Secularism

Women’s Rights are universal but do Western Feminists’ actions match their words?

Western feminists say that women’s rights are universal but their actions indicate that they are only interested in Muslim women’s rights if they live in a Western country and even then they are very selective about which rights they are prepared to speak up about. They become outraged when Muslim women are told to dress like French women in France but have no interest in Muslim women being forced to dress like Fundamentalist Muslims in Iran.

Even worse than this disinterest in the plight of Muslim women overseas is the sad fact that many feminists will turn on anyone who does have the courage to make a stand on these issues. Western feminist Nazi Paikidze made a stand for the Muslim women of Iran and was smeared as an anti-Muslim bigot by her fellow feminists.

At a conference for Women in Secularism 

Maryam Namazie outlined the absolutely heart-wrenching situation for women in Iran—a situation that gets zero traction from the same media outlets that flooded our news feeds with condemnation of the Burkini Ban.  Why are we so outraged when women are told what to wear in France, but we ignore the same situation in Saudi, Iran, Somalia, Afghanistan, etc? Why are the women in France more valuable than the women in MENA? Where is the outrage? Where are our allies?

We will fight for your freedom to wear what you want…but not if you’re in the Muslim world

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A smart Political Party would keep New Zealand safe

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Why are we so safe?

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Left-wing blog post won’t say the I word

I was fascinated to come across an article critical of religion on a NZ left-wing blog site. NZ left-wing blogs have been consistently critical of Christianity and God and supportive of secularism and atheism yet, at the same time, apologists for Islam and Allah. The article proposed banning all religions but both it and the comments only acknowledged Christianity. Not one person was prepared to utter the I word.

I’m a little worried about God.

Not only does God not exist, the reasons for needing him to exist are fast fading. The human race is approaching the end of its adolescent years and is heading for maturity.

…Clearly, the world’s population is still mostly religious. But the countries where citizens are happiest are, for the most part, agnostic and social democratic. The Nordic example is where the world should be heading as a next step.

Given that there is no God and no  is reason for there to be a God, what do we do about religion? Should we remain tolerant of the unfounded beliefs of the billions of adherents? Should we continue to parse individual religions, identifying some strains of faith as being acceptable, while decrying other, more militant, sects?

I think it’s time to end religion.

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Turkish women have much more to lose if secularism is destroyed and a religious order is introduced

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Turkey Istanbul – young women on the fun fair in Eguep photographer: Claudia Wiens

“Turkey’s government is in danger of losing the secularism that sets it apart from other Muslim countries.Over the years statements have been made about women that undermine its moderate appearance to the rest of the world. Turkey is a country where Muslim women have more freedom than Muslim women in other Muslim countries but that freedom is under threat. 

Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan, forever touted as a real “moderate” in the Muslim world, has a few choice words for women who choose career over motherhood: you’re deficient half-persons.

“A woman who abstains from maternity by saying ‘I am working’ means that she is actually denying her femininity,” Erdogan said in a speech in Istanbul on Sunday. He went on to clarify that such women are “deficient” and “half-persons.” NBC reports

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A contest of ideas

Quote from Rowan Atkinson

Quote from Rowan Atkinson

What I love so much about democracy and Freedom of Speech is that we can have an open and honest exchange of ideas. We can debate issues, we can question. We do not have to follow any doctrine blindly and unquestioningly.

Today we do not have to buy anything off the rack, we can customise it to suit us and the same goes with our belief systems.

One size does not fit all and so as we grow we listen and observe, we debate and we reason, constantly re evaluating the beliefs we hold dear. At least that is how it is for the women in my family. My mother was brought up a Catholic and now considers herself a Humanist.

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Intolerant liberal ratbags

We see this here…the liberal left shouting down anyone who dares voice an opinion against what they think.

We saw it with the boycott organised against Willie and JT…the left always go for your money…they have tried the same with me several times.

Check out the comments at The Daily blog or the Standard recently when discussing me or David Farrar and you will see death wishes upon us, ranting that we should be silenced and so forth.

The liberal left are not fans of free speech and now their terror tactics are starting to bite.

[N]ot only Christians, but also Muslims and Jews, increasingly feel they are no longer free to express any belief, no matter how deeply felt, that runs counter to the prevailing fashions for superficial “tolerance” and “equality” (terms which no longer bear their dictionary meaning but are part of a political jargon in which only certain views, and certain groups, count as legitimate).

Only 50 years ago, liberals supported “alternative culture”; they manned the barricades in protest against the establishment position on war, race and feminism. Today, liberals abhor any alternative to their credo. No one should offer an opinion that runs against the grain on issues that liberals consider “set in stone”, such as sexuality or the sanctity of life.

Intolerance is no longer the prerogative of overt racists and other bigots – it is state-sanctioned. It is no longer the case that the authorities are impartial on matters of belief, and will intervene to protect the interests and heritage of the weak. When it comes to crushing the rights of those who dissent from the new orthodoxy, politicians and bureaucrats alike are in the forefront of the attacks, not the defence.

I believe that religious liberty is mean­ingless if religious subcultures do not have the right to practise and preach according to their beliefs. These views – for example, on abortion, adoption, divorce, marriage, promiscuity and euthanasia – may be unfashionable. They certainly will strike many liberal-minded outsiders as harsh, impractical, outmoded, and irrelevant.

But that is not the point. Adherents of these beliefs should not face life-ruining disadvantages. They should not have to close their businesses, as happened to the Christian couple who said only married heterosexual couples could stay at their bed and breakfast. They should not lose their jobs, which was the case of the registrar who refused to marry gays. When Britain was fighting for its life in the Second World War, it never forced pacifists to bear arms. So why force the closure of a Catholic adoption agency that for almost 150 years has placed some of society’s most vulnerable children with loving parents?   Read more »

Are atheists more intelligent than religious people?

Are atheists more intelligent than religious people? Quite possibly, on average.

Tom Chivers comes to the conclusion that even though evidence suggests atheists might be more intelligent than religious people it doesn’t necessarily follow that they are smarter.

[T]he internet is currently interested in a meta-analysis, published in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Review, which finds that atheists have a higher IQ, on average, than the religious. They base this on a review of 63 studies, but, as the authors say, this news isn’t new. The evidence has been around for a while.

There are several reasons given, including a suggestion that the more intelligent you are, the more likely you are to need empirical and logical reasons to believe something; and, interestingly, that the things that religion does for people (helping them to delay gratification for greater future reward; providing an “anchor” in their life in hard times) intelligent people have less need for, because they use other methods. It’s an interesting study.  Read more »