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Tom Petty performs on stage during a 1981 Irvine, California concert. George Rose/Getty Images

Tom Petty

‘Free Fallin”

From his stage presence to his fashion, Tom Petty electrified audiences for decades. Celebrated rocker Tom Petty died at age 66 after suffering cardiac arrest at his California home on Monday. Although the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer is now gone, his music, his charisma, and his one-of-a-kind presence will live on.

After 40 years in the music industry, Tom Petty consistently stayed at the top of the charts.

But while his success never faltered, the “Free Fallin’” singer’s personal life wasn’t quite as smooth sailing. From suffering abuse as a child to going through a difficult divorce and subsequent addiction to heroin, Petty, fought through intense personal troubles to find ultimate happiness with his second wife Dana York.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers recently completed a summer tour with three nights at the Hollywood Bowl. The trek marked the band’s 40th anniversary and found him playing rarely played deep cuts like their first album’s opener, “Rockin’ Around (With You),” and a selection of Wildflowers cuts. It was intended to be his “last trip around the country.” He said though, that it wasn’t his intention to quit playing. “I need something to do, or I tend to be a nuisance around the house.”

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Glen Campbell hosts the NBC television show ‘The Midnight Special’ in 1975. (Photo: Bettman Contributor via Getty Images)

Rhinestone Cowboy

Boyishly handsome and six feet tall, with his “aw shucks, ma’am” charm and velvety voice, Glen Campbell was a legendary country and pop-music singer, guitarist and Hollywood hot guy.

Singer-guitarist and actor Glen Campbell, who was known for hits including “Rhinestone Cowboy,” “Wichita Lineman” and “By the Time I Get to Phoenix,” died yesterday after following a difficult six-year bout with Alzheimer’s disease. He was eighty-one and is survived by his wife and eight children. Campbell is probably best known for “Rhinestone Cowboy,” a song he recorded in 1975, though he released sixty full-length studio albums over the course of a fifty-year career, sending some eighty-two singles up the Billboard charts.

From his humble rural beginnings to his meteoric rise to fame to the long battle with Alzheimer’s that resulted in his death in Nashville, Tennessee, the details of Glen Campbell’s life at times read like the lyrics to one of his melancholy country ballads. But with more than 50 million records sold and a dazzling amount of Top 40 hits in his decades-long career, Campbell’s achievements transcend the trail of heartache and loss that winds through it, ultimately telling a tale of redemption, and of one of the brightest musical lights of the era.

“It is with the heaviest of hearts that we announce the passing of our beloved husband, father, grandfather, and legendary singer and guitarist, Glen Travis Campbell, at the age of 81, following his long and courageous battle with Alzheimer’s disease,” the singer’s family said in a statement.

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Leon Russell's career runs the musical gamut from Sinatra to the Stones, the Beach Boys and BB King. He's written some of the most-covered songs in the pop songbook, and three Stones and two Beatles performed on his debut solo record, yet he isn't a household name. Photo: Getty Images

Leon Russell’s career runs the musical gamut from Sinatra to the Stones, the Beach Boys and BB King. He’s written some of the most-covered songs in the pop songbook, and three Stones and two Beatles performed on his debut solo record, yet he isn’t a household name. Photo: Getty Images

Leon Russell has Gone Back to the Island…

Another one on the way to Rock n’ Roll Heaven

We have just lost Leonard Cohen, and now… Leon Russell.

Musician Leon Russell has died in Nashville at the age of 74. His wife said he died in his sleep.

Leon Russell is a legend. Inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2011, Russell made his name first as an ace session pianist before penning classic hits for himself and others. Besides his music, Russell was known for his striking appearance: wispy white hair halfway down his back and that covered much of his face. Russell played keyboard for the Los Angeles studio team known as the Wrecking Crew, helping producer Phil Spector develop his game-changing wall of sound approach in the 1960s.

He’s also a legendary character. In the 2008 documentary “The Wrecking Crew,” Cher recounts a time that Russell stumbled in late and drunk to a recording session led by legendary producer and future-convicted murderer Phil Spector.

When the insufferable Phil Spector (they were apparently recording one of Spector’s “wall of sound” productions) confronted Russell and asked him if he understood the word respect, Russell jumped on top of his piano and demanded if Spector understood the meaning of a certain two-word expletive phrase that we need not quote. According to Cher, the studio collapsed in hysterics. So, among his many other distinctions, Russell deserves special credit for standing up to one of the music industry’s most notorious jerks.

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Lemmy was the ultimate bachelor. The frontman was never married and he even hated the thought of living with a woman. He once said: "If you move in with someone, you lose all respect for them. All them dirty knickers on the towel rail, all that snorting and farting. Does that appeal to you? Because it doesn't to me. "When you first start dating someone, it's all about being on your best behaviour, and that initial magic. I never wanted the magic to stop." Brilliant.

Lemmy was the ultimate bachelor. The frontman was never married and he even hated the thought of living with a woman. He once said: “If you move in with someone, you lose all respect for them. All them dirty knickers on the towel rail, all that snorting and farting. Does that appeal to you? Because it doesn’t to me. “When you first start dating someone, it’s all about being on your best behaviour, and that initial magic. I never wanted the magic to stop.” Brilliant.

