Pearl Harbor

Guest Post – The USA remembers the ANZACs (do we honour them back?)

USS Arizona Memorial Photo/ Alwyn Poole

USS Arizona Memorial Photo/ Alwyn Poole

By Alwyn Poole

Each year approximately 1,600,000 people visit the Pearl Harbour Memorial sites on Oahu and many New Zealanders are among them.

Last week Karen Poole and I has the privilege of spending a day between the:

You can think that you are prepared and that you have thought these things through before and have organised your intellectual and emotional response. Nothing was further from the truth and in the days since my thoughts have been quick to return to what was there – seen, heard, experienced. A lot of it is reflecting on this event with ANZAC Day so close.

I can add nothing to what the history of the event tells us but a summery is appropriate here (without hope of doing it justice). World War Two had been raging and Japan had been active militarily since July 7 1937. The USA had, by and large, stayed out of the war but was massively concerned about Japanese intentions and actions in the Pacific and had moved a significant fleet to Pearl Harbour. At 6am on December 7th 1941 Japan launched waves of fighter, torpedo and bomber aircraft in a surprise attack from undetected aircraft carriers that had sailed from Japan. They attacked airfields and the fleet at Pearl Harbour. ?? Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Example of Hawaii Overprint Banknotes. National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

Example of Hawaii Overprint Banknotes.
National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

When the US Burned All of Its Money in Hawaii

?At the start of the Pacific War, there was the very real danger of the Japanese invading Hawaii. The possibility of the enemy getting their hands on $200 million circulating in the islands worried authorities. Their extreme solution? Burn all of it.

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A day of infamy – Pearl Harbour Dec 7, 1941

On this day in 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbour and as a result dragged the United States into a global war.

The Huffington Post has a photo essay of that day.

It was a?sunny, mostly clear Sunday?in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, when the unexpected hum of planes cut through the warm Hawaiian air. In a period of just two hours, more 353 Japanese aircraft laid siege to the U.S. naval base, sinking 18 ships and destroying nearly 200 aircraft in a sneak attack that killed more than 2,400 Americans and wounded over 1,000 more.

In this U.S. Navy file photo, a small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crew member from the water after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. Two men can be seen on the superstructure, upper center. The mast of the USS Tennessee is beyond the burning West Virginia. On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese Imperial Navy navigator Takeshi Maeda guided his Kate bomber to Pearl Harbor and fired a torpedo that helped sink the USS West Virginia. President Barack Obama on Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 issued a proclamation declaring Dec. 7 a day of remembrance in honor of the 2,400 Americans who died at Pearl Harbor. He urged federal agencies, organizations and others to fly their flags at half-staff. (AP Photo, File)

In this U.S. Navy file photo, a small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crew member from the water after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. Two men can be seen on the superstructure, upper center. The mast of the USS Tennessee is beyond the burning West Virginia. On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese Imperial Navy navigator Takeshi Maeda guided his Kate bomber to Pearl Harbor and fired a torpedo that helped sink the USS West Virginia. President Barack Obama on Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 issued a proclamation declaring Dec. 7 a day of remembrance in honor of the 2,400 Americans who died at Pearl Harbor. He urged federal agencies, organizations and others to fly their flags at half-staff. (AP Photo, File)

 

Thaw in US relations

This will unhinge the lefty media and other apologists who have had 30 odd years of hating America…but it looks like we are back on good terms militarily with the USA.

About the only thing that could make this even better would be a US Marines base in Northland somewhere.

In an amiable press conference at the Pentagon the New Zealand Defence Minister, Jonathan Coleman, handed his American counterpart, Chuck Hagel, an All Blacks jersey and a three-decade military chill between the two nations appeared to be consigned to history.

