Sex

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Anna Fallarino, in February 1970, at the behest of her husband, was one of the first women in Italy to undergo in a Roman clinic in a breast augmentation with silicone implants, along with a tummy tuck reductive.

Italy’s Forbidden ‘Orgy Island’

With its emerald-green waters, blue skies and a rugged empty landscape, Zannone has everything you’d expect from a near-deserted Italian island.

It also has a reputation for something rather more unexpected: Orgies. The rugged island is home to nothing but a white house and the dilapidated secret retreat of the sex-obsessed Marquis and his wife.

But in the late 60s, it was a hub of adultery, heavy drinking and orgies.  Locals knew the dark secrets of the racy goings-on at the villa in Zannone and its beaches.

“See that white colonial villa up high there?” says former fisherman Giorgio Aniello as he points a rough finger at a clifftop villa overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea.

Zannone became a hotspot for “lavish sex parties” after “chic and sexually adventurous aristocratic couple” Marquis Casati Stampa and Anna Fallarino rented it from the state. Stampa apparently enjoyed watching his wife with other guys and they would frequently host dukes, barons, countesses, billionaires and other VIPs to partake in such activities.

Aniello is a regular visitor to Zannone, taking tourists on boat trips to the wildest atoll among the Pontine archipelago off the west coast of Italy.

The big attraction, aside from the island’s natural beauty, is its dark, sexy past, most of which centres around the Marquis and his wife Anna Fallarino, a former actress.

“He was a lewd man, a voyeur who liked to watch and photograph his starlet wife get kinky having sex with with other younger guys,” Aniello adds, enjoying spinning R-rated tales as he navigates a maze of reddish-yellow cliffs, old stone fisheries and sea stacks.

“Then one day he got fed up of the threesome, shot the two lovers and killed himself.”

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Maneater: Theda Bara in a series of unconventional portraits. Her publicist claimed it was her lover and that not even the grave could separate them.

Theda Bara 

‘The Vamp’ of the Silent Screen

“A vampire is a good woman with a bad reputation, or rather a good woman who has had possibilities and wasted them”

 — Florenz Ziegfeld

The queen of the vamps was one of America’s most mysterious movie stars — Theda Bara. The magnetic actress, with her steely gaze and jet-black hair, was the prototype for a movie bad girl. She shook convention so dramatically that a critic called her a “flaming comet of the cinema firmament.”

Bara might be the most significant celebrity pioneer whose movies you’ve never seen. She was the movie industry’s first sex symbol; the first femme fatale; the first silent film actress to have a fictional identity invented for her by publicists and sold through a receptive media to a public who was happy to be conned; and she might have been America’s first homegrown goth.

According to the studio biography, Theda Bara (anagram of “Arab Death”) was born in the Sahara to a French artiste and his Egyptian concubine and possessed supernatural powers.

Progressive, liberated women were clearly so frightening one hundred years ago that equating them to undead, bloodthirsty creatures borne of Satan didn’t seem so unusual.

In the late 1910s, women were on the verge of winning the right to equal representation in the voting booth. Women were asserting power in unions, and, in the wake of disasters like the Triangle Factory Fire, those unions were influencing government policy. They were taking control of their destinies, their fortunes, even their sexuality (Margaret Sanger‘s first birth control clinic opened in 1916).

This surging independence came just as the entertainment industry heralded the female form as one of its primary attractions. Ziegfeld’s sassy, flesh-filled Follies — and its many imitators — defined the Broadway stage, mixing music, sex and glamour with a morality-shattering frankness.

But it was the birth of motion pictures that gave the allure of female bodies an unearthly, flickering glow, as nickelodeon shorts became feature-length films, and the first era of the movie siren was born.

Combine the power of liberation with the erotic potential of cinema, and in the late 1910s, you got the vampire (or as we would come to know, the ‘vamp’).

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My heart is as pure as the driven slush – Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Dahling

“Hello, Dahling . . . I’ll come and make love to you at five o’clock. If I’m late start without me.”
Her voice, her wit, and her face were captivating.

