shale gas

The Future of Energy: Man-made Global Warming and the Great Policy Error

GUEST POST

Today’s guest post by Whaleoil reader Bruce Alan Forbes is the final part of an article he wrote called The Future of Energy with predictions for 2040. As it was an in-depth analysis I divided it into six posts so that we could discuss each part separately.

Man-made Global Warming and the Great Policy Error

The catastrophic anthropogenic global warming (CAGW) – or dangerous man-made global warming/climate change – movement is the main reason why governments have implemented policies that every year cost consumers and taxpayers hundreds of billions of dollars. Although they are having little or no effect on CO2 emissions, these policies have in the meantime reduced millions of people in the developed world to fuel poverty, and are preventing hundreds of millions of people in developing countries from gaining access to cheap, reliable electricity from gas or coal-burning generators. This constitutes one of the greatest and most pervasive government policy errors in history.

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Want to combat global warming? You need to agree to fracking and nuclear power

I wonder if Gareth Hughes would care to comment on this news.

To be consistent with the MSM breathlessly reporting all doomsday IPCC predictions (most of which never eventuate) will we see headlines of fracking saving the environment and insightful comment from global warmists backing the IPCC findings ?

I think probably not.

Climate scientists have backed Britain’s shale gas revolution – saying it could help to slow  global warming.

The world’s leading experts on climate change say fracking will cut greenhouse gas emissions and should be made central to the country’s energy production.

It will help the UK move away from ‘dirty’ coal and contribute to saving the environment, according to a report by the influential Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

The report says it is ‘quite clear’ that fracking is ‘very consistent with low-carbon development’ and the technology could ‘significantly’ reduce emissions.

The unexpected endorsement from 235 eminent United Nations scientists and economists will be a welcome boost to David Cameron, who is a keen advocate of the new technology.

It is also a blow to green activists, who seek cuts in greenhouse gas emissions but are concerned about the effects of fracking.  Read more »

Another rogering for warmists, EU abandons Climate Protection Goals

The EU is moving to ditch climate protection goals as they seek ways to create and develop affordable energy solutions.

The EU’s reputation as a model of environmental responsibility may soon be history. The European Commission wants to forgo ambitious climate protection goals and pave the way for fracking — jeopardizing Germany’s touted energy revolution in the process.

The climate between Brussels and Berlin is polluted, something European Commission officials attribute, among other things, to the “reckless” way German Chancellor Angela Merkel blocked stricter exhaust emissions during her re-election campaign to placate domestic automotive manufacturers like Daimler and BMW. This kind of blatant self-interest, officials complained at the time, is poisoning the climate.

But now it seems that the climate is no longer of much importance to the European Commission, the EU’s executive branch, either. Commission sources have long been hinting that the body intends to move away from ambitious climate protection goals. On Tuesday, the Süddeutsche Zeitung reported as much.  Read more »

Fracking chemicals cause gender bending – latest hippy claim

What next in the Greens battle to make bird slaughtering windmills viable against cheap and abundant shale gas.

I would guess that eating organic veges is more gender bending and turns blokes into whinging girly men….Gareth Hughes and Russel Norman as evidence. When was the last time anyone saw a roughneck mincing around in a frock at the end of his shift handling this stuff ?

Just when you might have thought the debate over shale gas and oil could not possibly get more acrimonious, here’s something that is likely to raise the temperature even further. US scientists have announced this week that they have found “gender-bender” chemicals in water at fracking sites.

Their research – published in the latest issue of the journal Endocrinology – reports discovering endocrine disrupting substances that disrupt hormone systems in almost every sample of water they tested near shale gas wells. “I’m not an alarmist about this, but it is something the country should take seriously,” Prof Susan Nagel of the University of Missouri, one of the authors of the study, told the Los Angeles Times. “With fracking on the rise, populations may face greater health risks from increased endocrine-disrupting chemical exposure.”  Read more »

The year from hell for Global Warmists

2013 has been the year from hell for global warming fanatics says Lawrence Solomon:

Almost everything that could go wrong did go wrong for the cause of global warming

2013 has been a gloomy year for global warming enthusiasts. The sea ice in the Antarctic set a record, according to NASA, extending over a greater area than at any time since 1979 when satellite measurements first began. In the Arctic the news is also glum. Five years ago, Al Gore predicted that by 2013 “the entire North polar ice cap will be gone.” Didn’t happen. Instead, a deflated Gore saw the Arctic ice cap increase by 50% over 2012. This year’s Arctic ice likewise exceeded that of 2008, the year of his prediction. And that of 2009, 2010 and 2011.

Weather between the poles has also conspired to make the global warming believers look bad. In December, U.S. weather stations reported over 2000 record cold and snow days. Almost 60% of the U.S. was covered in snow, twice as much as last year. The heavens even opened up in the Holy Land, where an awestruck citizenry saw 16 inches of snow fall in Jerusalem, almost three feet in its environs. Snow blanketed Cairo for the first time in more than 100 years.

