salt tax

Health troughers not even hiding their dirty tactics

I warned food industry players two years ago that a war was coming and they were the targets of that war.

The?health troughers, funded with millions of dollars of taxpayer funding, were going to target them and use brutal tactics like those used against the tobacco industry. Two years on I have been proved right and the attack is massive with calls now for fat, sugar and salt taxes and covering almost every primary food producer in New Zealand.

The health troughers aren’t even coy anymore about where they get their inspiration for their draconian efforts to control the New Zealand population.

Report co-author, Cliona Ni Mhurchu, said taxation would lead to behavioural change.

We know from previous research around tobacco, and a lot of the work that’s been done, that price is a really big lever in terms of driving behaviour change, and also there are an increasing number of studies coming out overseas, as well, that suggest that food pricing is important too.”

She said the proposed tax increase was affordable.

Except the health troughers forget that tobacco initiatives only ever affect consumers of the product…not every single person in the country. If people didn’t want to pay tobacco taxes then they simply stopped smoking.

Avoiding sugar, fat and salt taxes will be unavoidable for everyone, including those with bean-pole and half sucked throatie body types. ?? Read more »

$11 million researcher pimps tax increases

Both the Herald and Stuff are pimping the lines of Cliona Ni Mhurchu calling for 20% taxes on fat, salt, essentially all foods including dairy, meat and poultry.

Let?s take a look at this, particularly as Cliona Ni Mhurchu has tucked into more than $11 million dollars of funding for her research projects.

First there?s the usual academic charade of the study?s authors to make it sound more authoritative.

?A flat tax of 20 per cent on major dietary sources of saturated fat alone could prevent up to 1500 early deaths, the research – resulting from a joint study between Auckland, Otago and Oxford Universities – finds.

Here?s what happens. One academic comes up with an idea and drafts a report presenting their work. To make it more credible among fellow academics, they need to get more academic names attached to it. So the lead author pimps out the paper to known associates within the academic world who, in turn, are more than happy to put their names to it (and the universities they?re working at) thereby giving the effect that the research looks as though it?s backed by lots of academics/universities.

In turn these other academics then pimp out the paper as one of their own and as being ?published? and add it to their bios to puff themselves up even more full of self importance.

But back to this ?new research?. ?? Read more »

Otago Uni’s Department of Arse Clowns

Arse Clowns

The other day academics troughers from the University of Otago?s Department of Public Health Troughers pimped out a claim that a salt tax could reap in $450 million.

The Taxpayers thought the claim was a pile of goat poo and looked into this wild claim.

As a result of their investigations they?re now calling out Otago University to pull in their researchers.

Research by the Taxpayers? Union indicates that the $450 million tax revenue suggested by Otago University Associate Professor Nick Wilson from a salt tax would result in a 2,500% increase in the price of salt for Kiwi consumers.

Taxpayers? Union Executive Director, Jordan Williams, says:

?The vast majority of the salt manufactured in New Zealand is used for pharmaceutical and agricultural purposes, with only around 30,000 tonnes being used for food products.Professor Wilson?s $450 million over 30,000?tonnes is $15,000?in tax per tonne. A tonne of food grade salt?is currently worth around $600 in the wholesale market.?

?Unless Professor?Wilson is wanting to tax the salt consumed by cows and the saline solution used by hospitals, his numbers mean consumers will be paying 25?times the?current?price for salt.?* ? Read more »