On why she called everyone dahling she stated that she was terrible with names and once introduced a friend of hers as Martini.  Her name was actually Olive.

Tallulah, with her signature “dah-ling”s and her notorious peccadilloes and her endlessly caricatured baritonal gurgle of a voice—a voice that was steeped as deep in sex as the human voice can go without drowning—would be easy to dismiss as a joke if she hadn’t also been a woman of outsize capacities. As it is, the story of her life reaches beyond gossip and approaches tragedy.
It was Tallulah’s real-life behaviour that really got people’s attention.

Tallulah’s scandalous career began at her seminary when, aged twelve, she fell in love with Sister Ignatius.  As she grew to adulthood she developed her romantic and sexual interests in a way which can really only be called trisexual: she would bed heterosexual men, preferably well hung, women and homosexual men, again preferably well-hung.  She stumbled across this life unprepared but took to it with enthusiasm and a breathtaking lack of concern for the proprieties.  She once said: ‘My father always warned me about men, but he never said anything about women!  And I don’t give a stuff what people say about me so long as they say something!’  She managed to keep them talking for the rest of her life, but her most admirable trick was always to pre-empt the insidious leakage of malicious gossip with reflexive innuendos so frank as to seem hardly believable.  Personal eccentricities, such as the refusal ever to wash her hair in anything other than Energine dry-cleaning fluid, probably helped to create the conditions in which she then felt able to defy more serious conventions in riskier ways.

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Errol Flynn Pictured With Beverley Aadland at The Lido Nightclub on Swallow Street, just off Piccadilly, 5th May 1959. The Couple Starred In The Film Cuban Rebel Girls And Had A Highly Publicised Relationship For The Last Two Years Of Flynn’s Life. Photo: Rex Features

In like Flynn Warts and All!!

“All around the world I was equated with sex”

-Errol Flynn

Errol Flynn once said: ‘I like my whisky old, and my women young’ and the above photo, while not saying anything about his choice of whisky, certainly says something about his taste in women, or should it be girls. He was one of Hollywood’s all-time great ladies’ men — a spirited womaniser who inspired the expression “in like Flynn.”

The picture above of Flynn, from May 1959, was taken a month or so before his fiftieth birthday and he’s accompanied by his girlfriend, Beverly Aadland, who was still a few months from her 17th birthday that September. According to Beverly’s mother, a former showgirl called Florence and who wrote about Flynn and Aadland’s romance in a book called The Big Love, by the summer of 1959 they had already been together for a year.

His tastes in young women caught up with him in 1943, when he was tried for statutory rape. Two underage girls (“jailbait” and “San Quentin quail”) claimed he had bedded them. Flynn was acquitted.

Flynn spent his breaks during the trial hitting on the teenager who ran the courthouse’s cigarette stand. Flynn invited her home — and she later became his second wife.

Errol Flynn was that guy — that one guy, we all know them — who was too handsome for his own good. Early on, he figured out what his looks could do for him, and he rode that wave to various destinations. He was a textbook womaniser, an astoundingly successful player — a lech, a cad, a rake, and any number of other British-sounding adjectives that describe the combination of sexual appetite and the charisma required to feed it.

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Parents are off the hook as teenagers’ views on sex come from the Internet

Auckland Grammar principal Tom O’Connor pulled no punches in a recent Herald article about teenage sexuality, bravely saying too many boys are getting their sex education from online porn.

He rightly pointed out that today’s overly aggressive digital pornography world does not reflect real relationships, and that “there doesn’t appear to be such a thing as consent”.

The prestigious Auckland school has introduced a healthy relationships programme to tackle these very issues. It should be applauded. And its example followed.

As O’Connor signalled, the sexual behaviour our teens are engaging in or being subjected to can have a long-lasting impact.

To blame porn on the Internet for rape culture would be the same as blaming murders and wars on the six o’clock news.  It assumes that the teenager doesn’t live as part of a family that has been living and demonstrating respect for the law, respect for others, and especially respect for self.   Read more »

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Our people are everywhere.

