National Security Agency

Hide on Key, Labour and spying

The report is in and, contrary to the screaming skull’s assertions, there is not and has not been any mass surveillance of Kiwis.

Rodney Hide examines security, intelligence and Labour’s game-playing?in his Herald on Sunday column:

There’s a reason John Key remains Prime Minister, having outpolled five successive Labour Party leaders: he is smart. And not just smart: very smart.

We can see that in his choosing Sir Michael Cullen along with lawyer Dame Patsy Reddy to review our spy agencies.

Cullen is Labour through and through and his conducting of the review should help depoliticise what has become a vexed issue.

He is also smart and will make it hard for Labour to oppose the review’s findings and recommendations.

Spying is highly politically charged and is a loser for any Government – the usual transparency that ensures accountability would undermine the very purpose of the agencies.

Until recent times there has been multi-party agreement and oversight of the spy agencies, including the Greens being represented on the Intelligence and Security Committee.

The political parties have placed the cause of national security above the seeking of political advantage and the agencies have also worked hard to be transparent with the Parliamentary parties.

The system has worked.

But, politics being politics, the Government-Opposition bipartisanship broke down when the political opportunity presented itself.

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Key’s smart politics forcing Little into a corner over spy agency report

Tracy Watkins discusses the forth-coming spy agency report that is due out.

When John Key and Andrew Little eyeball each other across the table during a closed door session of Parliament’s intelligence and security committee this week, the prime minister will be ready to turn the tables on his opponents.

Key is asking Labour to back him on legislation overhauling the country’s spy agencies, the Government Communications Security Bureau and Security Intelligence Service.

It might have sounded like Key was making the plea for bipartisanship from a position of weakness. Spies and the surveillance agencies have been Key’s Achilles heel after all. But the Labour leader will probably see Key’s plea for unity?for what it is, a game of political brinkmanship. Because refusing to back any law changes lets Key paint Labour into a corner as weak on national security. Given Little’s previous call to back the Government on extending the powers of the SIS to detect Isis supporters, he seems unlikely to fall into that trap.

A lot has changed since the 2014 election campaign, when Key was wrong footed?by?allegations swirling around a bungling GCSB. Back then,?Labour under David Cunliffe?abandoned the usual bipartisanship on?national security issues to rub the Government’s nose in those failures by?opposing?law changes governing the agency. Key was besieged on every front -?even NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden joined the party. ?? Read more »

Former CIA boss blames Paris on the traitor Edward Snowden

Politico Magazine reports:

Michael Morell, the former acting head of the CIA, says the Paris attacks have exposed how freely the Islamic State was able to operate in a chastened environment in which intelligence gathering was partly shut down after Edward Snowden?s exposure of National Security Agency surveillance in 2013. Now, Morell says, the need for greater security is on everyone?s mind?especially since the terrorist group has threatened an attack on the U.S. In his recently published book, The Great War of Our Time: The CIA?s Fight Against Terrorism From Al Qa?ida to ISIS, Morell accuses Snowden of aiding in the rise of the Islamic State. In an interview on Tuesday with Politico Magazine National Editor Michael Hirsh, Morell elaborates on the damage he believes the leaker has done.

Michael Hirsh: How did the Snowden revelations help the Islamic State, and did they somehow lead to the Paris attacks?

Michael Morell: First, ISIS went to school on how we were collecting intelligence on terrorist organizations by using telecommunications technologies. And when they learned that from the Snowden disclosures, they were able to adapt to it and essentially go silent ? And so, part of their rise was understanding what our capabilities were, adjusting to them so we couldn?t see them. No doubt in my mind. And the people who say otherwise are just trying to defend Edward Snowden.

