Muckraker

Defended by a Herald journalist as well

The Kiwi Journalists Association has a Facebook Group (funny for someone not a journalist I am a member of it…and it is only open for journalists to belong) has a lengthy discussion about me and my appeal.

There is some useful and fair (Rob Hosking) others snobby, wanky, pretentious, and lefty ( Geoff Lealand, Gavin Ellis etc ).

But this comment from Peter Calder brings things to a perfect summary of where things are at and where they should be.

Peter Calder: Gavin Ellis For the record, I regard Slater’s work as odious and repellent. But the relevant section prescribes that a news medium must “[disseminate] to the public or a section of the public … news and observations on news”. It does not say that the observations must be from various sources, just that they be plural.

I can’t see why Slater would be disqualified.

And I am most surprised to see that you and Geoff Lealand, both with academic credentials, would seek to reclassify Slater (you implicitly; Geoff Lealand explicitly) according to the ***quality*** of his contribution to debate. Quality is not mentioned in the definition: if it were, there are many columnists I can think of who should be seeking legal advice before relying on unidentified informants and hoping to rely on the confidentiality of sources.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

A muckraker you say? I can live with that

I have been called all sorts of things, even in court yesterday someone suggested that I was a muckraker, then in a complaint to the Broadcasting Standards Authority I was again described as a muckraker.

What exactly is a muckraker? It sounds awful…what an insult to hurl.

A commenter helpfully provided a link to a definition of “muckraker“.

The term muckraker refers to reform-minded journalists who wrote largely for popular magazines, continued a tradition of investigative journalism reporting, and emerged in the United States after 1900 and continued to be influential until World War I, when through a combination of advertising boycotts, dirty tricks and patriotism, the movement, associated with the Progressive Era in the United States, came to an end.

Before World War I, the term “muckraker” was used to refer in a general sense to a writer who investigates and publishes truthful reports to perform an auditing or watchdog function. In contemporary use, the term describes either a journalist who writes in the adversarial or alternative tradition or a non-journalist whose purpose in publication is to advocate reform and change. Investigative journalists view the muckrakers as early influences and a continuation of watchdog journalism.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.