Photo of the Day

Photo of the Day

Ursula makes the first dash into the oncoming traffic – Sabina soon follows her… The Bizarre Case Of Twins Ursula And Sabina Eriksson.

The Strange Case of The Eriksson Sisters

This is a strange tale, a really strange tale. It truly is a modern mystery that has still not really been unravelled…. it is one of the most bizarre chain of events ever captured live by TV cameras in the UK.

Swedish twins Ursula and Sabina Eriksson became known in 2008 after the pair went on a spree of violence. The two first caught the attention of the world after they both decided to run into a busy highway. After Sabina was struck by the truck, she told officers, “We say in Sweden that an accident rarely comes alone. Usually at least one more follows – maybe two.” She also exclaimed the following: “They’re going to steal your organs. I recognize you – I know you’re not real.”

After Sabina had sprinted out in front of traffic, Ursula decided to do the same. She ended with with a broken leg and other immobilizing injuries, yet also tried her best to fight off the cops.

Sabina was taken into custody and then released. Following her release, she murdered Glenn Hollinshead with a knife and then hurled herself off a 40-foot bridge. Wildly enough, she survived the plunge and is still alive today.

Be warned, the video is disturbing to watch

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Photos of the Day

Two men in a pillory at the state prison of Bibb County, Georgia. 1937.

The Second Sino-Japanese War began in July 1937 and eventually became part of the Pacific theater of World War II. Not long after the war, with Japan advancing into China, retreating Chinese troops left a blockade across Shanghai’s Whampoo River. Japan announced they were going to bomb it on August 28, 1937, and news teams gathered to capture the event.The planes arrived at 4:00 PM. Most of the reporters had left after hearing that the raid was postponed, so only one cameraman was waiting. The bombers didn’t hit the Chinese defenses. They hit the city’s train station—which housed 1,800 civilians waiting for evacuation, mostly women and children. The Japanese aircrews had mistaken them for troops. In total, 1,500 died. The photographer, H.S. Wong, saw a man rescuing children from the tracks. The man placed the first young child on the platform edge before returning to help another—and that is the picture Wong took. The injured, helpless child sitting among such devastation went on to be seen by over 130 million people around the world within a month and a half. It was key in turning international opinion against the Japanese, and Wong had to be evacuated to Hong Kong under British protection when the Japanese put a price on his head.

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Tom Crean with puppies Roger, Nell, Toby and Nelson on the Endurance expedition, 1911.

The Wild Man of Borneo

Antarctic Explorer Tom Crean

Some men are just simply built of a different constitution. Tom Crean’s accomplishments make “The Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration” the understatement of the century.

By all accounts, Tom Crean seems to have been that friend who is quietly competent. You know the buddy who doesn’t talk about being a badass, he just gets things done? He’s the one breaking trail or silently lugging more than his fair share of gear on a group trip or making the hero line look easy. Of course, those are 21st century examples of fun. Crean was an Antarctic explorer in the early 1900s, and the realities he faced were terrifying to the extreme, with legitimate life and death consequences.

Few periods of history have produced such a wealth of remarkable stories as the heroic age of expeditions to the Antarctic about 100 years ago. Little more than two decades of exploration threw up a series of powerful dramas that encapsulated the very essence of discovery—endurance, courage and tragedy. In the thick of it all was Tom Crean, an unassuming Kerryman whose extraordinary exploits made him appear as nearly indestructible as any human can be. But his amazing life remained shrouded in obscurity for over many years, known only to a few polar aficionados or bands of devoted supporters in Kerry. Yet it would be impossible to compose a history of Antarctic exploration without recognising and saluting the massive contribution he made.

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Joyce McKinney – Kirk Anderson Kidnap – Epsom Magistrates. Evidence suggested the distraught Kirk was telling the truth, and the police arrested Joyce, even though she adamantly denied the charges. Frustrated by her treatment, Joyce jumped bail and fled the country with a friend.

“Madame Mayhem

Mormon Sex in Chains Case

A cloned dog, a Mormon in mink-lined handcuffs, a former Miss World contestant and a tantalising mystery. At first it seemed a straightforward example of the oddball stories which emerge during the long, slow, news days of high summer…

Joyce McKinney said she’d fallen head-over-heels in love with the Mormon man and acknowledged stalking tracking him to England. “I loved him so much,” she told a judge, “that I would ski naked down Mount Everest in the nude with a carnation up my nose if he asked me to.”

