starving people

Photo of the Day

The diary of Tanya Savicheva, a girl of 11, her notes about starvation and deaths of her sister, then grandmother, then brother, then uncle, then another uncle, then mother. The last three notes say “Savichevs died”, “Everyone died” and “Only Tanya is left.” She died of progressive dystrophy shortly after the siege. Her diary was shown at the Nuremberg trials.

The Siege of Leningrad

When Germans encircled Leningrad they planned to quickly freeze and starve the city. They had no idea the devastation and horror that the people of Leningrad would be willing to endure without ever giving in. The siege is one of the longest in history and one of the deadliest as well.

Leningrad, the old imperial capital, was the most beautiful city in Russia and had for centuries been her cultural heartland. Founded as Czar Peter the Great?s window on the West, it had known many agonies throughout its turbulent history, but in 1941 geography and pragmatic military strategy would see Leningrad engulfed in a tragedy unparalleled in modern history.

With most of Europe already under the heel of Nazi Germany, Hitler turned his attention eastward toward the vast expanse of the Soviet Union and on the morning of June 22, 1941, launched Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of Russia. Spearheaded by three Army groups, German forces stormed across the Russian frontier and completely overwhelmed the Red Army units in their path. With clinical precision, the world?s largest army was being systematically annihilated and, after just 18 days of fighting, the Russians had lost over three million men, 6,000 tanks, and most of their aircraft.

Germany and her allies attempted to strangle the life out of the historic Soviet city of Leningrad – the heart of the Russian Revolution

It would be no exaggeration to say that the family of every native citizen of St. Petersburg was touched by the blockade, which lasted almost 900 days, from September, 1941 to January, 1944. During that time nearly a third of the population at the siege?s beginning, starved to death. Roughly one in three. Many of them in the streets.

Few people outside realised what the siege was like. For years afterwards Stalin kept?people in the dark. Deaths were underestimated. Its party leaders were purged. For decades, details of the blockade have been little known in the West. Stalin suppressed the facts of the siege and twisted its history.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Dorothea Lange

Photo: Dorothea Lange

This photograph became an icon of the Great Depression: A migrant mother with her children burying their faces in her shoulder. Katherine McIntosh was 4 years old when the photo was taken. She said it brought shame — and determination — to her family.?”The picture came out in the paper to show the people what hard times was. People was starving in that camp. There was no food,” she says. “We were ashamed of it. We didn’t want anyone to know who we were.”

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Mike Wells.

Photo: Mike Wells.

Compassion Costs Nothing

Karamoja district, Uganda The hand of a severely malnourished boy rests in a Catholic monk?s hand in the Karamoja region of northeastern Uganda. Hunger has been a recurrent problem in the drought-prone region of Karamoja. Due to natural, social, and political causes, periods of famine intensified in the 1970s.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: ? Foundation Gilles Caron

Photo: ? Foundation Gilles Caron

Ibo Soldier, Biafra,1968

Ibo separatist guerrilla, near Onitsha, Biafra, Nigeria. The Ibo took up arms after years of ethnic friction.

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