This was from the tipline last night:

Message: Spent the evening at Windsor Castle in Parnell, was full of Herald journalists who had recently attended the funeral of a colleague.   Read more »

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Seymour, Bisset is looking at you ... Worsley, his wife and Bisset had once attended a bath-house in the town and, while Lady Worsley was getting dressed, her husband had allowed Bisset to climb on his shoulders to ogle her half-naked form through a window.

Seymour, Bisset is looking at you … Worsley, his wife and Bisset had once attended a bath-house in the town and, while Lady Worsley was getting dressed, her husband had allowed Bisset to climb on his shoulders to ogle her half-naked form through a window.

Sex, Scandal and Divorce

 Lady Worsley had 27 lovers and Sir Richard was a Voyeur, a Pervert, a Deviant

The Battle between Sir Richard Worsley and George Bisset

In 1782, the chattering classes of Britain and the United States were held transfixed by the trial of George Bisset for criminal conversation. The transcript had seven printings in the first year–even George Washington requested one.

Lady Worsley ran off with her husband’s best friend, Captain George Bisset and by March 1782, their names and cartoon images were plastered all over London. Sir Richard was a voyeur who used to pimp Lady Worsley out to his friends, and then tried to unsuccessfully sue Bisset for 20,000 pounds in a Criminal Conversation, or adultery trial. The couple took great pains to completely ruin each other – and the public loved it. They queued outside booksellers shops for copies of the trial transcripts and the newspapers covered the farce for months. Poems and pamphlets of purported exploits were printed and hungrily consumed all that year and in the years to follow.

What legal options were available to the cuckolded husbands of 18th-century England? Divorce was a fantastically costly, excruciatingly public business, and only really viable for those blessed with deep pockets and lofty social rank.

The so-called parliamentary divorce was one possibility, which obliterated the marital union and left the parties free to re-marry.

However, there was also the solution dispensed by the ecclesiastical court of Doctors’ Commons: a legal separation of “bed and board” might be pronounced, but the former husband and wife were not then entitled to find new spouses. This was the vengeful cuckold’s first port of call: a wife who was unable to remarry stood an excellent chance of falling into penury.

What, though, of the scoundrel who had ravished her? Here the concept of “criminal conversation” – a euphemistic way of saying “having adulterous sex” – came to the fore.

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John Phillips may easily be called one of the best pop songwriters of the later 20th century. He honed his songwriting and arranging skills with singing groups that gained a modicum of success. But his crowning musical achievement was the work he did with his '60s group the Mamas and the Papas. Photo: MTV

John Phillips may easily be called one of the best pop songwriters of the later 20th century. He honed his songwriting and arranging skills with singing groups that gained a modicum of success. But his crowning musical achievement was the work he did with his ’60s group the Mamas and the Papas. Photo: MTV

Forbidden Fruit

A Lifetime of Debauched and Reckless Behaviour

John Phillips, destructiveness was too extravagant even for Keith Richards, who once kicked Phillips out of his house for being too uncontrollable

Unlike some other musician/addiction profiles, the John Phillips story is not necessarily one with a cheerful ending.

Mackenzie Phillips, his daughter, was 10 years old when her father taught her how to roll a joint. She had her first taste of cocaine at age 11. At 14, she landed a role in the film American Graffiti , and one week after her 18th birthday, she was arrested for the first time.

When she was 10, her dad gave her, her first adult job.

“Dad said, ‘I’m going to give you a project,’ Dad had a job for me! This was exciting. I was in.”

“I got really good at rolling joints. I was the official joint roller for all the adults.”

McKenzie says she was allowed so much freedom as a kid that the only rules her dad gave her were to spend one night a week at home and to always change her clothes before returning in the early morning.

“A lady never wears evening clothes during the day. It’s cheap,” John Phillips, who died in 2001, told her.

