Poland

Polish girl speaks out in support of Poland’s Christian culture and heritage

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZskNmBeH0RQ

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Photo Of The Day

Irena Sendler. An unfamiliar name to most people, but this remarkable woman defied the Nazis and saved 2,500 Jewish children by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto.

Irena Sendler. An unfamiliar name to most people, but this remarkable woman defied the Nazis and saved 2,500 Jewish children by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto.

Remembering Irena

A Light that Never Went Out

Arrested, tortured, and sentenced to death, Sendler managed to escape her sentence for smuggling over 2,500 Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto and saving them from certain death.

Irena Sendler, born in 1910, in Warsaw, Poland, was raised by her parents to respect and love people regardless of their ethnicity or social status. She grew up in the town of Otwock, Poland. Her father, a physician, died from typhus that he contracted during an epidemic in 1917. He was the only doctor in his town of Otwock, near Warsaw who would treat the poor, mostly Jewish community of this tragic disease. As he was dying, he told 7-year-old Irena, “If you see someone drowning you must try to rescue them, even if you cannot swim.”

When World War II started in 1939, Irena immediately started protecting her Jewish friends in Warsaw. She worked as a social services director in Warsaw. She would make false documents for Jews in the city and had already started gathering her famous rescue network. When the Warsaw Ghetto was erected in 1940, Irena saw the danger ahead.

When liquidation started in 1942, Irena and her network accelerated the rescue process. The number 2,500, in connection with children rescued, is estimated by Irena and historians to be of this division. About 800 were taken from the Warsaw Ghetto, many of which were orphans. Approximately the same number were in orphanages and convents, Irena and her network assisted in the hiding of these children.

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Photo Of The Day

Auschwitz 31. Women survivors huddled in a prisoner barracks shortly after Soviet forces liberated the Auschwitz camp. Auschwitz, Poland, 1945.

Auschwitz 31. Women survivors huddled in a prisoner barracks shortly after Soviet forces liberated the Auschwitz camp. Auschwitz, Poland, 1945.

How One Woman Delivered 3,000 Babies During The Holocaust

Auschwitz had all sorts of facilities, such as sleeping quarters, offices, kitchens and latrines. It also had a “sick ward” where, in atrocious conditions, sick prisoners were looked after by physicians who were prisoners themselves. Anyone who appeared unlikely to get well was killed. Thus the physicians were constantly concealing serious cases by falsifying records to permit a longer stay to those who otherwise would have been sent to the crematorium. Almost all survivors of Auschwitz suffered from typhoid, a disease that qualified inmates for liquidation, but was never reported thanks to the courage of the physicians. They were risking their lives since the punishment for breaking any rule in the concentration camp was death. Auschwitz also had a “maternity-ward.” Many of the women who arrived at the camp were pregnant. They were needed for work; their babies were not. One of the midwives working in the ward was Stanislawa Leszczynska.

When Stanislawa Leszczyńska first became a midwife, she never could have imagined that she would one day be whisked away from her home in Poland, where she routinely walked miles to deliver babies, and into the real-life nightmare of Auschwitz. After the murder of her husband in Poland and the forced removal of her son to another work camp, Stanislawa and her daughter entered Auschwitz with only one hope: that they would survive.

Born Stanislawa Zambrzyska in 1896, she married Bronislaw Leszczynski in 1916 and together they had two sons and a daughter. In 1922, she graduated from a school for midwives and began working in the poorest districts of Lodz. In pre-war Poland, babies were normally delivered at home. Stanislawa made herself available at any time, walking many kilometers to the homes of the women she helped. Her children recall that she often worked nights but she never slept during the day.

After the war, she returned to her job in Lodz. Her husband had been killed in the Warsaw uprising of 1944, but all of her children survived and, inspired by their mother’s example, went on to become physicians. Stanislawa supported their education, earning the family livelihood through a devoted service to childbirth.

