Murders

Photo of the Day

Baader-Meinhof bomb builder, Dierk Hoff’s most infamous creation: The Baby Bomb. In 1972, Hoff built the so-called “baby bomb”. The construction consisted of a steel container, which a woman could strap on. The container looked like the belly of a pregnant woman. After the supposedly pregnant woman had placed the bomb, she could inflate a balloon, which in turn simulated a fat belly. 

Baader-Meinhof: In Love with Terror 

In October 1977, the leadership of the German left wing terrorist group Baader-Meinhof, died in a German high-security prison. Their apparent suicides hailed the end of a long and bloody struggle to start a revolution in one of the world’s richest democracies.

During the years of 1968-1977 Germany lived in fear. Three terrorist groups – the Red Army Faction (RAF), Movement 2 June, and the Revolutionary Cells (RZ) – gathered about a hundred Germans as their members.

The Baader-Meinhof Gang, who called themselves the Red Army Faction, and two other terrorist groups went killing dozens of people. In 1968 the prominent German journalist Ulrike Meinhof joined the former juvenile delinquent Andreas Baader and his girlfriend Gudrun Ensslin in launching the most terrifying era in German postwar history.

It was the 1967 killing by police of a young activist during a demonstration in Berlin against a visit by the Shah of Iran that apparently persuaded Andreas Baader that the post-war authorities were little better than that which they had replaced.

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Photo of the Day

The Victims

The “Murder House”

Villisca Axe Murder Mystery

In the early 1900’s, Villisca Iowa, a midwestern town of 2500, was flourishing. Businesses lined the streets and several dozen trains pulled into the depot on a daily basis. According to D.N. Smith, a Chicago, Burlington, Quincy Railroad employee, Villisca meant “Pretty Place” or “Pleasant View.”

In 1912, the town built the only publicly funded Armory in the state of Iowa. The Company housed there participated in the 1916 Mexican Expedition, WWI and WWII, as well as the Korean and Vietnam Wars. During World War II, Montgomery County lost more men per capita than any other county in the United States. Villisca surely contributed several of her own to that number.

Unfortunately for the citizens of this close-knit community, however, these accomplishments will be forever overshadowed by the horrific deaths of eight of their own. On June 10, 1912, the tranquility of this “Pretty Place” was shattered by the discovery of the Villisca Axe murders. The Moore Family, well-known and well-liked Villisca residents and two overnight guests were found murdered in their beds. Little known to it’s residents was the possibility that their town was named, not after a “pretty place” but for the Indian word “Wallisca” which means “evil spirit.”

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2015 – A year for the courts

THE UNUSUAL TRIAL OF BLESSIE’S KILLER

The family and friends of murdered Auckland mother-of-three Blessie Gotingco packed out an Auckland courtroom for the trial of her killer Tony Robertson, in April.

Frequent trial delays added to the family’s anguish as Robertson fired his lawyer and proceeded to defend himself, giving evidence and cross examining witnesses, as well as asking for numerous breaks. The trial was notable because Robertson could be photographed but not named, and his admission: “I stabbed Mrs Gotingco.”

In August, Robertson, 28, was sentenced to preventive detention and 24 years minimum non-parole for her murder and preventive detention with a minimum non-parole period of 10 years for her rape. It was later revealed Robertson was on parole for abducting and molesting a five-year-old and was wearing a GPS bracelet when he killed Ms Gotingco.

GPS bracelets don’t work on the criminally insane.  The fact we’ve had people who allowed him out in the community like that means they were criminally negligent.  Yet nobody has ever had to own up for that.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Photo Of The Day

‘Palace Theatre’ (c1940) by Weegee

‘Palace Theatre’ (c1940) by Weegee

Weegee

By Weegee

 ‘Palace Theatre’ (c1940) by Weegee

This is the most wonderful experience for any man or woman to go through.

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Such a shame

I’ve always said that every cell should have a wobbly stool, a length of rope and a good solid anchor point in it. The man rapist of Hamilton appears to have checked out.

The man charged with a series of sex attacks on men in Hamilton has been found dead while on remand.

The 33-year-old was in custody at a Waikato correctional facility. His body was found overnight.

Police said they were not seeking anyone in relation to the death and the matter had been reported to the Coroner. A police spokesman declined to comment further.

The man appeared in the Hamilton District Court last week charged with abducting and sexually assaulting men in the city. He was granted name suppression at the time.

He faced 10 sex charges including two counts of abduction, five counts of sexual violation and one of indecent assault.

The man was due to reappear in court on December 7.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Tagged: