NZME

Is clickbait merchant Fairfax rooted?

Is clickbait merchant Fairfax rooted?

Credit Suisse seems to think so:

A Credit Suisse analyst has forecast Australian publisher Fairfax Media will exit New Zealand if it fails to get approval to merge its New Zealand business with rival publishing firm NZME.

Fraser McLeish said in a research note that he expected Fairfax to leave New Zealand “one way or another”.

The Commerce Commission is expected to decide by March 15 whether it will let Fairfax NZ and NZME join forces in a deal that would see Fairfax Media end up with about a 41 per cent stake in the combined NZX-listed company.

McLeish said despite a draft decision from the competition watchdog which suggested the merger would be blocked, there was a still a chance it would be allowed.

But if the deal was blocked, Credit Suisse expected Fairfax would look at other options.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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A dodgy liquidator discusses StuffMe merger

Damien Grant discusses the proposed StuffMe merger:

It is deeply satisfying to see the heads of Fairfax and NZME grovel before the inquisitors of the Commerce Commission in a forlorn attempt to stave off the day they will need to all get real jobs. For the past two decades we have had to watch as journalism has been debased from an ancient and noble craft to a festering swamp of leftists who confuse advocacy with reporting.

On the mezzanine floor of the insolvency firm where I work sits a century’s worth of the Truth, once a proud and respected newspaper, which chased the modern equivalent of clickbait by dropping real reporting for page three girls and pandering to whims of the sex industry.

Its liquidation is a harbinger of the demise of the newspaper as we know it and in an attempt to stave off their own oblivion and searching for a business model that can sustain some semblance of news Fairfax and NZME want to do a deal.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

NZME admits their business model is failing

Adhub is a business unit of NZME. They run ads across their network and are utterly ineffective from personal experience.

Back in 2014 they approached me to do my ads. They, like everyone in the industry promised me the earth. I certainly had the traffic that advertisers would want.

After 6 months however, I had to give them the flick. They paid me much less than Google ads ever have.

It turned out however that the lack of bookings was politically motivated and they had sneakily removed me from their pitch documents and website, at the same time adding The Standard, The Daily blog and Scoop Media. They tried to explain it away blaming the agencies for the lack of bookings.

So colour me surprised when I received this email via the tipline begging for confidentiality while they try and save the business. Given their lack of honesty towards me in the past, I can’t really see myself honouring their request:   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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ComCom favours rejecting Fairfax/NZME merger #StuffMe

stuffme

The ComCom has issued a draft determination rejecting the bid by Fairfax and NZME for a merger of the two companies.

NBR reports:

The Commerce Commission says a proposed merger of New Zealand’s two biggest media companies will substantially lessen competition and lead to reduced editorial quality.

In  draft decision published this morning, the regulator said its preliminary view was to decline to authorise the merger.

The two companies had sought clearance or authorisation to combine their businesses in New Zealand, which include the two biggest news websites stuff.co.nz and nzherald.co.nz.

NZME owns eight daily and two weekly newspapers, 24 community publications, six magazine titles, ten radio stations and 38 websites.

Fairfax operates the largest print media network in New Zealand, featuring nine daily and three weekly newspapers, 61 community publications, ten magazine titles and six websites.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Why NZME make me sick

hypocrites

Today the NZ Herald, owned by NZME has splashed a story about a radio host from the competing Mediaworks stable all over their website…it is also pushed out via their gossip site Spy.

That radio host is clearly suffering a major depressive episode, and as a fellow sufferer of depression, I know precisely what she is going through. The last thing she needs is the gutless wankers at the NZ Herald prying into her private life.

But their actions stand in stark contrast to the rather glowing eulogies they are handing out right now to one of their own.

So…here’s the thing.

The guy who was found in a pool of piss, shit and vomit in a hotel in Cambodia after a long bender on opiates and meth apparently deserves respect and care. Everything is glossed over. They go on about how he was a caring Dad and husband…blah, blah, blah.

But then they go and kick the shit out of someone clearly suffering a massive depressive episode, all of a sudden their pretense of care and love is out the window in the name of clickbait headlines and attacking the opposition media organisation.

They should get their own house in order. They need to realise that their staff aren’t pure…from the top down.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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NZ Herald’s owner NZME, have had a server compromised

And the ones to “out them” are Spark.   No really.

Hi,

Thanks for playing the Spark Arcade game recently. It’s a promotion we set up with our partner NZME. Unfortunately, we’ve been advised that there has been a security breach on a server used by NZME, hosting the Spark Arcade website.

This means some information about you (your name, email address and mobile number, whether you won a Spark Arcade prize or not, and if you did, what that prize was) was vulnerable to access by a third-party.

A security breach.  That’s interesting.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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NZ Herald floats, then sinks

The NZ Herald parent company had a dreadful start to their much-vaunted float…dropping 20%, and aren’t Mediaworks gleeful about it all.

