native advertising

Scout is dead in the water, and guess what they’re doing now?

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Mediaworks gossip “news” site Scout had a rough start. ?Eleven staff members to begin with, and they clocked about 1000 visitors?a day after a few weeks. ?Sometimes less. ?If you look at our numbers, where our worst day of Christmas day clocked us 13,500 or so, you get the scale of the problem over?at Scout.

And now, according to public reports, it’s just one person running the site.

So how do they pay the bills? ? Sell advertising so that 1000 people can see it?

Nope, they had to get a little more inventive: ? Read more »

The Changing Hats of Fran O?Sullivan – NZ Inc. or NZME. ?

fran

So far we have looked at the following in this series:
And so we begin
Telling the Truth about Fran O’Sullivan and Dirty Politics
Dirty Politics and Fran O?Sullivan?s ?Unethical Alliance? With Bloggers
Dirty Media – Who feeds Fran?
Dirty Media ? a nice bit of confusion over names, and just who or what is NZ Inc?


On the 16th September 2014 an Application for Trademark of NZ Inc and New Zealand Inc was made by Fran O?Sullivan.

IPO-NZinc Read more »

OK, perhaps Auckland does have a housing problem.

OK, perhaps Auckland does have a housing problem.

How would you like to rent a block of toilets?

Five Auckland public toilets are up for rent, with a public open day to be held at the dunnies.

The heritage buildings are for tender by Auckland Council which said the opportunities for transformation are endless.

“Similar projects in New Zealand and abroad have seen public toilets transformed into cafes, bars, retail spaces, galleries, salons and more,” said Auckland Council’s general manager property, Ian Wheeler.

“We look forward to seeing a range of ideas.” ? Read more »

Uh oh…there goes the Herald’s new revenue stream

The NZ Herald and Fairfax went all in on native advertising, hoodwinking readers into thinking that paid for articles were news.

But all that is about to come to a crashing halt. Software engineers have worked out how to block native advertising.

For publishers, ad blockers are the elephant in the room:?Everybody sees them, no one talks about them. The common understanding is that the first to speak up will be dead?it will acknowledge that the volume of ads actually delivered can in fact be 30% to 50% smaller than claimed?and invoiced. Publishers fear retaliation from media buying agencies?even though the ad community is quick to forget that it dug its own grave by flooding the web with intolerable amounts of promotional formats.

A week ago, I was in Finland for the Google-sponsored conference Newsgeist. The gathering was setup by?Richard Gingras?and his Google News team, and by Google?s media team in London. Up there, in a? high-tech campus nested in a birch forest outside Helsinki, about 150 internet people from Europe and the United States were setting the? agenda for what is called an?un-conference?as opposed to the usual PowerPoint-saturated format delivered in one-way mode. As expected, one session was devoted to the ad blocking issue. (I can?t quote anyone since discussions took place under the?Chatham House Rule). Read more »

Tit for tat media war erupts in wake of Oborne resignation

When Peter Oborne left The Telegraph and outed their compromised and corrupted newsrom hiding stories a few other media outlets jumped in for the kicking.

But the tables have turned in a tit for tat war that is breaking out over media ethics, with accusations now besetting the Guardian.

The Guardian is facing questions over its relationship with advertisers after allegations that it changed a news article amid concerns about offending Apple.

The media organisation has criticised The Telegraph for failing to observe the “Chinese wall” between advertising and editorial coverage, a claim The Telegraph strongly denies.

However, The Telegraph can disclose that in July last year Apple bought wraparound advertising on The Guardian’s website and stipulated that the advertising should not be placed next to negative news.

A Guardian insider said that the headline of an article about Iraq on The Guardian’s website was changed amid concerns about offending Apple, and the article was later removed from the home page entirely.

The insider said: “If editorial staff knew what was happening here they would be horrified.”The Guardian declined to comment on the specific allegation, but said: “It is never the case that editorial content is changed to meet stipulations made by an advertiser. ? Read more »

The ‘unassisted suicide’ of old media

Andrew Sullivan ceases blogging today, and one of his final posts is a discussion of modern media developments by old media companies.

CBC interviewed him about native advertising:

Sullivan?s case against native advertisement is powerful and succinct. ?It is advertising that is portraying itself as journalism, simple as that,? he told me recently. ?It is an act of deception of the readers and consumers of media who believe they?re reading the work of an independent journalist.?

Advertisers, he says, want to buy the integrity built up over decades by journalists and which, in the past, was kept at arm?s length. Now they will happily pay to imitate it: ?The whole goal is you not being able to tell the difference.? Sullivan?s argument is so doctrinaire, so principled, that it makes bourgeois practitioners of the craft, like me, squirm.

Read more »

A new low with Herald’s native advertising

The NZ Herald has jumped donkey deep into native advertising as a way to shore up their flagging revenues.

For those who don’t know native advertising is advertising that is disguised as news.

The latest effort from the NZ Herald sets a new low….they are using the war records of dead heroes to sell the ASB Bank and Auckland Council.

They call it “content partnership” but I’ll lay dollars to a knob of goat poo that the partnership works like this. ASB Bank and Auckland Council pay NZ Herald, NZ Herald takes some information and gets a journalist to write it up, and the NZ Herald publishes it as news….the only winners here are the NZ Herald…they score revenue.

native advertising

The disclaimer is tacked onto the bottom of the article. ? Read more »

It’s Christmas, time to pimp the poor

It’s Christmas time and so we will see a constant stream of bludgers being pimped out to readers of the mainstream news outlets.

