Ornithology

Things must be getting desperate in Hutt South, Mallard is still musing about Moas

You have to give Trevor Mallard some credit…when he latches onto a cunning stunt he really gives it his all.

Last election he wasted 6 months training his heart out to beat a fat lazy blogger in race around the streets of East Auckland, in a sport that consumes his every waking moment in between stints at his part time job in parliament as an MP.

He lacked the courage to have a crack at a sport of my choosing…boxing or Sporting Clays…he took the easy win and then shut up.

This time his brilliant campaign strategy is to repeatedly and vociferously advocate for the resurrection of a long dead bird…and I’m not talking about his political career here…rather he wants to investigate in saving and extinct bird, the moa.

Trevor Mallard just can’t let go of his fascination with resurrecting the moa.

Yesterday Inglewood, a town long associated with the extinct flightless bird, came to the attention of the Labour MP.

He was in Taranaki yesterday to talk about sport and recreation, but was fascinated to learn Inglewood was briefly known as Moatown in the mid-1870s. ? Read more »

Claire Trevett on Mallard’s moa

Claire Trevett has a lash at Trevor Mallard’s?moa?malarkey:

Taika Waititi recently said of his movie?What We Do in the Shadows?that everybody needs a bit of silly in their lives. Labour’s Trevor Mallard immediately took his advice.

He gave a speech to the Wainiuomata Business Development breakfast. It began well. A lifelong Wainuiomartian, Mr Mallard spoke of his links to the valley, over the hill from the Hutt Valley. He made a good joke about being in the under 7s cricket team, which was all out for six runs against arch rivals Riverside. “We took our name too literally.”

He spoke of the joys of the valley’s microclimate, its community spirit, its need to attract more people and the low property prices, getting in a jab at the value to loan requirements making it harder for young families in the area to buy first homes “as a side effect of targeting Auckland house prices”.

So far, so on message. Then he revealed he’d been spending quite a bit of time on Google and he had discovered the solution to Wainuiomata’s problem.

He had discovered the science of de-extinction. He wanted the moa back in the bush around Wainuiomata.

Mallard’s enthusiasm was such that he took a journey around the Press Gallery to deliver the speech in person, along with photos of himself cuddling a kiwi, and illustrations of the Spanish bucardo ibex and the gastric-brooding frog in Australia.

Attempts had already been made to bring these two species back from the dead, although one did die again rather swiftly and the other never resulted in viable foetuses.

Read more »

Penguins doing fine despite Global Warming

Global warming was supposed to see the end of penguins amongst other things.

In 2009 the following prediction was made in Australia:

MARK COLVIN: Scientists monitoring Australia?s most famous population of Little Penguins have had a scare, after some chicks died of starvation because their parents had to go farther afield than usual to find food.

Phillip Island?s nightly parade of the penguins is a major tourist attraction.

A biologist who works with the colony says it?s a problem which could become more common as climate change takes hold.

Four years on you’d expect that the poor wee things would be in dire straights. Turns out no.

The little penguins of Phillip Island are experiencing a baby boom.

Last summer?s breeding season was the best in a generation, a dramatic turnaround from the 1990s when either foxes were snatching the flightless birds or they were starving to death.

Research manager of the Phillip Island Nature Parks Dr Peter Dann says the rise in population is ?about food?.

?These chicks are fatter, they?ve grown faster, the parents have brought back more food. The parents have been heavier than normal right through the breading seasons,? he said.

Dr Dann says it is a far cry from the 1990s, when food was scarce.

?It was even worse in 1995, when the main food they were eating during that breeding time was pilchard, and the pilchard had a huge die-off right across southern Australia to New Zealand,? he said.

?A lot of birds were actually dying of starvation and they bred very late.

?One of the curious things about all this is that when Australia?s warmer, particularly in Autumn, penguins start breeding earlier in the following Spring and they breed much better than when Bass Strait?s cooler in Autumn.?

Once again the alarmist media, complicit scientists and gullible fools are wrong.

You couldn’t make this up

Honestly…did this merit jail? Free range pigs, egg chucking and jail time:

A man who threw an ostrich egg at his wife because her pet pig damaged his tools has been sent to jail.

Phillip Marau Glanville Russell, 47, lost his temper when he discovered the pig had caused $2500 of damage to his saw.

Russell was sentenced to six months’ jail when he appeared in Hastings District Court yesterday, after earlier pleading guilty to charges including assault using an ostrich egg as a weapon.

He picked an argument with his wife of 20 years when she came home to their rural Waipawa property with their 9-year-old in early July.

He swore at her before spitting at her four or five times. He then grabbed a large ostrich egg from the kitchen table and threw it at her with force. The heavy egg hit her in the chest, causing bruising.

His lawyer, Antony Willis, said Russell had asked his wife repeatedly to keep the pig under control because it had damaged their house, their neighbour’s house and council property. But his wife insisted it should be given free range.

The good news on Climate Change continues


Far from being the end of life as we know it, more evidence continues to surface that suggests that Climate Change, specifically the warming kind is actually good…especially for albatross:

Climate Change may have actively helped boost the survival chances of endangered albatrosses, scientists believe.

…Experts at the Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chiz? in in Villiers en Bois, France, noticed that over that time the length of time of foraging expeditions has fallen from 13 to 10 days and the birds weigh an average of more than 2lb more.

Over the past 30 years westerly winds in the area have become faster and moved further south.

The researchers, led by Dr Henri Weimerskirch said tat the boost in the bird?s size was “one of the most unexpected changes we observed over the past 20 years”.

The study concluded: ?Wandering albatrosses appear so far to have benefited from wind changes occurring in the Southern Ocean, with higher speeds allowing for more rapid travel.

“In wandering albatrosses the probability of prey encounter and capture is related to the daily distances individuals are able to cover.”

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