Raoul Neave

Judge calls bull on firearms claims from crims

Judge Raoul Neave used to be a dud judge, but lately has been getting some cases dead right.

His latest effort is to call bull on claims by crims that the firearms they have are for legitimate reasons.

A judge says he is amazed at how many drug offenders have firearms they claim are for shooting wildlife.

Judge Raoul Neave raised the issue at the sentencing of Jason Richard Beckley, 42, and Raymond Donal Todd, 41, both of Ashburton, in the Christchurch District Court today.

The judge said many people caught with drugs also have firearms – for the purpose of shooting rabbits, pigeons or other wildlife, they claim.

In the case of Ashburton drugs arrests, a pistol had been found in a backpack with drugs and paraphernalia, and a knife and balaclava.

“They must have been pretty savage pigeons,” Neave said.

[…]   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Judge Raoul Neave comes good

I have written before about Judge Raoul Neave and some of his judgements…but yesterday he came good, slamming some ratbags in Christchurch.

Three young men wept in court as they were jailed for more than two years for vandalising 11 abandoned Christchurch homes in a destructive rampage.

Andrew Hunton, 21, Bradley Burlton, 19, and Jordan Harrison, 19, were labelled “mindless idiots” by Judge Raoul Neave in the Christchurch District Court this afternoon.

The men were arrested last August after setting a quake-damaged house alight and destroying tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of property at the other homes.

They plead guilty to 11 joint charges of burglary, one of attempted burglary and one of arson.

Judge Neave told the court the offending was so severe he had no option but to send all three to prison.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Latest Truth on sale tomorow

spacies15-2The latest Truth is on sale tomorrow.

News Headlines:

Truth: News Headlines

Sports Headlines:

Truth: Sports Headlines

All Whaleoil readers need to go buy Truth tomorrow…send me a photo of you with your paper and you will go in the draw to win a $2000 retro Spacies Machine…like the one we have in the office…in fact it is actually the one in the office….oh and you need to like Truth on Facebook.

TRUTH_Page_1_Feb21

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

A long drop off a short rope

Surely the time has come to re-visit the farce of home detention. Especially when filthy pedo porn merchants get home detention rather than a cell in general population.

A Christchurch Christian journalist has admitted making intimate videos of a student at home and a 5-year-old girl at a church expo.

John Raymond McNeil, 67, was granted home detention at his Christchurch District Court sentencing, but his internet access will be blocked as part of the sentence.

He was found with 1000 child-pornography images on his computer, which he had viewed on the internet, and three videos he had made.

He had admitted three charges of making intimate visual recordings and 40 charges of possessing objectionable publications – images and stories.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Steals car because of sore feet, runs from crash scene

Sadly a lot of the stories I’ve posted about dimwits have come from Southland, but some clowns just need their nose rubbed in it. Take the following expert in jackassery:

A teenager who stole a vehicle because his feet were sore, crashed it into another vehicle the next day.

Nicholas Folster, 18, appeared before Judge Raoul Neave in the Invercargill District Court yesterday and admitted two charges of driving recklessly causing injury, stealing a vehicle and failing to stop after an accident on December 30.

He was remanded on bail to March 22 for sentence.

Prosecutor Penny Stratford said Folster stole an unlocked car while walking on Winton-Wreys Bush Highway.

He drove it to Te Anau and the next morning to Invercargill. While in Tweed St he put the car into a low gear, causing smoke to come off the tyres and the car to fishtail, she said.

The car continued fishtailing for about 1 kilometre before Folster lost control, crossed the centre line, collided with another vehicle with two people in it and continued into a fence, Ms Stratford said.

Folster ran from the scene. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Hallwright Cauterised In Silence

It looks like suppression was a waste of time and the details Neave J. did not allow published was Guy Hallwright, the road rager was dumped by Forsyth Barr.

Asked when he would talk about it, he replied: “Possibly never, especially to the Herald.”

His future plans were uncertain. “I’m going to have a break. I’ve got some community work to do, as you know.”

Hallwright does not like the “H” for some reason.

But the Good Old Boys have closed ranks down at the Club, made their secret hand shakes and are not talking.

“I think they just removed him totally and cauterised the wound,” the source said.

He said the small and normally gossip-filled share market had gone strangely silent after the announcement.

“Normally the other brokers are quick to put the boot in, but there was nothing from anybody,” he said.

“There has not been any noise. No discussion. Nothing.”

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Braunias on Judge Raoul Neave

Steve Braunias has written perhaps his best ever “Secret Diary…of  Judge Raoul Neave“:

MONDAY

One finds one remains in hot water over this silly business about the poor man who drove over the Korean.

The gutter press was full of it this morning. It quite put me off my breakfast.

