Ramadi

Knock, knock…

Knock knock.

Who’s there?

Brimstone

Brimstone who?

RAF fighter pilots have been filmed destroying an ISIS held building in Iraq with two laser guided Brimstone missiles.

The footage shows precision rockets, which are said to cost £175,000 a piece, flying through the window before exploding.

The terror group’s machine gunners were firing on Iraqi troops in Ramadi, just 60 miles from Baghdad, when the British jets flew over and levelled the structure.

Typhoon jets used a Paveway rocket to destroy an excavator which was converted into a giant booby trap and hidden amongst the trees in Ramadi later that day.

Footage of that strike, which also took place on February 3, showed the large vehicle being torn apart by the laser guided weapon.   Read more »

1000m, three dead wogs, the SAS and a 50cal sniper rifle

Pretty impressive shooting from an SAS sniper and his .50cal sniper rifle:

An expert SAS sniper took out three ISIS bombers by shooting through a 10inch wall, from a kilometre away with the world’s most powerful rifle.

The marksman, considered one of the best in the special forces, fired 30 armour-piercing rounds from his Barrett Light .50 calibre rifle into a two-storey command post in the city of Ramadi in Iraq.

The daring and skillfully executed mission which was called a ‘classic SAS operation’ saved the lives of around 20 people according to military sources.

Holding the rank of staff-sergeant, the sniper was part of an elite team of military advisers embedded in the Iraqi army.

After discovering that the bombers were in the building, a number of offensive options were considered including an air strike and a rocket launch.

However, both were deemed too dangerous to civilians as a number of innocent people were being used as human shields around the property.

A source told the Daily Star Sunday: ‘The SAS always like to think out of the box.    Read more »

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Kiwi-trained troops helped liberate Ramadi from Daesh

Gerry Brownlee is chuffed  – our troops helped to train the Iraqi soldiers who took Ramadi off Daesh.

Iraqi troops trained by New Zealand soldiers were among those who took the city of Ramadi from Islamic State, Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says.

Victory in Ramadi, which was seized by IS in May, is the first major triumph for Iraq’s mainly US-trained army since it collapsed in the face of an assault by the hardline Sunni militants 18 months ago.

The city, 130km west of Baghdad, was taken earlier this week.

“The success of these troops results from their commitment to the training programme they have been involved in. New Zealand and Australian trainers can take some pride over the successful action by the recruits,” Mr Brownlee said on Thursday.   Read more »

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Bizarre rant from Armstrong on Iraq deployment

I’m getting a bit sick of John Armstrong and his prognostications on defence matters.

New Zealand’s 100-plus contingent of military training specialists plus support personnel have barely arrived in Iraq. Yet the folly of this military (mis)adventure is already rapidly becoming apparent.

Last week’s fall of the city of Ramadi after Iraqi forces capitulated to Islamic State fighters, despite heavily outnumbering their enemy, has shifted the front-line in this sectarian struggle worryingly close to Taji, the huge military camp within which the New Zealanders are based alongside Australian counterparts.

Unless the Isis (Islamic State) advance is halted, the New Zealand Government is going to be faced with a major dilemma at some point in the not-too-distant future: pull the training team out of Iraq and lose face, plus earn black marks from the Americans and the Australians; or stick it out for the sake of good form and loyalty to allies and gamble on things not deteriorating with the risks this brings, including the possibility of casualties.

National’s predicament was neatly summed up by New Zealand First MP and former Army officer Ron Mark in an entry on his Facebook page last Friday.

“Latest update from the US on Isis. Taji is only 91km from Ramadi. The same distance I drive from Carterton to Wellington to attend Parliament. Isis could be in artillery range of our troops in 30 minutes.” He added a question for Mr Key: “What’s our plan, John?”

I’m not sure listening to a former truck mechanic on military matters is wise.  Read more »

Face of the Day

A new book is about to be released about Al Shatan (The Devil) to Iraqi insurgents, The Legend to fellow SEAL Team members:

The book is an autobiography of SEAL Chief Chris Kyle, who is the record-holding sniper in U.S. military history. Kyle has more than 150 officially confirmed kills (the previous American record was 109), though his remarkable career total has not been made public by the Pentagon. In his ten years (1999-2009) with the United States Navy SEAL Teams, Chris was deployed four times to Iraq and was awarded the two Silver Stars and five Bronze Stars with Valor. Chris was shot on two separate occasions and was in numerous IED explosions. Despite numerous wounds and an injury to his knee that eventually required surgery, Chris remained with his unit during combat. While in Ramadi it was learned that Chris had a bounty put on his head by local insurgents.  His nickname, given to him by the terrorists, was Al Shatan–the Devil. His fellow SEALs had begun referring to him by a different name: The Legend.