research

Twitter account shut down for exposing Academics poor work to ridicule

The twitter account that was shut down for peer reviewing other Academics work has been replaced with this twitter account which seems to be continuing on the work done by the first account.Social Justice Bullies declared ?war on the original twitter account when they realised that an anonymous colleague was exposing their research to ridicule.

A popular Twitter account that highlighted ridiculous academic papers from the social sciences and humanities ? some taxpayer-funded ? was abruptly deleted recently apparently because critics threatened to expose the name of the anonymous tweeter, who feared career-ending retaliation from campus colleagues.

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Photo Of The Day

November 1925. Tutankhamun's burial mask.The photo above was taken just as King Tut?s coffin lid was taken off. Tutankhamun is seen lying intact with a 24-pound burial mask made of solid gold. Photo colorizer Jordan Lloyd of Dynamichrome was recently commissioned to digitally color reconstructed photos of the discovery and exploration of Tutankhaten?s tomb starting in 1922. The project took several months, and a great deal of research was done into finding accurate color references for things seen in the photos. Image by Harry Burton. ?The Griffith Institute, Oxford.

November 1925. Tutankhamun’s burial mask.The photo above was taken just as King Tut?s coffin lid was taken off. Tutankhamun is seen lying intact with a 24-pound burial mask made of solid gold. Photo colorizer Jordan Lloyd of Dynamichrome was recently commissioned to digitally colour reconstructed photos of the discovery and exploration of Tutankhaten?s tomb starting in 1922. The project took several months, and a great deal of research was done into finding accurate color references for things seen in the photos. Image by Harry Burton. ?The Griffith Institute, Oxford.

?I see wonderful things?

Howard Carter, 1922

Entering King Tut’s Tomb

 

“My first care was to locate the wooden lintel above the door: then very carefully I chipped away the plaster and picked out the small stones which formed the uppermost layer of the filling. The temptation to stop and peer inside at every moment was irresistible, and when, after about ten minutes’ work, I had made a hole large enough to enable me to do so, I inserted an electric torch. An astonishing sight its light revealed, for there, within a yard of the doorway, stretching as far as one could see and blocking the entrance to the chamber, stood what to all appearances was a solid wall of gold.”

Howard Carter

While Howard Carter’s find of the mostly intact tomb of a pharaoh may have been lucky, it was the result of a dedicated career in Egyptology and the culmination of consistent exploration.

Howard Carter was born on May 9th, 1874 in the small town of Kensington, London, England. His father, an artist named Samuel John Carter who drew portraits (mostly of animals) for local landowners, trained Howard in the fundamentals of drawing and painting. He was Samuel Carter’s youngest son. But Howard Carter developed an early interest in Egypt, so when he was 17 years old, under the influence of Lady Amherst, a family acquaintance, he set sail for Alexandria, Egypt. It would be his first trip outside of England, and he hoped to work with the Egyptian Exploration Fund as a tracer. Tracers copied drawings and inscriptions on paper for further study.

His first assignment came at?Bani Hassan, where he was tasked with recording and copying the scenes from the walls of the tombs of the princes of Middle Egypt. It is said that he worked diligently throughout the day, and slept with the bats in the tombs at night.

It was under the direction of?William Flinders Petrie?that Carter grew into his own as an archaeologist. Considered as one of the best field archaeologists of this time, Petrie really did not believe that Carter would ever become a good excavator. Yet Carter could have had no better teacher at this point in time. At?el Amrna, Carter proved Petrie wrong by unearthing several important finds. During this training period, Carter also worked under Gaston Maspero, who would later become the Director of the Egyptian Antiquities Service.

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Photo Of The Day

An aerial view of Freeman Ranch.(Daniel Wescott)

An aerial view of Freeman Ranch.(Daniel Wescott)

Body Farm

How do forensics experts know what they know? A lot of it is due to research done on body farms, research facilities that examine how bodies decompose.

Through the 1970s, forensic scientists still largely relied on research involving pig carcasses when consulting on criminal cases and attempting to determine the all-important post-mortem interval ? the time between when a person dies and when his or her body is found. No one had ever watched a human body decay in a controlled setting firsthand.

