on their partners than the other way around, though when blokes do it isn’t to find out what they are up to it is about being manipulative and controlling.

Still if you are thinking of spying on your partner because you suspect they are playing away then you probably already have your answer.

Spying on spouses and partners through mobile phone bugging systems has reached epidemic proportions, according to pressure groups monitoring electronic abuse in the UK.

They warned women to guard against the growing use of ‘spyware’ which can tell a suspicious husband, boyfriend or former partner how they are using their phones. ? Read more »

A mobile coverage technical dilemma

Screen Shot 2014-09-19 at 9.47.02 pm

I have a technical dilemma.

I have moved house, no you can’t know where I live…because the media will then know. I am not having my family hounded by them again.

However I have a problem.

Mobile coverage.

I am currently with Telecom…and live in a black spot. 200m in any direction and I have full coverage but have no bars at all in most of the house, but out by the fence one bar, or upstairs. This is unacceptable. The network coverage map shows no 4G coverage, little or no 3G coverage nor any other sort of coverage. It is next to useless.

Is there a solution? I’m thinking no, and so have some choices to make. ? Read more »

Hero to Zero now has a Theory

? Boing Boing

A few years back all the cool kids had a Blackberry…they were so popular and addictive they were even nicknamed Crackberrys.

However now when people pull out a Blackberry those of us with iPhones look down on them with pity….sometimes you can even hear the pity…ahhh…ohhh. Likewise RIM’s stock has dropped and the company is now an also ran in the handset market. Basically they fell off a cliff:

I think there are three factors that help create The Cliff. First, there is the replacement cycle. The average replacement cycle for mobile phones in year 2000 was 21 months. By year 2006 it was down to 18 months. Today it is 16 months (all handsets). For smartphones it is even faster, at 11.5 months. A car is replaced something like every 3 or 4 years on average. A TV set once every 7 years. A personal computer every 3 and a half years. But mobile phones are replaced every year and a half, smartphones replaced every year (on average).

So if you have a bad model car, and your sales suffers because of it, you will not lose all your loyal customers in a year or two, because many of your customers have last year’s model and are happy with it, and will not even come to your car dealership until two years from now to consider the replacement model, by which time you have had plenty of time to fix the problems with your current car model.

In mobile phones we do not have that luxury. The pace is so fast. And note that the rate of the collapse due to The Cliff is actually accelerating. This also suggests the replacement cycle and The Cliff are related.

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