They will tell us how hard done by they all are and the reporters and papers will print their stories without a hint of irony or even bare research.

As is usual the Herald uses the same useful idiot to run their stories.

Simon Collins seems unable to realise his lack of perspective.

Hundreds of families from as far away as Hamilton are queuing at the Auckland City Mission for help to put food on the table this Christmas.

City Missioner Diane Robertson said the queue started at 1am on Monday after word got out on social media that Work and Income staff would be at the mission’s Hobson St offices from this week to process applications for emergency help.

The mission gave out 125 food parcels on Monday, compared with 39 on the first day a similar pre-Christmas Work and Income service opened last year.

It closed when the queue reached 200 families on Tuesday, up from 160 on the second day last year, and expected to feed a further 200 families yesterday.

Ms Robertson said the mission did not advertise the service, but word got out through local Work and Income offices and spread through word of mouth and social media.

Bludgers will be bludgers, if you are giving stuff away for free of course you will inundated…but hey it makes a great story to pimp out…and City Mission does this every year.

But let’s look at these so called poor.

Vanisa Samuel, 34, from Papatoetoe, saw it on a Facebook site called South Side Freebies.

Bludgers telling other bludgers where to find free stuff…on Facebook no less. ? Read more »

Herald busted over native advertising

Have you read The NZ Herald and their 12 questions series?

What about the constant featuring of their Brand insights and the strange articles about people attending the University of Auckland MBA course?

Well wonder no more.

It is actually undisclosed paid advertising masquerading as journalism and boy are they happy about the results.

After my posts of yesterday this turned up on the tipline.

To: [REDACTED]
Subject: UABS and NZ Herald Partnership

Colleagues

As many of you will be aware, the Business School has been involved in running a marketing partnership with the New Zealand Herald over the past few months which we drove through the Graduate School of Management.? The New Zealand Herald took our programme into their Brand Insights initiative ?around 2 months ago and the analytics have without doubt proven the campaign to be a success. The partnership delivered a mix of contributed articles from academics, a weekly blog from one of our current MBA students Sarah Stuart (well known NZ journalist, ex Deputy Editor of the Herald on Sunday and Editor of Woman?s weekly as well as the face of the Herald?s 12 questions series) and a video series using Sarah?s well known 12 questions format. We were also able to run advertising ?for specific events for the MBA programme or promote Executive Education courses as part of the campaign page. The partnership ran over 6 months (we are finalising our last two videos at this time featuring Professor Kaj Storbacka and Dr Lester Levy and our final 3 contributed articles will run by mid Nov). Some highlights from the analytics of our campaign without going into pages of detail or graph overload show that the content was engaging, on average the blogs achieved excellent readership (unique views on some blogs hit well over 5,000 and on the aggregator over half a million impressions).? Average time spent reading the blogs was 3 minutes, similar time was spent on the videos and on the contributed articles.? When the content aggregator was used, naturally the blogs and articles were more prominent on the site.

The link below will take you to our page where you can view some of Sarah?s blogs and our academic staff contributed articles:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/universityofauckland/news/headlines.cfm?c_id=1503679

And this link will take you to an example of one of the videos:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/video.cfm?c_id=1503079&gal_cid=1503079&gallery_id=144775

Through analysis we were able to determine that the campaign drove traffic to the GSM website directly from the NZ Herald and those that visited the site were looking at between 2 to 6 pages after landing, suggesting a genuine interest in the programme, the requirements etc.? Read more »

Does John Drinnan actually read what he writes?

John Drinnan is a fool.

His latest column mentions the decision b the Press Council to open up membership finally to online media.

This is interesting because in current proceedings before the Human Rights Review Tribunal I have?told I can’t be a journalist because i’m not a member of a voluntary regime like the Press Council, but the lawyer ignored the problem that until last week I couldn’t possibly join because their constitution wouldn’t allow it.

I also had to battle that premise int eh High Court, but fortunately Justice Asher saw through that attempt, not so you would know it from the perspective of the Human Rights Commission.

The idea of expanding the Press Council’s reach has been around for years and was given a boost after the Law Commission suggested digital media should join a combined media standards organisation, in return for receiving legal protections available to journalists. Then Justice Minister Judith Collins – a close friend of Slater – quashed that plan.

However the Press Council has since gone ahead with a scheme to represent digital media and blogs under its own steam, and that was unveiled this week.

But the ethics of bloggers and the media in general have come under deep scrutiny since Dirty Politics was published. Neville said it was clear in Press Council rules that publishers could not be paid for editorial.

“There is a grey area now with so-called native advertising, which is meant to be quality journalism which stacks up on its journalistic merits, even though it is sympathetic to one party.”

There were questions about whether the Press Council should have jurisdiction over native content, or if that should be covered by the Advertising Standards Authority.

Dirty Politics author Nicky Hager said the Press Council was getting into complex waters judging digital media on the basis of individuals rather than articles, and deciding whether they were journalism or not.

“My fear would be what could happen is that unscrupulous blogs could be given credibility but not end up with any accountability.

“Sometimes people are publishing public relations, and sometimes journalism,” he said.

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