oil drilling

Matt McCarten’s own Yeah/Nah moment

Matt McCarten appears to be changing his mind to suit his latest rant about oil drilling. He has?had his very own Yeah/Nah moment.

In today’s Herald on Sunday opinion piece:

“Half of all New Zealand jobs and 70 per cent of our export revenue are directly linked to our clean, green reputation. Deep-sea oil drilling interests claim our Government could receive $300 million from it. That’s $75 per New Zealander. We trade away our best marketing brand for that?”? Read more »

The Huddle

newstalkzb

I was on the Huddle last night with Larry Williams and Josie Pagani

We covered ?the Ewan MacDonald parole denial. Sounds like a good decision. I?m sure had he not been tried for the murder of his brother-in-law he might have had a chance of getting out this early into his sentence. The most bizarre part of this though was his lawyer after the decision was released, he made this speech to the media (while almost in tears) asking for the privacy of McDonald?s children to be respected and to just report on the day?s proceedings and not do anything else. Doesn?t sound like he has a great lawyer ? I mean using the Brown Defence is a bit demeaning.

Then we?ve got?some odd group from Christchurch taking the South Taranaki district council to court over putting fluoride in the water?as a test case. They say it?s unlawful for the council to do this, and that the legislation allowing them to is outdated and based on old bad science. They are an outfit from Christchurch obviously with too much time on their hands trying to stop fluoridation all around the country. I?d say they need to find something better to do. But hey, who knows what will happen in the outcome. ? Read more »

The Huddle at 1740

newstalkzb

I am on the Huddle tonight with Larry Williams and Josie Pagani

So tonight we?ve got the Ewan MacDonald parole denial. Sounds like a good decision. I?m sure had he not been tried for the murder of his brother-in-law he might have had a chance of getting out this early into his sentence. The most bizarre part of this though was his lawyer after the decision was released, he made this speech to the media (while almost in tears) asking for the privacy of McDonald?s children to be respected and to just report on the day?s proceedings and not do anything else. Doesn?t sound like he has a great lawyer ? I mean using the Brown Defence is a bit demeaning.? Read more »

EU redtape and green whingers threaten fracking in Europe

At least the Green European MPs are honest.

They object to fracking because it undermines the already pretty crappy economic case for bird slaughtering windmills by making power cheaper.

The European Union has been accused of killing off the prospect of cheap energy from shale gas by trying to impose with expensive and ?reckless? regulation of fracking.

The European Parliament on Wednesday voted for new EU laws requiring that exploration for potential deposits of shale gas to face the same environmental regulation as a full-scale oil drilling.

Struan Stevenson, a Conservative MEP who sits on the European Parliament’s environment committee, warned that the plan could strangle the nascent fracking industry in Britain. ? Read more »

What the Louisiana sinkhole could have been…

 

Forget fracking – this is the kind of oil drilling you should watch out for.

Greenpeace finances same as the Unions

The greenies are running out of green.

Despite a series of high-profile and acidic campaigns against the likes of Nestle, Cadbury, Fonterra, Sealord, Cottonsoft and its parent APP, and the most satanic of them all, Big Oil, Greenpeace hasn?t generated enough donations from the devout membership to even get close to breaking even. It emerged in mid-July that Greenpeace New Zealand posted a 69% drop in full-year profit in 2011, down nearly $550,000 on the year before.

It?s not just a lack of donor goodness that?s to blame. The lowly New Zealand branch of the Greenpeace empire was required to make a bigger payout to its global parent in 2011, and gave Greenpeace International $1.9 million, around $450,000 more than in 2010.

I bet that hurt. After all, they?ve been trying so hard. Under the careful stewardship of ?Bunny-boiler? McDiarmid, the Kiwi team laboured exhaustively last year to bring the nation?s attention to a plague of alleged environmental wrongdoing by some of the best-known Kiwi brands. They used their tried-and-true tactics ? a video of a dying tiger or homeless orangutan never goes amiss ? to cut straight to the moral core of the nation and generate cashflow. The greenies know better than anyone what a pack of soft touches we are ? per capita, New Zealanders and Australians give more to charity than any other nations. We?ve also been a reliable source of income for Greenpeace specifically.

So, the money collected here is flying offshore. How is it being used? Greenpeace?s 2010 annual report devotes one of its 32 pages to the subject, and notes that funds raised in the preceding year meant it ?could commit significant resources to our fight against dangerous Arctic oil drilling, get companies to stop buying palm oil from rainforest destruction, and challenge bluefin tuna fishing in the Mediterranean, for example.? It also mentioned keeping up pressure on companies to eliminate toxic chemicals and strengthening its campaign for sustainable agriculture.

If that was enough detail for the faithful, no skin off my nose. They have all the transparency of the Meatworkers Union it appears.

But donations are drying up, so let?s ponder why. Perhaps Kiwi givers are a bit tired of seeing their cash disappear into some distant consolidated fund in Europe. Surely some were concerned about Greenpeace being prevented by the High Court from continuing to register as a charity due to its political activities. Others might have noticed that even before the black hole of 2011, the Asia Pacific wing had suffered three consecutive years of losses totalling more than $3 million.

Still others might have doubted that Greenpeace?s complaints stacked up. Companies like Fonterra and Nestle have giant sustainability programmes, certifications and endless shots of smiling farmers plastered all over their websites.

APP has a whole site dedicated to the matter, Rainforest Realities, where it announced recently that in an industry first, three of its Indonesian mills have secured SVLK certification, making them the first pulp and paper mills in the country to achieve certification under the new Wood Legality Verification System. Consumers are left to decide whose word they trust more, and the evidence suggests it?s not Greenpeace.

After its embarrassing numbers were reported, in rare defensive mode Greenpeace posted a ?correction statement? online to address what it called ?some misunderstanding? by the media ?in understanding the financial position of the organisation.?

I?m no accountant, but I?m guessing that position is somewhat fucked. Too busy boiling saving bunnies to bother balancing the books, Ms McDiarmid?

When is a moratorium not a moratorium? Ctd

The other day I blogged about the?inconsistency?of Phil Goff’s moratorium call, today?unsurprisingly, the mainstream has picked up the?inconsistency?and?noticed?Phil Goff’s weaselly excuses:

Labour leader Phil Goff has pulled a U-turn after announcing his party would halt deep sea drilling, saying he ?didn?t use the word moratorium?.

Appearing on Kiwi FM yesterday Mr Goff said he was ?probably splitting hairs? when he said Labour would stop oil drilling until safeguards were in place, but that this was not a moratorium.

?I didn?t use the word moratorium on TV3 you might have noticed,? he said.

?Unless you can provide absolute guarantees about safety and contingency plans for cleanup we?re not going to take the chance.?

As the oil from the stricken ship Rena quickly turned into an election issue last week, Mr Goff announced Labour would not immediately go ahead with deep sea drilling.

?There shouldn?t be deep sea drilling until we know there are safeguards in place that can absolutely be relied upon,? he said last Thursday.

?I?m not confident that there is.?

This was widely reported in the media as a moratorium on deep sea drilling.

Website www.dictionary.com defines a moratorium as ?a suspension of activity? or ?an authorised period of delay or waiting?.

?Well a moratorium says that we?re going to stop it for a period of time, I?m saying it in a slightly different way,? Mr Goff said on Kiwi FM.

Weasel words Goff.