He did have one boundary. One day, Mackenzie found a purple pill in her dad’s bedroom.

She instinctively took it. But it turned out not to be just any pill — it was the last of the LSD pills made by the famous drug cook Owsley Stanley, and it was a collector’s item among moneyed celebrity druggies of the time.

“It was as if I’d crashed a normal dad’s Porsche, he said, ‘You took my last hit of Owsley. You’re grounded!’ ”

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Sade_DonatienThe Marquis de Sade

 Sex, Sacrilege and Sublimity

Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat and philosopher who became notorious for acts of sexual cruelty in his writings as well as in his own life

Warning – This Story May Be Disturbing and Offensive to Some People.

“Either kill me or take me like this, for I will not change,” wrote the imprisoned Marquis de Sade to his wife in 1783. It could only be one or the other for the most extreme author of the 18th Century. Sade, an unstoppable libertine, was in the middle of what would be an 11-year prison sentence, but he would not recant his principles or his tastes to get out of jail. Any diversion from his true nature was, for the marquis, equivalent to death.

Marquis de Sade, a French aristocrat, philosopher and writer of explicit sexual works, was born in Paris in 1740. His writings depict violence, criminality, and blasphemy against the Catholic Church. During the French Revolution he was an elected delegate to the National Convention. The last years of his life were spent in an insane asylum. He died in 1814.

Donatien Alphonse François, best known as Marquis de Sade, was born in Paris, France on June 2, 1740. His father was a diplomat in the court of Louis XV, and his mother was a lady-in-waiting. From the start, de Sade was raised with servants who flattered his every whim.

By the age of 4, de Sade was known as a rebellious and spoiled child with an ever-growing temper. He once beat the French prince so severely that he was sent to the south of France to stay with his uncle, an abbot of the church. During his stay, while he was 6 years old, his uncle introduced him to debauchery. Four years later, de Sade was sent back to Paris to attend the Lycée Louis-le-Grand. After misbehaving in school, he was subject to severe corporal punishment, namely flagellation. He spent the rest of his adult life obsessed with the violent act.

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helen-gurley-brown The Birth of the Cosmo Girl

Even Sex Goddesses get The Blues

Legendary Cosmo editor Helen Gurley Brown made her career on sleeping with many men and encouraging readers to do the same. But behind closed doors, she agonized over lost loves and unfaithful partners

Helen Gurley Brown was raised in poverty and insecure about her looks, she was anorexic, a workaholic, neurotically frugal, and addicted to psychotherapy and plastic surgery. Sex built her wealth and shaped her public persona. And Brown’s championing of sexual pleasure and freedom for women was no sham: Behind closed doors, sex thrilled and sustained Helen well into her eighth decade.

As the author of the groundbreaking 1962 advice book, Sex and the Single Girl, Helen Gurley Brown paved the way encouraging women to be financially independent and engage in, nay, enjoy sex before marriage.

She subsequently took the helm of Cosmopolitan as the Editor-in-Chief and spent the next 32 years  spreading the gospel of fab fashion and better orgasms.

Brown, helmed Cosmo for more than three decades, is nothing if not controversial. On the one hand, long before second-wave feminists took up the cause, Gurley Brown encouraged women to cast off Eisenhower-era expectations of marriage, kids, and housewifery in favour of moving to the city, playing the field, and building careers. On the other hand, her way of spoon-feeding progress to her readers—whom she called her Cosmo girls—was frustratingly retro, and her brand of bubbly, sexy, girly-girl power was desperately out of tune with the zeitgeist of the 1970s women’s lib movement, of which Steinem was a leader.

She was filled with contradictory messages, There were things in Sex and the Single Girl that were so ridiculous. Among Gurley Brown’s tips for women seeking boyfriends: Head to your local Alcoholics Anonymous meeting or join both the Democrat and the Republican parties to cast a wider net. You hope she’s joking, and she probably was. “But there’s this message: Be an individual. Don’t live in your parents’ house anymore. Go to the big city and make something of yourself.

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