Two?and much more damaging: The Snowden disclosures created this perception that people?s privacy was being put at significant risk. It wasn?t only the Snowden disclosures about [Section] 215 [of the PATRIOT Act, allowing for the mass collection of telephone metadata] that created that, it was the media?s handling of it. The media went to the darkest corner of the room, the CNNs and the FOXes etc. of the world, those people who have a 24/7 news cycle. In those early days, if you were watching CNN, they were saying the NSA is listening to your phone calls. It?s reading your emails. When you call your grandma in Arkansas, the NSA knows. All total bulls–t. They made the public more concerned about the privacy issue than the legitimate facts should have done. And so, the result of that was everything you?ve seen. The constraining of 215. The IT companies building encryption without keys. That is all, at the end of the day, back in Snowden?s lap, in my view.

As far as Paris goes, we don?t know for sure yet how these guys communicate among themselves and how they communicated back to the ISIS leadership in Iraq and Syria, but I?m fairly confident we?re going to learn they used these encrypted communication applications that have commercial encryption and are extremely difficult for companies to break?and which the companies have made the decision not to produce a key for. Even if the government goes to them with a warrant, they can?t give them anything because they don?t have a key. These companies made these decisions about encryption when they were finding it very difficult to sell their products overseas because the Snowden disclosures created the impression that the U.S. government was inside this hardware and software produced by them. They needed to do something to deal with the perception.

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Scumbag protestors shut down first bit of openness and transparency from the GCSB

Far left protesters have been wanting more openness from spy agencies ?and when the head of the GCSB is invited by the Privacy Commissioner to give a speech about what it the GCSB actually does, you know, in the interests of transparency, protestors then move to shut down that transparency?by shouting down the speaker.

The acting head of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) says it is disappointing her planned speech this afternoon was hijacked by protesters as she was going to reveal operational details never previously discussed.

Una Jagose was about to deliver an address to a Privacy Commission technology forum at the National Library in Wellington when two anti-GCSB protesters unfurled a banner in front of the podium and refused to move.

One man from the audience appealed to the two women to allow Ms Jagose to speak, as that was what they were there to hear, but the protesters said they intended to remain for the duration of the speech.

Privacy Commissioner John Edwards then decided to cancel the event.

Afterwards Ms Jagose said the agency had heeded public calls for greater transparency.

“Protests are a legitimate part of the democracy that we live in and I like the democracy that we live in – so is the work that the bureau does, a legitimate part of the democracy we live in,” she said.

“So it was a shame that one stopped the other from going ahead today.”

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Hillary lied, and people died

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton is the presumptive presidential nominee for the Democrat party, but despite the polls she faces a few problems. Not the least of which is the discovery that she lied about her emails and whether or not they stored top secret information.

Government investigators said Friday that they had discovered classified information on the private email account that Hillary Rodham Clinton used while secretary of state, stating unequivocally that those secrets never should have been stored outside of secure government computer systems.

Mrs. Clinton has said for months that she kept no classified information on the private server that she set up in her house so she would not have to carry both a personal phone and a work phone. Her campaign said Friday that any government secrets found on the server had been classified after the fact.

But the inspectors general of the State Department and the nation?s intelligence agencies said the information they found was classified when it was sent and remains so now. Information is considered classified if its disclosure would likely harm national security, and such information can be sent or stored only on computer networks with special safeguards. ?? Read more »

The traitor Snowden proven to be a liar, bad bastards have now got his stolen data

Edward Snowden is a traitor and he may well have blood on his hands.

The BBC reports:

UK intelligence agents have been moved because Russia and China can read files stolen by a US whistleblower, a senior government source has told the BBC.

The Sunday Times is reporting that Russia and China have cracked the encryption of the computer files.

The government source told the BBC the countries “have information” that led to agents being moved but added there was “no evidence” any had been harmed.

Edward Snowden, now in Russia, leaked intelligence data two years ago.

The former CIA contractor left the US in 2013 after leaking details of extensive internet and phone surveillance by American intelligence to the media.

His information made international headlines in June 2013 when the Guardian newspaper reported that the US National Security Agency was collecting the telephone records of tens of millions of Americans.

Mr Snowden is believed to have downloaded 1.7 million secret documents before he left the US.

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Twitter is a friend and enabler of terrorism

I facetiously have labelled the nasties on the left who use Twitter to boycott and bully people terrorists.