US secretary of defence told reporters, “Today, I authorised a New Zealand navy ship to dock at Pearl Harbor… This will be the first time a New Zealand navy ship will have visited Pearl Harbor in more than 30 years.” ? Read more »

Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

? Stuff.co.nz

The media tried to beat up the berthing of NZ ships at the commercial docks of Honolulu rather than out in the sticks at Pearl Harbour. I bet the sailors are pretty grateful that they don;t have to shell out for expensive cab fares to and from Pearl Harbour:

A ban on New Zealand ships berthing in the big American base at Pearl Harbour has turned into a boon for Kiwi sailors and the nightclubs in downtown Honolulu.

The frigate HMNZS Te Kaha and tanker HMNZS Endeavour are taking part in Rimpac, the world’s biggest military operation, but while old enemies Japan and Russia are allowed into Pearl Harbour, the New Zealand ships have been sent to Aloha Tower – deep in the commercial heart of Honolulu.

They are happily close to Hooters and a place called Bikini Cantina. The exile to Honolulu is in return for New Zealand’s ban on nuclear warships.

The?Honolulu Star-Advertiser?in a story this weekend, and reprinted in the forces paper Stars and Stripes, notes that Nikol DeWoody, a bartender for Bikini Cantina received nine marriage proposals – all from New Zealand navy sailors, all on the same night.

“When they first came (to the bar), I looked up and there were like 100 of them,” DeWoody said. “It got busy. And they are nice dudes,” she told the newspaper.

DeWoody called the New Zealand sailors “very respectful.”

Bikini Cantina customer Marc Anthony said the Kiwis are better off at Aloha Tower.

“I think they are the happiest guys in RIMPAC – they are not stuck in Pearl Harbour,” he said.

“They’ve got Chinatown right here, they’ve got Waikiki, instead of spending 60 bucks for a round-trip (cab ride).”

Hooters has received many New Zealand sailors.

Gordon Biersch said it has experienced a 25 percent increase in business.

“We’re certainly happy that they are berthed here at Aloha Tower. Just a window of opportunity for additional business,” one business head said

They do mind, actually

? Stuff.co.nz

People crow that the US doesn’t care that we exclude their navy from entering NZ ports. They do, actually:

Despite New Zealand signing a sweeping new agreement on military co-operation with the United States, its anti-nuclear legislation is the reason two navy ships have been refused entry to Pearl Harbour during the world’s largest maritime exercise.

For the first time in 28 years, the Defence Force is taking part in this year’s Exercise Rim of the Pacific, known as Rimpac. The force has proudly publicised New Zealand’s involvement in the US-hosted exercise.

The frigate Te Kaha and Auxillary Support Vessel (fuel tanker) Endeavour are in Hawaii, along with a rifle platoon from the Infantry Regiment, a counter-mine team, an air force P-3K Orion and a dive team based in San Diego.

The ships made front-page news in Honolulu, with the local Star-Advertiser reporting New Zealand was the only country “refused entry” to Pearl Harbour.

Prime Minister John Key said there was “nothing new” in the United States’ position.

“That’s been the position since the (nuclear-free) legislation was passed in 1987.”

It did not affect the exercise which was being conducted out at sea.

Returning to USS Arizona

A dead Marine is returned to the USS Arizona:

A Marine who survived the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor has returned to the USS Arizona for eternity.

Divers took an urn holding the cremated remains of Frank Cabiness from the late Marine’s family, swam over to the sunken battleship, and placed the container inside during a solemn ceremony on Friday, local time.

Hawaii-based Marines from the 3rd Marine Regiment performed a rifle salute and taps during the solemn ceremony some nine years after Cabiness died in Lewisville, Texas, at the age of 86.

His son, Jerry Cabiness, said his father always wanted to return to his ship.

“He said it was because that’s where he belonged. Because he lost all of his friends there and he wanted to be with them,” Jerry Cabiness said after the service.

The family took some time to fulfil his father’s wishes because they had some financial problems and it’s expensive to travel to Hawaii, he said.

“But we finally got it done. And it was a beautiful ceremony. The Marines did him proud,” he said.

Dozens of Arizona crew members who lived through theDecember 7, 1941, attack have chosen to have their ashes interred on the battleship after death. Many do it out of a desire to join those they left behind.

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