“Darling,” said the old girl, “you haven’t touched your boiled egg. Would you like me to cut your toast into soldiers?”

I put on a brave face, and said I wasn’t hungry.

In fact I was famished by the time I stepped through the front door of my club.

Tuppy Glossop was in the games room, throwing a dwarf. “Yowsa!”, he cried, as the little fellow flew through a hoop.

He said, “Want a turn? Try your luck with this one. Officially, he’s a midget, not a dwarf; marvellously aerodynamic.”

“No thanks,” I said, and sank into a horsehair armchair.

“Why the long face?”

Tuppy never follows the news. He really has no idea what’s going on in the world. Damned good MP, though.

He sank into the armchair next to mine while I told him all about the case of the Forsyth Barr senior analyst – a pillar of the community, a man with an impeccable character and spotless record, married, a parent, in the top tax bracket – who drove his Saab over a man who upset him.

I told him it wasn’t a hit and run because spotless pillars don’t do that.

Tuppy broke wind. “Yowsa!” he cried. “Ah, the old slap on the wrist with a wet bus ticket,” he snorted.

I began telling him about the rest of my judgment – that I’d criticised media interest in the case as “vulgar and prurient” – when I realised he’d snored off.

I went into the dining room to chew it over, but ordered fish pie for my main and custard for dessert.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Hallwright sentence to be appealed

It looks like the sentence of hit and run driver Guy Hallwright is to be appealed by the Solicitor-General after silly comments by the Judge were widely reported. I wonder when Guy Hallwright will give up fighting the arse card from his employer, since his constant appearance in the media is demonstrably causing him to bring the firm into disrepute:

The cosy boys club atmosphere that appeared to exist in this case needs to be closely looked at.

In a rare legal move, the Solicitor-General is considering an appeal against the sentence imposed on investment banker Guy Hallwright who was found guilty of running down a man in a road rage incident.

A spokeswoman for the Solicitor-General said a “thorough review” of the case was being carried out to decide whether there were grounds for an appeal.

The appeal is backed by Auckland Council for Civil Liberties president Barry Wilson, who wrote a letter to Solicitor-General Michael Heron saying the court’s handling of the matter “reinforces the public perception of a two-tier justice system”.

In the Auckland District Court last month, Judge Raoul Neave sentenced Hallwright, a senior market analyst with Forsyth Barr, to 250 hours of community work, banned him from driving for 18 months and ordered him to pay $20,000 reparation to Sung Jin Kim.

Mr Kim suffered two broken legs when Hallwright hit him with his car after an argument on Mt Eden Rd in September 2010.

Hallwright drove off, but returned to the scene later.

While passing sentence, Judge Neave said Hallwright was a contributor to society with a “spotless reputation” and “impeccable character” and it was highly unlikely he would have driven at Mr Kim.

He said the reparation payment represented Hallwright’s remorse, and was not a legal system loophole that allowed rich people to buy their way out of more serious sentences.

Mr Wilson said the comments were bizarre, and the public clearly regarded the sentence as inadequate.

“A major flaw in the judge’s sentencing comments was that he appeared to deliver a glowing tribute to the defendant based on a limited knowledge of his background.

“To the extent that this contradicted the jury’s verdict, it contributed to the public perception of an inadequate sentence.”

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Out of Touch

There are additional calls for the Judge in the Guy Hallright case to step aside as he is out of touch:

The family of a young mother killed by a driver in an unwarranted, unregistered car wants the sentencing judge to step down, saying he has lost touch with society.

Judge Raoul Neave sentenced the driver to nine months’ home detention and told him that to give meaning to Danielle Reeves’ life he should make a success of his own.

Her family said Danielle Reeves’ life already had meaning.

Judge Neave is the same judge who this week sentenced a banker to community service after he ran over a driver during a road rage incident.

Tracy Reeves is now mother to her granddaughter, Kylah. Her own daughter, Kylah’s mum Danielle, was killed in a car accident a year ago.

The young male driver had been trying to prove to her that he could drift his car on a wet night. A month ago he was sentenced to nine months’ home detention by Judge Neave.

“I expected some justice,” says Tracy Reeves. “I wanted him to learn that this behaviour isn’t acceptable. Home detention, nine months – he’s been grounded. It’s disgusting.”

The Judge also foolishly insulted media who are also now calling for him to be held to account:

Judge Neave has also been slated by media commentators since Guy Hallwright’s sentencing, when he described the media as vulgar and claimed it took an unhealthy degree of glee in the misfortune of someone seen to be in a privileged position.

“The judge has become the target now,” says journalist Susan Baldacci. “Frankly from what I’ve seen, and I wasn’t in the courtroom, but from what I have seen, rightfully so.”

“It showed that the judge is completely out of touch with most New Zealanders,” says journalist Bill Ralston.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.