Newly listed media company NZME debuted on the New Zealand stock market today with its shares closing at 80 cents.

Shares were initially offered at NZ$1 as a reference point because it is a new company listing. It is now up to the market to determine what the company is worth. Shares initially traded around 85c but then closed down. At 80c a share, NZME would be valued at NZ$156.8 million.

NZME owns the NZ Herald newspaper, various regional titles, the GrabOne daily deals website and the Radio Network.

The NZ listing comes after its Australian owners APN News & Media decided to demerge its Kiwi business NZME so it could potentially merge with Fairfax NZ.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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APN to divest of NZME; a matter of cashing up before it keels over

This is what happens when the accountant has been put in charge and you’ve lost the trust and confidence of your customers.

NZME chief executive Michael Boggs will spend the next 10 days meeting and greeting current and potential investors after APN News & Media shareholders overwhelmingly backed plans to carve out the New Zealand unit.

The Auckland-based publisher and radio network operator will operate as a standalone listed company after the plan to demerge NZME got 99.98 percent backing at Thursday’s special meeting in Sydney.

The transaction will see a one-for-seven share consolidation in the Australian company, then a distribution of NZME shares to those investors on a one-for-one basis. The deal then frees up APN to focus on Australian radio and outside advertising business, while NZME can pursue its merger with rival Fairfax New Zealand.

Boggs told BusinessDesk he’s about to hit the road to meet current and potential shareholders in Auckland, Wellington, Sydney and Melbourne over the next seven to 10 days to engage and get feedback from shareholders on their views of NZME and where they think the media group should be heading.

“We now can control our own decision making around capital investment and funding,” Boggs said.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Former owner of the Herald has strong words about latest developments

Michael Horton is the former owner of the NZ Herald, when it had a reputation as a newspaper of record and credibility as a prestigious media organisation.

Sadly, those times have passed and now it is a shadow of its former self.

He has written on Facebook, in rather strong terms for him, about the proposed merger and new corporate structure.

With the lack of critical financial reporting now endemic in the media, perhaps one could reflect on a few oddities of the imminent float of NZME on the New Zealand Stock Exchange. For the NZX not to insist on a prospectus for this new vehicle aimed at attracting fresh capital from New Zealanders would be one’s first misgiving. This means no audited accounts and no forecasts for which directors should be legally liable ( viz Feltex).

Punters may feel they can take a chance with their own money but with other people’s money they might like to think about a board some of whose directors transferring to the NZME board received a massive lift in fees last year despite another statutory loss and after years of not paying dividend and despite the company about to halve itself in size.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Will local news media become like boutique breweries?

In 2012 I was invited to speak at the New Zealand Community Newspapers Association awards dinner.

I made my speech about how the future of publishing news was in their hands and they didn’t even know it.

As Fairfax and APN (then, NZME. now) got bigger they had ignored the local news. They concentrated more and more on Wellington, Auckland and Christchurch.

Those papers that did the basics well locally were actually able to grow if they just thought about it and got even more parochial. Even in Auckland there were opportunities, like the Howick and Pakuranaga Times…unfortunately they were at the time in the thrall of a couple of wide boys talking the big game in digital without even bothering to understand their audience or what they were even doing.

Karl du Fresne has a blog post about just those sorts of sentiments, that “boutique” is profitable and lucrative and perhaps the way of the future for local news.

It’s rare these days to hear about any development in the news media that’s worth celebrating, but the announcement that the Wairarapa Times-Age is reverting to local ownership is a tonic.

After 12 years in what is now the NZME (previously known as APN) stable, the Masterton-based Monday-Friday paper is being bought by its general manager, Andrew Denholm. My guess is that other local money is involved, although I have no inside knowledge.

The news is encouraging for several reasons. For a start, it represents a tiny reversal of a trend that has greatly diminished the relevance of local papers.

The process of agglomeration by which provincial papers such as the Times-Age were gobbled up in the late 20th century by the two big industry players of the time, INL and Wilson and Horton, was once overwhelmingly positive for the industry.

It gave small, previously family-owned papers access to capital with which to invest in vital new technology. It brought them into a nationwide career structure that lifted professional standards and it also meant that small papers were less likely to be captive to local parochial interests.

That all worked well while the two big companies remained in New Zealand hands. The turning point came when the Australian outfits Fairfax (which acquired INL) and APN (which bought Wilson and Horton) moved in.

Australian ownership has not been good for the New Zealand print media. Their disregard for the New Zealand way of doing things was never more obvious than when they dismantled the New Zealand Press Association, thus ending a system of news sharing that had lasted more than a century and ensured that newspaper readers in Whangarei and Gisborne knew about things of importance that were happening in Invercargill and Greymouth.

Sharing wasn’t the Australian way, so it was scrapped.

[…]   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.