It has been 40 years since she committed the crime that cemented her name in history for a sex scandal that captivated Britain and America. But, Joyce McKinney’s life and story still captures worldwide interest.
“Madame Mayhem,” as she has more recently been coined, was the centre of a 1970s court case known to many as the “Mormon in chains sex case” or “The Case of the Manacled Mormon.” It was shocking and absurd for the time period as well.

McKinney is an intelligent, woman who is a former Miss Wyoming World. However, McKinney had bigger plans. These plans involved kidnapping the man of her dreams. She just didn’t want him to get away.

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Marguerite Alibert. Marguerite began to make a living by seducing and courting wealthy men, and it was paying off well. She was receiving many valuable trinkets and gifts – along with a settlement from Andre Meller – but wanted more.

Murder at The Savoy Hotel

Marguerite Alibert’s story is one of gritty survival followed by a lucrative life of prostitution. She pulled herself up from a world of poverty to mingle among France’s elite, and accomplished her goal of turning affairs into large sums of money. She is commonly remembered as Maggie Meller, a surname she took from the man she claimed was her husband at 17.

In 1907, Marguerite met a man named Andre Meller. She was 17, he was 40. He was wealthy, and owned a stable full of horses – since Marguerite loved horses, that may very well have played a part in their romance. He bought her an apartment so they could conduct their relationship in private, and she took his last name. She claimed that they were married, but in reality Andre was still technically married to his first wife. Her lack of faithfulness ended the relationship in 1913. It was only one of four different surnames she would use throughout her exotic and exciting life.

She saw love not from a romantic’s point of view, but as a way to survive and thrive. Maggie Meller was even one of Prince Edward VIII’s mistresses, and went on to marry an Egyptian Prince. However, that monumental moment is where her story takes a murderous turn. Marguerite would go down in infamy as the princess who got away with murder.

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Photos of the Day

The morning after the first battle of Passchendaele, 100 years ago on Oct. 13th 1917. The First Battle of Passchendaele took place on 12 October 1917 in the Ypres Salient area of the Western Front, west of Passchendaele village, during the Third Battle of Ypres in World War I. The Allied plan to capture Passchendaele village was based on inaccurate information about the result of the previous attack of 9 October, as the period of rainy weather continued. The attack took ground in the north but early gains around Passchendaele were mostly lost to German counter-attacks. The battle was a German defensive success, although costly to both sides. British attacks were postponed until the weather improved and communications behind the front had been restored. Two German divisions intended for Italy were diverted to Flanders, to replace “extraordinarily high” losses. Ludendorff divided the Third Battle of Ypres into five periods. In the “Fourth Battle of Flanders”, from 2–21 October he described German “wastage” as “extraordinarily high”.Hindenburg claimed later that he waited with great anxiety for the wet season. The 4th Australian Division lost c. 1,000 casualties and the 3rd Australian Division c. 3,199 casualties. From 9–12 October the German 195th Division lost 3,395 casualties. There were 2,735 New Zealand casualties, 845 being killed or mortally wounded and stranded in no-man’s-land. Calculations of German losses by J. E. Edmonds, the British Official Historian have been severely criticised ever since for adding 30% to German casualty figures, to account for different methods of calculation. The New Zealand Memorial to the Missing at Tyne Cot commemorates New Zealanders killed during the Battle of Broodseinde and the First Battle of Passchendaele, who have no known grave. The death toll made this the blackest day in New Zealand history.

Tuffi (*1946 in India, † 1989 in Paris, France) was a female circus elephant that became famous in Germany in 1950 when she jumped from the suspended monorail in Wuppertal into the river below. On 21 July 1950 the circus director Franz Althoff had Tuffi, then 4 years old, take the Schwebebahn in Wuppertal, as a marketing gag. The elephant trumpeted wildly and ran through the wagon, broke through a window and fell some 12 metres (39 ft) down into theWupper river, suffering only minor injuries. A panic had broken out in the wagon and some passengers were injured. Althoff helped the elephant out of the water. Both the circus director and the official who had allowed the ride were fined. Tuffi was sold to Cirque Alexis Gruss in 1968; she died there in 1989. This manipulated picture of the fall still exists and a building near the location of the incident, between the stations Alter Markt and Adlerbrücke, shows a painting of Tuffi. A local milk-factory has chosen the name as a brand.The Wuppertal tourist information keeps an assortment of Tuffi-related souvenirs, local websites show original pictures. In 1970 Marguerita Eckel and Ernst-Andreas Ziegler published a Children’s picture book about the incident, named Tuffi und die Schwebebahn.