Ian ‘Lemmy’ Kilmister

1945 -2015

Born to Lose, Lived to Win

Baddest Mother…… of Rock ‘n’ Roll

This is for Nige Baby…

Lemmy was a true hell-raiser and his tales of half a century of hard partying often left interviewers lost for words. Even in his older years he’d hang out in The Rainbow Bar on Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, with a glass of bourbon in one hand and a Marlboro red in the other, wearing his famous cowboy hat and the Iron Cross around his neck. And he sure lived life to the full. So much so, fans were beginning to think he was actually immortal.

He previously admitted he drank a bottle of Jack Daniel’s every day from the age of 30, he took speed for THREE decades, had run ins with the police and was rumoured to have bedded 2,000 women.

Lemmy made the shocking admission about his whisky addiction in the documentary Live Fast Die Old and fans were stunned when he revealed he’d cleaned up his act in 2013 after a health scare.

But he didn’t give up on his unhealthy lifestyle altogether, instead, he cut down on cigarettes and swapped from Jack Daniel’s and coke to vodka and orange – reportedly to help with his diabetes. Although, during an interview his assistant wondered whether swapping from one 40 per cent spirit topped with sugar to another 40 per cent spirit topped with sugar was really going to help.

“I like orange juice better,” Lemmy said. “So, Coca-Cola can f off.”

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Jerry Lee Lewis and wife Shawn Stevens Lewis attend a Pre-GRAMMY Party at the Biltmore Hotel. February 23, 1983| Credit: Ron Galella/Getty Images.

Jerry Lee Lewis and wife Shawn Stevens Lewis attend a Pre-GRAMMY Party at the Biltmore Hotel. February 23, 1983| Credit: Ron Galella/Getty Images.

“The Strange And Mysterious Death of Mrs. Jerry Lee Lewis”

Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935) the American singer-songwriter, musician, and pianist, often known by his nickname, The Killer. He is often viewed as “rock & roll’s first great wild man.

Tragedies have cast a pall over much of The Killer’s life. At age 22, after helping lead the rockabilly revolution with such hits as Great Balls of Fire and Whole Lot of Shakin’ Goin’On, he watched his career tailspin into scandal when he took his 13-year-old cousin Myra for his third wife. In 1962 his 3-year-old son, Steve Allen Lewis, named after the talk-show host, drowned in the family pool. Eleven years later Jerry Lee Lewis Jr., 19, was killed in an auto accident. Lewis’ bouts with drink and drugs came to be as commonly publicized as his marital woes, and in 1980 his estranged fourth wife, Jaren, took him to court, accusing him of threatening her life. While awaiting a final divorce decree, Jaren, 39, also drowned in a swimming accident.

The killer was in his bedroom, behind the door of iron bars, as Sonny Daniels, the first ambulance man, moved down the long hall to the guest bed- room to check the report: “Unconscious party at the Jerry Lee Lewis residence.”

Lottie Jackson, the housekeeper, showed Sonny into a spotless room: Gauzy drapes filtered the noonday light; there was nothing on the tables, no clothes strewn about, no dust; just a body on the bed, turned away slightly toward the wall, with the covers drawn up to the neck. Sonny probed with his big, blunt fingers at a slender wrist: it was cold. “It’s Miz Lewis,” Lottie said. “I came in…I couldn’t wake her up….” Sonny already had the covers back, his thick hand on the woman’s neck where the carotid pulse should be: The neck retained its body warmth, but no pulse. Now he bent his pink moon-face with its sandy fuzz of first beard over her pale lips: no breath. He checked the eyes. “Her eyes were all dilated. That’s an automatic sign that her brain has done died completely.”

Matthew Snyder, the second ambulance man, had barely finished Emergency Medical Technician school. He was twenty, blond, beefy, even younger than Sonny, and just starting with the Hernando, Mississippi, ambulance team. Even rookies knew there wasn’t anything uncommon about a run to Jerry Lee’s to wake up some passed-out person. But Matthew saw there was something uncommonly wrong now, as he caught the look of worry and excitement from Sonny over at the bed. “Go ahead and check her over,” said Sonny, and Matthew restarted the process with the woman’s delicate wrist. He saw, up on her forearm, the row of angry little bruises, like someone had grabbed her hard. He saw the little stain of dried blood on the web of her hand. He shook his head at Sonny: no pulse.

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IMAGE: PETRA NIEMEIER - K & K/REDFERNS / GETTY IMAGES

IMAGE: PETRA NIEMEIER – K & K/REDFERNS / GETTY IMAGES

Hanging out with Hendrix

Jimi Cooking Up A Storm

 34 Montagu Square, in Marylebone, London, is a part of music history. Beatles drummer Ringo Starr leased the ground-floor and basement apartment in the mid-1960s, and Paul McCartney created several Beatles demos there in 1965, including “I’m Looking Through You” from the album Revolver.

Hendrix also lived in the apartment, subletting it from Ringo beginning in December 1966. He lived with his girlfriend, Kathy Etchingham, and also with his manager, Chas Chandler, and his girlfriend, Lotta Null. The monthly rent was £30.

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MIchael Rougier Time and Life Pictures/Getty Images

MIchael Rougier Time and Life Pictures/Getty Images

VOICE OF AMERICA: LIFE WITH JOHNNY CASH Read more »