Little did I know how accurate I was, now that it has been revealed just how terrorism-friendly Twitter is.

The Daily Mail reports:

Twitter will ?tip off? terror suspects and criminals if the security services ask for information about them, a bombshell report reveals.

The social media giant will keep an investigation secret only if compelled to do so by a court, Britain?s terror watchdog found.

It is one of a string of US tech companies which have decided that ? in the wake of the Edward Snowden leaks ? customer ?privacy? and protecting their ?brand? takes priority.

Twitter said its policy was to ?notify users of requests for their account information, which includes a copy of the request, prior to disclosure unless we are prohibited from doing so?.

The astonishing revelations come in a report by David Anderson QC, warning that MI5, MI6, GCHQ and the police are losing their ability to electronically track terrorists and criminals.

In other developments:

  • MI5 warned that Britain was facing an ?unprecedented? threat from Islamist fanatics trained overseas.
  • A political row broke out over whether judges or the Home Secretary should sign surveillance warrants. It emerged that Theresa May had personally granted approval for 2,345 intrusive spying missions last year.
  • US traitor Snowden was condemned for undermining British national security.

Mr Anderson was asked to carry out the review in the wake of Snowden?s claims that GCHQ was engaging in mass surveillance.

He concluded that security officials were not routinely spying on everybody in the UK, and should retain their powers for the ?bulk collection? of communications data.

But he said that as a result of the furore caused by Snowden?s leaks to the Guardian newspaper, US firms were not as willing to provide vital information to the authorities. This had led to the intelligence agencies fearing a day when they ?lose control?.

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The sanctimony and hypocrisy of the NZ Herald

Quite apart from their propensity to make stuff up at the NZ Herald they also possess weapons grade sanctimony and hypocrisy. They play Dirty Media but pretend they are holier than thou.

They are running a campaign using a tainted journalist and someone who trades in private and personal data to run allegations against the NZ Government for spying.

They are laundering information on behalf of a traitor, Edward Snowden, and assisting Nicky Hager, perhaps New Zealand’s most prolific spy and holder of other people’s data.

They write editorials decrying the situation but their editor was involved in his own spying against a competitor.

In 2009 Currie was sued by a former assistant editor of the Herald on Sunday for unjustified dismissal. Reporter Stephen Cook, who helped Currie launch the tabloid, was sacked in 2008 after two drug squad detectives visited the Herald on Sunday offices looking for him. Cook had reportedly been seen at an address, which was under police surveillance. On the day the case commenced Currie faced further scrutiny when the New Zealand Herald revealed examples of industrial espionage, including allegations he sent a reporter to the rival Sunday Star-Times’ print site to obtain advanced copies in a bid to get stories for his own paper. The allegations were again reported in the Sunday News and Sunday Star-Times branded “unprecedented spying”. ?

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The sanctimony and hypocrisy of the left-wing

The left-wing is all upset over allegations of spying on China…apparently it will put our trade at risk.

They are all agog and writing blog posts and decrying the risk to our trade with China.

Well colour me as unsurprised at their rank hypocrisy.

The left-wing has opposed every free trade deal, including the one with China and marched in?the?streets opposing them.

Their insistence on having the full text of the TPPA released is constant.

They want to spike all free trade deals, they want instead protectionism and no trade. ? Read more »

So what, they’re spying on us

It must now be assumed that David “Tainted” Fisher is a traitor to New Zealand as he runs, in the Herald on Sunday, another story from another traitor, Edward Snowden.

This time it is about how we are supposedly spying on China.

So what…they are sure as hell spying on us.

Our spies and America’s top government hackers cooked up a plan to crack into a data link between Chinese Government buildings in Auckland, new Edward Snowden documents reveal.

The project appeared aimed at tapping data flowing between the Chinese consulate and its passport office in Great South Rd ? and using the link to access China’s computer systems.

The revelation is the most explosive of the information about New Zealand revealed in the Snowden documents ? and has sparked a firm Chinese diplomatic response giving rise to concerns our security relationship with the United States is impacting our trade relationship with China.

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