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James Jameson was a young heir to the Jameson Irish Whiskey fortune in the late 19th century, well before the United States prohibition movement nearly toppled the family empire. Things were still good for the Jamesons, and James enjoyed your stereotypical privileged upbringing — drinking fancy teas, travelling..

The Horrible Jameson Affair

While on an expedition into Africa during the late 19th century, James Jameson, heir to the Jameson Irish whiskey empire, reportedly asked to witness cannibalism in action. To this end, he purchased a slave girl and handed her over to men who murdered her and feasted on her flesh. While the grisly scene unfolded, Jameson is said to have sketched it out, later turning his rough illustrations into a series of watercolours.

James Jameson, heir to the Jameson Irish Whiskey fortune, was a wanna-be adventurer who tagged along on one of the last European exploration trips into the “Dark Heart of Africa,” in the late 1800s. The crew of the expedition, whose intention was to rescue a colonial Governor who they assumed was in danger, was led by famed explorer Henry M. Stanley.

However, having a famous leader didn’t save the group from endless problems. They faced danger from the local people and animals, diseases, and isolation from the outside world. They also had many reports of abuse on the trip, and it became an infamous expedition for the number of deaths that happened along the way.

One of the most unsettling accounts from that fateful trip is the story of the day James Jameson decided to buy a slave girl and watch her be killed and eaten – because he was curious about cannibalism. It may sound like an unbelievably gruesome thing for someone to do, but – amazingly – Jameson’s journal and multiple accounts of that day from other members of the crew confirm that it is true.

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Lyle Menendez, right, is seen here as a young man in this undated family photo. When asked why she has chosen to speak out for the first time in support of her cousins, Diane Vander Molen said she wanted to defend them against the trial’s prosecutor’s claims that there had been no sexual abuse in the family. “I know for 100 percent that there was,” Vander Molen said. “Their privacy was everything to them. They were completely different people when nobody was around. And then Jose and Kitty would turn on the charm when they had people over, which wasn’t very often.”

The Dysfunctional Menendez Family

Nightmare on Elm Drive

If you thought you hated your parents. The crimes committed by Lyle and Erik Menendez in 1989 took teenage angst to terrifying levels when they shot and killed their mother and father, in one of the most brutal, high-profile crimes in American history. The Menendez brothers’ homicides at a well-to-do Beverly Hills mansion rattled American people and thrust the uncomfortable topic of sexual abuse into the national spotlight. Now serving life in prison, the brothers will never see each other or the free world again.

On August 20th, 1989, Joseph Lyle Menendez, 21, and his brother, Erik, 18, shot their parents Jose and Mary Louise “Kitty” Menendez multiple times with shotguns in the den of their $5 million Spanish-style Beverly Hills mansion. Jose was shot point-blank in the head as the couple lazed in front of the TV with ice cream and strawberries, and Kitty, after attempting to flee, was shot multiple times – to the point that she no longer resembled a person.

The Menendez Brothers case received an unprecedented amount of attention through Court TV coverage of the initial trials and as a result, many became fascinated by the story. Nearly 30 years after the murders, the Menendez brothers remain an intriguing fixture in true crime history because questions still remain. In particular, what made them do it?

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Photos of the Day

Too cool for school. (Poster from the 1980’s).

On January 30th of 1990 the first McDonalds eatery opened in Moscow. It was also the first one in the whole country – in the Soviet Union. They say they were holding talks with Soviet officials about opening this venture for over 20 years – since 1976. Also, they offered 51% ownership of the venture to the Soviet state. Then, on the first day, they were expecting 1,000 people to come to the new place. How many people actually came to taste American food? 30,000 people arrived on the first day, making it the largest restaurant launch worldwide, ever.

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“Dirty Laundry” is the sixth track from Don Henley’s debut album, Can’t Stand Still.

“Dirty Laundry”

According to Eagles insiders, that laundry could get pretty stinky.

It’s not surprising that of all Don Henley’s massive hits — with the Eagles as well as solo — his most massive chart triumph was his first individual effort, “Dirty Laundry,” in 1982. Henley wrote the song as a tongue-in-cheek commentary on the sad state of the media biz, specifically the tawdry tabloid approach that categorized the TV industry at that time. “Crap is king,” he declared, making clear his disdain for the sensationalist tack news people pursued at the time, a trend that continues to the present day. In concert, he’s been known to dedicate the song to Rupert Murdoch and Bill O’Reilly, two men whose behaviour suggests they are direct descendants of the sleazy journalists Henley lambasted at the time.

In fact, Henley has plenty of dirty laundry of his own, so much so that the song was initially believed to be about his own missteps.

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