Nagging

Because nagging

Apparently we are all a bit afraid of telling the better half about poor investment decisions or losing money.

The article comes up with some reasons but they all mis the real reason we are a bit squeamish about fessing up.

When former Oasis front-man Noel Gallagher lost millions of dollars trying to set up his solo music career it took him a whole year to tell his wife.

Most of us don’t have that kind of money to lose or spend but the angst of telling the other half can be just as difficult. Clinical psychologist and senior lecturer at AUT University, Mark Thorpe, says there is no cook-book recipe as to why some people lie or try to hide their spending because it comes down to what money means to that person and what it represents in the relationship. “It’s a very loaded thing.” Thorpe said many people had a strong connection between love and money. But for others it also represented care, security, safety or dependence.

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I knew it! Two new studies prove what we have always known

Another couple to add to the list of totally useless studies.

So, if you have a nagging spouse it can be a bit depressing and it’s harder to get in the mood for something positive…stop the clock, who knew or could have seen that result. Ground breaking.

Being married can make people more prone to depression, a study reveals.

Constant nagging and domestic spats are significant triggers of long-term stress that cannot be outweighed by the positive aspects of wedlock, scientists found.

It can also make husbands and wives far less responsive to positive experiences.

Previous research has shown married people are, in general, happier and healthier than singletons.

But an 11-year study by the University of Wisconsin-Madison poses a question mark over the decades of research linking single life to long-lasting social stress.

The researchers assessed a group of married adults for depression, and gave them questionnaires to rate their stress on a six-point scale.

Nine years later, the questionnaire and depression assessments were repeated.

In year 11, the participants took part in ’emotional response testing’, measuring how quickly they can recover from a negative experience.

The test, commonly used to assess depression, monitors the frowning muscle – or, the corrugator supercilii.

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