That changed in 1980 at the University of Tennessee, where the anthropologist William Bass founded the first body farm. Bass got the idea after being called on to help police in a local murder case: they’d found a disturbed Civil War-era grave and suspected that the body in it was a recent one, swapped in by the suspect to conceal the evidence. Bass analyzed the body’s clothing and other factors and found that wasn’t the case. But he was troubled by the?incomplete knowledge of human decomposition.

So he started collecting bodies. The very first one ? a 73-year-old man who’d died of heart disease ? was left to decay at an abandoned farm that had been donated to the university, just outside the town of Knoxville. Eventually, Bass and his students fenced in a 1.3-acre patch of woods on the property and began studying multiple bodies at once.

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Is pride keeping Peter Dunne from doing the decent thing? Or is it something more sinister?

I’ve covered the issue of legal highs versus natural marijuana many times. ?And I’ve also shown how medical marijuana isn’t just some sneaky back door for people to justify the use of what continues to be an illegal drug, but it is at times the only substance to bring relief to very painful or distressed lives.

Yet our champion of the legal high, Peter Dunne, keeps wanting nothing to do with the idea.

Debate over medical cannabis has been hijacked by “nuisance” campaigners who are making it harder for people with serious diseases, says Associate Health Minister Peter Dunne.

The Government has come under renewed pressure to conduct trials on medicinal cannabis products, while New South Wales Premier Mike Baird said last week he was in support of NSW becoming the first Australian state to legalise medicinal cannabis for terminally ill patients.

Dunne believed there was only a small number of cases where people were “genuinely ill” and that many who lobbied him on the subject were secretly hoping to legalise weed for recreational use.

“There are a lot of people leaping on the bandwagon because they see it as a way of achieving another objective, which has nothing to do with medical cannabis,” he said. “They’re a nuisance. Sadly what they’re doing is muddying the waters for those who may have a genuine case.”

The comments have drawn criticism from parents of children with rare diseases who say Dunne has deflected responsibility on the issue.

You have to wonder where his head is at. ? When you look someone in the eye that is in excruciating pain every hour of their lives, and tell them that they?can’t have low medical quantities of THC as pain relief, because it will open the door for others to abuse it, what sort of objectives do you have as a minister?

Is all just about money and law an order? ? Read more »

Women, what really turns you on?

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I doubt that research turns you on, yet that’s what they did to get these non-surprising findings.

Researchers have finally answered the question of what really turns a woman on.

A new study has analysed the effects of light touch, pressure and vibration on the female body to find out exactly where the most sensitive areas are.

Researchers found that for light touch, the neck was most sensitive, for pressure the clitoris and nipple were most sensitive, and for vibration the clitoris was the most sensitive part of the body.

Strap me down and call me an ambulance, this ground breaking stuff has got me in a near coma. ? Read more »

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Photo Of The Day

Credit: David Jay/The Scar Project

Credit: David Jay/The Scar Project

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What should we do with child abusers that teach our children?

The Australians are trying to get a handle on child abuse. ?Brave move. ?Except they’re ?only going to look at a third of it. ?Vice reports

Australia is having a?Royal Commission to look at child abuse in institutional settings, and it’s come up with a whole lot of nasty stuff that’s gone on for decades in churches, schools, orphanages and other places where men can prey on kids. However, two thirds of child abuse won’t be looked at by the Commission because it happens to kids at home.

It’s difficult to find reliable statistics that show just how prevalent child sexual abuse is because it’s often not reported. However, from what statistics are available, it’s possible to see some trends.

The ABS estimates that in Australia?12 percent of women and 4.5 percent of men?have been or will be abused before they reach 15. In other words, 72 percent of child sexual abuse happens to girls. Girls are most likely to be abused by a relative or their father, and are unlikely to be abused by a stranger. Boys are most likely to be abused by someone they know, like a teacher or priest, or a stranger, and are unlikely to be abused by their father or stepfather.

If that’s the sort of numbers coming out of Australia, our own child abuse statistics won’t be any better. ? Read more »

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