2013 marks the 17th year of no warming on the planet. It marks the first time that James Hansen, Al Gore’s guru and the one whose predictions set off the global warming scare, admitted that warming had stopped. It marks the first time that major media enforcers of the orthodoxy — the Economist, Reuters and the London Telegraph – admitted that the science was not settled on global warming, the Economist even mocking the scientists’ models by putting them on “negative watch.” Scientific predictions of global cooling – until recently mostly shunned in the academic press for fear of being labeled crackpot – were published and publicized by no less than the BBC, a broadcaster previously unmatched in the anthropogenic apocalyptic media.   Read more »

EU redtape and green whingers threaten fracking in Europe

At least the Green European MPs are honest.

They object to fracking because it undermines the already pretty crappy economic case for bird slaughtering windmills by making power cheaper.

The European Union has been accused of killing off the prospect of cheap energy from shale gas by trying to impose with expensive and “reckless” regulation of fracking.

The European Parliament on Wednesday voted for new EU laws requiring that exploration for potential deposits of shale gas to face the same environmental regulation as a full-scale oil drilling.

Struan Stevenson, a Conservative MEP who sits on the European Parliament’s environment committee, warned that the plan could strangle the nascent fracking industry in Britain.   Read more »

Sharing the riches of mining

The Daily Mail has a long article about fracking and how it has become the new gold rush.

As he takes me on a tour of his buzzing little town, mayor Brent Sanford points out the acres of development that have already happened — the giant grocery store, the smart restaurant, the school extension and the endless housing developments.

And he tells me what’s still to come — a smart new recreation centre, a state-of-the-art hospital, public housing, a day-care centre and even an 18-hole golf course.

There’s a new bank, which is essential, as so many local businesses are flourishing and so many more are clamouring to move in.

But it’s not always easy to hear what he’s saying.

His voice is drowned out by the rumble and roar of oil tankers, drilling trucks and the vast articulated lorries carrying waste water, clattering around his roads like an invading army on a never-ending victory parade.

The traffic noise and congestion are a pain, he admits, as are rocketing property prices — and the occasional punch-up as oil men hit town for a hard-earned drink or two.

North Dakotans are a conservative bunch who appreciate the solitude, the wide-open spaces and a simple way of life.   Read more »

David Cameron on Fracking

David Cameron explains why fracking is imperative to the success of Britain.

[F]racking has real potential to drive energy bills down. Labour’s mismanagement of the economy means that many people are struggling with the cost of living today. Where we can act to relieve the pressure, we must. It’s simple – gas and electric bills can go down when our home-grown energy supply goes up. We’re not turning our back on low carbon energy, but these sources aren’t enough. We need a mix. Latest estimates suggest that there’s about 1,300 trillion cubic feet of shale gas lying underneath Britain at the moment – and that study only covers 11 counties. To put that in context, even if we extract just a tenth of that figure, that is still the equivalent of 51 years’ gas supply.

This reservoir of untapped energy will help people across the country who work hard and want to get on: not just families but businesses, too, who are really struggling with the high costs of energy. Just look at the United States: they’ve got more than 10,000 fracking wells opening up each year and their gas prices are three-and-a-half times lower than here. Even if we only see a fraction of the impact shale gas has had in America, we can expect to see lower energy prices in this country.  Read more »

The world’s reserves of shale gas will frack the Middle East

We’re on the cusp of a geopolitical watershed.

The oil states of the Middle East will lose their guaranteed cash cow as world-wide stocks of shale gas are both plentiful and wide spread

Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, the billionaire Saudi investor, made a telling intervention in his country’s domestic politics last week, with an open letter arguing the U.S. shale gas revolution threatened its economy.

His point was a simple one, and well made. If America needs less Saudi oil, that can only be bad news for the nation exporting the stuff. It better start diversifying into other industries — and fast.

sg

 

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Poms stand to reap billions from Fracking

David Farrar, in between travel and arts posts, has a good example of the hypocrisy of the green taliban who want us to believe in the consensus in the science of global warming but ignore scientists when it comes to things like fracking.

Fracking is a great example…the green taliban want us to ignore history, facts, reason and most importantly economics. Michael Fallon is MP for Sevenoaks and Minister for Energy and Business and he counters the wailing of those opposed to fracking.

There is bound to be some disruption, but shale gas could cut energy bills and fuel economic recovery.

North, south, east and west, shale gas represents an exciting new potential resource for Britain that could contribute to our energy security, growth and jobs.

We only have to look across the Atlantic to see how it has reinvigorated the US economy: gas prices have halved, cutting costs for industry and consumers, and creating thousands of jobs and billions in new investment. Countries from India to Australia have looked on in envy at this boom – and are now joining in.

For its part, this Government is serious about shale. We are encouraging industry to find out how much is recoverable in all parts of the country. Given increasingly volatile international gas and oil prices, and our commitment to helping hard-pressed families with their bills, it would be irresponsible to ignore a new energy source right underneath our feet.  Read more »