NZ on Screen

We paid for it, we own it

Olivia Wannan at Stuff reports

We’ve funded the shows, but what rights do we have to watch them online?

Government funding agency NZ On Air is arguing that partially and fully funded television content should be permanently and freely available on the web.

But the idea is being opposed by producers and broadcasters, whose on-demand streaming of shows is typically taken down a few weeks after their broadcast dates.

With television viewer numbers dropping, a large number of Kiwis are missing the latest taxpayer-funded shows, a report from NZ On Air says.

Even the most popular programmes are seen by a just fraction of the total available audience. The top-rating New Zealand’s Got Talent, for instance, is being watched by just under a quarter of the population.

But with online audiences growing, the agency is proposing a permanent online home such as NZ On Screen, its own television and film-content website, for all funded television.

“Audiences expect to be able to access content when and where they want,” the report says.

I’m with NZ On Air with this one.  Move with the times.  We paid for it, we want to see it.  And not just when broadcasters put it on air.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Banned from TV!

NZ On Screen just released these 7 clips:

This bad-arse set features seven titles that were withheld from the TV spotlight when they were first made. Moral offenders include Timberjack’s town belt satanists (with nude damsel), Hell’s Angels bikers, a ‘no nukes’ Goon Spike Milligan, and unmarried singles. Also shown is The Neville Purvis Family Show, which did manage to screen, but after an infamous use of the ‘F’ word (sadly, lost) Neville Purvis was banned from NZ TV. More recent BSA baiters include the meat-is-murder music video AFFCO, and Headlights’ drunk babes at the milk bar.

To see the other ones, visit NZ On Screen.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Go on, have a laugh

NZ on Screen have placed a nice range of home grown comedy on-line for us all to go all watery-eyed about.  Some of it is cutting political satire (especially back then) the likes of which we haven’t seen since the ’90s.  Somehow lampooning our politicians on TV is no longer the done thing.   And more is the pity.

Unfortunately NZ on Screen doesn’t allow embedding videos, so for a taste of ’70 political satire, check this out.  You’ll be treated to a wholesome sex education lesson, just in case you need a refresher.  (Hint:  Make sure the chair has cooled down)

Or just fill your boots.

fffjjyy

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.