In March 1957, as her retirement neared, a reception was organized to commemorate her 35 years in the profession. Her son, Dr. Bronislaw Leszczynski, remarked to her before the reception that she might be asked about Auschwitz. Until that time, she had said nothing about her work in the concentration camp. Her son began taking notes and later, during the reception when all the speeches were over, he stood up and told his mother’s story.

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Eye Witness account of third world invasion

Here is an eye-witness account from Kamil Bulonis, a Polish travel blog writer, who was present on the Italian-Austrian border when the immigrants arrived on mass. Eye witness accounts like this are invaluable as they tell us what is happening without the rose tinted glasses of the MSM.It has been translated from Polish. All photos were taken on the Hungarian-Austrian border.

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Half an hour ago on the border between Italy and Austria I saw with my own eyes a great many immigrants …With all solidarity with people in difficult circumstances I have to say that what I saw arouses horror … This huge mass of people – sorry, that I’ll write this – but these are absolute savages … Vulgar, throwing bottles, shouting loudly “We want to Germany!” – and is Germany a paradise now?

I saw how they surrounded a car of an elderly Italian woman, pulled her by her hair out of the car and wanted to drive away in the car. They tried to overturn the bus in I travelled myself with a group of others. They were throwing faeces at us, banging on the doors to force the driver to open them, spat at the windscreen … I ask for what purpose? How is this savagery to assimilate in Germany?

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Photo Of The Day

Photographer: Pvt. Ralph Forney. (Army)  This photo has been colourized.

Photographer: Pvt. Ralph Forney. (Army)
This photo has been colourized.

Concentration Camp Inmate

Breaks Out in Tears in Wöbbelin

4th of May 1945

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Toby Manhire wants us to follow in Denmark and Sweden’s footsteps.

Those who don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Toby Manhire is such a person. Rather than do what Churchill did when he joined England in the fight against Nazism he thinks that a more gutsy decision would be to increase our immigration, thereby bringing into our democratic country the very ideology that John Key wants us to oppose.

Sweden and Denmark increased their immigration and look what happened.

Woe to anyone in Sweden who dissents from the orthodox view that welcoming large numbers of indigent peoples from such countries as Iraq, Syria, and Somalia is anything but a fine and noble idea. Even to argue that permitting about 1 percent of the existing population to emigrate annually from an alien civilization renders one politically, socially, and even legally beyond the pale. (I know a journalist threatened with arrest for mild dissent on this issue.) Stating that there exists a Swedish culture worth preserving meets with puzzlement. And yet, the realities of immigration are apparent for all to see: welfare dependency, violent bigotry against Christians and Jews, and a wide range of social pathologies from unemployment to politically motivated rape. Accordingly, ever-increasing numbers of Swedes find themselves — despite known hazards — opting out of the consensus and worrying about their country’s cultural suicide.
-nationalreview.com

All this is part, say critics, of a decade-long transformation in Denmark’s approach to immigration and integration, under pressure from the populist Danish People’s party, the DPP… Denmark’s Muslim population are the party’s particular focus. There are many Muslims, it says, who are unwilling to integrate and hostile to “Danish values” such as free speech.

-BBC.com

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Hans Runesson.

Photo: Hans Runesson.

A Woman Hitting a Neo-Nazi With Her Handbag

Hans Runesson’s classic image from the Nordic National Party rally in Växjö, The iconic image was named the “century’s image.”

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Photo Of The Day

Picture from the USHMM Photo Archives, courtesy of the Israel Government Press Office. Defendant Adolf Eichmann takes notes during his trial in Jerusalem. The glass booth in which Eichmann sat was erected to protect him from assassination. (May 29, 1961).

Picture from the USHMM Photo Archives, courtesy of the Israel Government Press Office. Defendant Adolf Eichmann takes notes during his trial in Jerusalem. The glass booth in which Eichmann sat was erected to protect him from assassination. (May 29, 1961).

Eichmann Trial

The Trial That Taught the World About the Horrors of the Holocaust

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: NBC News

Photo: NBC News

Auschwitz Survivor Gena Turgel Walked Out of Gas Chamber Alive

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The last voices of The Holocaust

Today is the seventieth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

The Washington Post has produced this clip.

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